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PUBLIC LIBRARY, 
» INC HIS 



THE WINCHESTER STAR, 



S3 



VOL. L NO. 15 



WINCHESTER, MASS, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7. 1930 



PRICE SEVEN CENTS 



WINCHESTER FOR ALLEN AND 
BUTLER 

Voted for Repeal of State Liquor Law 
and to Return Warren and Kate- 
man to Congress 

In the midst of the big Democratic 
tidal wave which swept Ely and C >oI- 
idge to victory, Winchi Jter maintained 
it- standing as a Republican town by 
casting a substantial majority vote in 
support of Governor Allen's candidacy 




BAPTIST CHURCH WELCOMES 
MISSIONARY HOME 



At a crowded service last Sunday 
evening, .Miss Lydia Jennie Craw- 
ford, medical missionary at the Bap- 
tist station at Suifu, West China, was 
given a warm welcome on her return. 
.She has been located at this same 
station lor about 15 years, and is now 

JOIN THE RED CROSS NOV. 11-25 home her fu, ; |,,u >-' h . having taken 

over three months to make the trip 



to succeed himself, and by voting to I rhe . Winchester Red Cross again 
send William M. Butler to the Senate; TO* l " every man, woman, and 
though in the second instance by less . ci,lld to support the Red < ross in the 
convincing figures. By the slim mar- j S 0 nlB f 1 .^ nnual """"bership dnve - 
e-in of nine votes Winchester voted for 1 * 1 , ., _ 

.i i r ,u n.,\ ■■ u i .. ..i \,i : "he demands upon the Red < ross 

he . ' ' th tit i "n ! If 1 . i. ' this year t.ave been heavy. While 
this being the first hatanee in the j disaster has occurred, the 

town history when local sen ' >™nt has nat| J, orjfani?ation and tne ' h 
been expressed in opposition to pro- ( te „ have been Qn constant d * 
hibil ion, 

The town also supported tlie candi- 
dacy of it- present representatives in 
the State Senate and General Conn 
respectively, Charles C. Warren of 



various sections of the country. 

Ninety catastrophes, including tor- 
nadoes. Hoods, tires, mine explosion-, 
forest tires, etc., occurred in 38 states, 
i A fund amounting to $106,970 was 



Arlington and I Thomas R. Bateman of j expenc i et] r or aid jn w i nter Hoods in 
Winchester. Senator Warren defeated Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana and Mis- 
Charles T, Daley in Winchester by SO uri. 

more than two to one. while Mr/Bate- [ ' A relief fund of $135,000 was. raised 
man's majority was nearly three to, f,,,, victims of tornadoes in the mid- 
one over his fellow townsman, Ed- w, s , w |„.,, n | IV ,. S we re lost, 
ward F. Maguire. , Assistance afforded to service and 

Winchester repudiated the Candida- ex-service men by home service work- 
cy of one Republican when it support- i , rs m camps and hospitals cost on an m £nt, j"" 
ed Charles F. Hurley, Democratic can- average $13,271 monthly. Recrea- 
didate for treasurer over the Republi- : tional and educational events in camps 
can. Fred Jefferson Rurrell, The fact j an d hospitals numbered 20,381 and 
that Mr. Hurley polled 2213 to Mr. arivicc and ex-serviee men or their 
Burrell's 1872 in a Republican town famili' - who were assisted by the 
like Winchester is significant. | Red Cross averaged each month 

The total vote cast here was 4618 ll,0,"8. 



Music was furnished by the hal- ' 
vation Army Band under' the direc- 
tion of Brigadier Hargraves, and con- 
sisted of familiar hymns, in which 
the congregation joined in singing. 

Owing to the sudden illness ol the 
pastor, Rev. B. p, Browne and his 
whole family, as a result of poisoning I 
Mr. Browne was unable to attend and 
take charge of the service, much to I 
the disappointment of all. 

The welcome of the church was ex- 
tended by the church moderator, D. 
c. Linscott, w ho first of all impressed 
on the members what a remarkable 
occasion it was. in that they were not I 
only welcoming their fellow-member 1 
back from the mission field, hut a 1 
fellow-member who had been in Chi- 
na with all its dangers from revolu- 
tions and bandits, and had remained 
at her post when all were ordered out 
oi China until the very last mo- 
was the first to return 
when the ban was removed. In wel- 
coming Miss Crawford he said in 
part, "We welcome you back from 
far-off China and are very grateful 
that you have not only been spared 
from all the dangers of bandits and 
t warring factions, but also from re- I 



on 1 of r.xiil voters. Two years ago in, Winchester has aided in a number 
a Presidential year 5880 votes were of cases of human distress the details 
cast, and lour years ago 3378 votes | of which, for apparent reasons, can- 
were recorded, The town, however, 
did not have go many registered vot- 
ers in 1926 so the difference in that 
nstnnce is not surprising. 

Local election officials believe Win- 
chester's vote on Tuesday was a good 



llglOUS persecution. We assure you 
that while you have been gone you 
| have b on remembered week by week 
not be publish. !!. ! il! ">'' services of the church, first 

We could k r o on and on quoting i '*>' Mr. Walcott, who was pastor when 
figures like these but, needless to say, I you left Winchester the last time, 
haven't the space. then by Rev. Mr. Brougher who 

No matter how little extra money served as acting pastor after Mr. 
you may feel you have this year, I Walcott, and more recently by our 
one. The last returns were made to I there are others much worse off than j present pastor, the Rev, -Mr. Browne, 
Town Clerk Mabel W. Stinsc n at 8:30 you, We hope you will do your ut- | We know that you have had many 
and at 0:20 the final tabulatin was most, therefore, to have every mem- J times id" encouragement, and we al- 
completed. The polls closed at 6 p. m. ber of your household join the Red j so know that you have had times of 
and as usual Precinct 4 was the first to Cross in Winchester during the pe- 1 disappointment, but wc feel sure that 
announce its results. The election of- riod Nov. 11-25. I you have always been supported by 

fleers were served dinner at noon at I I the feeling that you wore serving un- 

the Food Shop on Church street and! NO EPIDEMIC HERE I der One who did not know defeat- 
in the evening sandwiches and coffee — ! ,,ru " w "o would protect you and guide 

were served at the Town Hall. i Several Families Poisoned From Food j you " 

In general it was a quiet election.! — | . "Men often times go to war even 

There seemed fewer than usual about . 

the polls, though the women were ac- i nine nuns at St. Mary a Convent and 
live during much of th 




COMING EVENTS 

Nov. :. Friday, 3 :80 p. m . Fortnightly 
Hall Wadleitth Parent-Teacher*' Association 
will lu'l t a t«-H. 

Nov. [i, Tuesday. Reirular meeting *•{ Win- 
chester Lodge of Klks. Lyceum Hall. 

Nov 10, Monday evening. Pre-Armistice 
Hay Hall, auoeicea Winchester Post, Ameri- 
can t.agion, In Ui ■ Town Hail. 

No* li, Tuesday. Regular meeting, Wil- 
liam Parkman Lodge of Masons. Masonic 
Apartments at 7 p m 

r. N °L Vv WednMd * y ' • P- »'• Unitarian 
i.oi-h Home. Ksadingn by Miss Sylvia 
Parker. Tea., Tickets .""> cents, 

Nov, IS, Thursday. Regular meeting. My»- 
tic \ alley Lodft* of Masons, Masonic Apart- 
in nts, . :30 p. m. 

Nov. 14, Friday, Annual Bazaar ..f Craw- 
nird-Memorial MethtxIM Church. Dinner nt 

N,.\ . 21, Friday evening. Free lecture on 
I (matin n- Science in Town Hall, Winchester, 
«l s o clock, 



<>l R OFFER 

In accordance «ith our usual 
custom, all ne* subscriptions to 
the STAR received up to the 
first of the >ear. will be given 
a Januar> first dating. This of- 
fer applies only to new subscrib- 
ers who have not previously 
taken llrs paper. Subscribe now 
and receive the remaining issues 
I bis ; car free. 



dav. 



Several families in town, including for a lofty ideal, — 'to save the world 

for Democracy' — 'to save the union' 
— 'to prevent unjust taxation;' but 



Con- I the family of Rev. Benjamin Patter- 



NEW CO-OPERATIVE HANK 
BUILDING 

The proposed new building for the 
Winchester Co-operative Hank, a 
sketch of which appears in this issue, 
is to be erected on Vine street, just 



victims ate one article of food, it is 
assumed this was the cause. 



PASSION PLAY AT CRAWFORD 
MEMORIAL CHURCH 



sister. Mi 
Wincbestei 



Chester each receiving 3068. Cover- ! full report has not yet been made it is 
nor Allen polled one vote less, getting] supposed the attacks were caused by 
:!0(i7. The anti-steel trap law was food. 

overwhelmingly supported here, the i The victims were in all instances 
affirmative vote of 2*7<i exceeding the extremely sick for a shoit period, and 
opposition by about three to one. have all recovered at this time 

Precinct 3 with 862 votes led in the ] Physicians called, notified the Health 
number of ballots cast, the other pre- Department and Inspector Dinneen in 
cinct returns being: Precinct 1, 802; I turn called in the State Hoard of 
Precinct 2. 759; Precinct 4, 772; Pre- I Health, the f<>od coming from an out 
cinct 5, 724; Precinct 6, 699. 

The complete vote by precincts fol- 
lows: 

(Continued to page 9) 

WURTH— SHULTIS 

At a simple ceremony in the sum- 
mer home of her parents at South 
Newbury, N. H. last Saturday af- 
ternoon, Nov. I, Miss Ruth Van de 
Hogert Shultis, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Newton Shultis of Winthrop 
street, became the bride of VV alter 
Albert Wurth, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Fdward A Wurth. of Maplewood, N. 
J Rev. Benjamin Patterson Browne, 
pastor of the First Baptist < hureh. 
performed the marriage ceremony a 
§:30 in the broad living room against 
a background of autumn foliage, yel- 
low chrysanthemums and evergreen. 
Only members of the immediate fami- 
lies and a few intimate friends Wert 

P1 Miss' Shultis was given in marriage 
by her father and attended by her 
' *" Katherine Shultis of 
Roland Cooke of Mont- 
. ,• N. J,. was best man. 

The bride wore a formal afternoon 
gown Of midnight blue trimmed with 
cream lace, and carried a bouquet of 
Madonna roses. Her attendant wove 
a similar gown of rosebeige and 
cream lace and carried Talisman roses 

an FotS r the ceremony an inform 
al reception was held and a buffet 
luncheon served in the dining room 
which was effectively decorated With 
white chrysanthemums and white and 
HE ribbons. Upon their return 
from a wedding journey Mr. WUrtn 
and bis brid.; are to make their home 
in Orange. N. J. . , 

The bride is a graduate of the 
Cambridge-Haskell School and of 
Connecticut College for Women. Mr. 
Wurth is a graduate of Nev, torK 
University. 

HOME FOR AGED PEOPLE IN 
WINCHESTER 

The officers and directors of the 
Home for Aged People in Winchester 
have chosen Thursday, Nov. 13 from 
3 p. m. to S p. m. for the annual re- 
ception, sale, and donation day. Cake, 
candy, marmalade and an attractive 
collection of fancy work will be on 

The goal toward which the direc- 
tors are workine this year, is the 
painting of the Home. All cash do- 
nations and amounts realized from 
the sale will be used for this purpose. 

The public is cordiallv invited to be 
present and enjoy a social hour. Tea 
will be served. 

Donation* of flour, sugar, veeeta- 
bles and standard household supplies 
will be gratefully received. 

Patricia Croiighwell, Esther Loftus 
and June Pottinvell gave a very suc- 
cessful Hallowe'en masnuerade party 
last Thursdiv evening. The prizes for 
the best costumes were won by Jean 
Beach and Andrew" Young. 



agonizing suffering 
among their own com- 



as well as 
even death 
rades. 

"While you. Miss Crawford, have 
engaged in the Christiian warfare 
and have seen comfort come to those 
in need, relief to those in suffering, 
and light to those in darkness. I 
venture to say that there have been 
times when you have felt that you 
were in the presence of God hims 
when the miracles of salvation were 
taking [dace right before your eyes. 
We shall be glad to hear all about 
your experiences." 

He then referred to the happenings 
that had occurred while she had been 
away; the going of some of the 
sainted members of the church, the 
rallying of the members resulting in 
the pledging of over $200,000 for th 



iae source. The department s report 
has not been made at this time. 

The affair caused considerable com- 
ment about town and by yesterday the 
number of persons affected had been 
set at from IS7 to -47, the cause being 
laid to the town water, owing to a 
short interruption in the high service 
supply necessary to replacing a pipe 
on Highland avenue. 

It is stated that the town water was 

in no ways to blame, and as all of the | n «' w chwch, and th. - ........ -> , t T , , , , 

the beautiful housi m which the serv- V""uis. to mi rear ot me panK- 

l ing room and on the same floor level 



COMMUNITY RELIEF 

On Monday. Nov. 3, in the Calumet 
Club house representatives of the fol- 
lowing organizations met to consider 
Community Relief in Winchester: 
Methodist Church 
Unitarian Church 
liuiitist Church 
' ' Mary's Church 
Congregational Church 

. i ui>al Church 
Red Cross 

Winchester Rotary Club 
Winchesti r Lodge of Klks 
Catholic W>, men's Guild 
The Fortnightly 
Public Welture Board 

It was voted to organise a perma- 
nent committee to be known as the 
Citizens' Community Relief Commit- 
tee, whose duty would be to handle 
all relief work in Winchester and to 
cheek all cases so as to avoid dupli- 
Entering the building through a cation and prevent the overlooking of 



street and a depth of 70 feet 

The Vine street front will have a ; 
base of dark Quincy granite and i 
above, buff Indiana limestone, with 
mcrtfi) -ash and actinic glass in the 
large panel. The building will be of 
fireproof construction. A somewhat 
conservative interpretation of so- 
called modernistic treatment has been 
^'j' f adonted by the architect. 



vestibule on Vine street one steps in- 
to the main banking room, which i< 
about :?o feet square and 125 feet high 
—amply lighted by large metail sash 
windows in both front and rear walls. 
The space for the public extends along 
the right side of the banking room 
and the Treasurer's office and the 
working space, which are located on 
construction "of I ,no ,(,ft ' are separated from it by low 



Dr. Harvey Hadlock brought the 
Passion play of Oberammergau to the 
Methodist Church on last Wednesday 
evening through a beautiful series 
of pictures, Dr. Hadlock has seen 
every presentation of this great re- 
ligious drama since 1910. Included 
among the pictures of this year were 
several of the characters of the play- 
as it was enacted in 1022. By show- 
ing those as well as the pictures of 
this year, he was enabled to point 
out not only the beauties of the play- 
but the changes that are made from 
season to season, 
de 

lihood 

enacted during the year 1034, the 
!?')0th anniversary of the inaugura- 
tion of the great religious drama. 



iny worthy case. 

Mr. Geo. T. Davidson was elected 
chairman and Mr. Nathaniel Nichols 
secretary for the ensuing year. 

Efforts are to be made to have all 
churches and fraternal societies rep- 
resented on committee. 



CHAMBER ADVOCATES CLOSING 
ON ARMISTICE DAY 



In an effort to learn whether local 
merchants are to observe Armistice 
Day by closing their establishments 
Tuesday the STAR 



Then, with the congregation stand- ! ,s the bank vault, machine and filing 

ing, Mr. Linscott formally extended I room ' director's room and attorney's 

the welcoming hand to Miss Craw- ™ om . Wlth thi ; u * uaI provisions for on Tuesday the STAR consulted 

ford and presented her with a bou- I , " 1 '', t ™ om *> sta.rs to basement etc. Preside nt George F Arnold and Sec- 

que* of roses in behalf of the church. Thf> ^hU^ of the building will be retary Ernest H. Butterworth ol the 
Mr 

teni 
of 



i oi roses in oeriaii o lite ciiurcii. 7 , . , < !,.,,,, I, ,. r <■,..,.„ i » 

■Irs. Charles A. Burnham then ex- Prided for by a system in which , Cham h ir of ( , m merce ast evening 
dorl th,. (rrootincf from trio wnmon concealed radiation and an automat'- l> " tA advocated the closing of all 
?he JhSiSTSMSS - ^"vs: i ««» controlled oil-burning boiler will ^iS^ftntf SSSS dVv" 
It has h„en such a pleasure to lis- & Suitable provisions for ven- nold «tat« that since Armistice Day 



pleasure 

ten to Deacon Linscott's words of 
welcome to you. Miss Crawford, first, 
because of their sincerity and second, 
because thev voice the sentiments of 
each one of us, so truly. While we 
women are. of course, included in his 
welcome, we feel that we would like 
to say a word just for ourselves." 
"Each week your name is printed 



tilating and air-moistening have been 
included Sound deadening will be 
employed on the walls of the machine 



is a national holiday the Chamber 
deemed it unnecessary to take an in- 
dividual poll of the merchants in the 
mom. and elsewhere as required. An matter of closing. He believed the 
incinerator for burning waste papers, stores should and would close on the 
etc.. will b" Installed in connection holiday. 

with the boiler. 

The Building Committee expects to WINCHESTER POST HELD PRE- 
arrange for night illumination of tho I ARMISTICE DAY BANQUET 

I'uilding fr A nt by flood light. It is . — 

Legionnaires turned out in large 



ason to season. Though not fully j "» the front page of our calendar, as . , ^.onnaires turned out in large 

eided as yet. there is a strong like- our missionary :n China, hut we hard- J 00 * ; «J th iv. to , make a si b . b * , ast evening for the 
«ood that the Passion play wi.l be ^ay banquet at the Post 



FLORIDA JUBILEE SINGERS AT 
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL 
CHURCH 



Wednesday Evening at 7:45 



The Florida Jubilee Singers, under 
the leadership of Mr. N. W. Collier, 
will sing Plantation Melodies at the 
mid-Week service on Wednesday even- 
ing in Rinley Chapel, First Congre- 
gational Church. 

The Florida Jubilee Singers are 



most constantly in our thoughts, and 
are by your consecration and devo- 
tion to the work of the Master, a 
source of inspiration and help to us 
who are trying to do His will here at 
home. We watch your progress with 
such keen interest, and our prayers 
for you and your work and your 
safety I am sure are answered. For 
have you not carried on in His name, 
in the face of great difficulties and 
disappointments, the work He has set 
before you?" 

"We rejoice with you as we watch 
together the fruition of your labors, 



streets. 



probably the finest colored quartet in 
the country today and have delighted 

large audiences all over the eastern the touch cf your hand, and hear 

part of the United States. your voice; you, who so bravely re- 

Thev sang for Mavor and Mrs. Col- tilled in answer to His call. "Lord 

lis while they were in Winchester here am I, send me,' and turned your 



and we want you to know how glad 
we are that you are in the homeland | 

once again, all safe and well, where , The regular meeting for November 
we may look into your face, and feel will be held next Thursday evening. 



Common and the adjacent . , 

headquarters. G. Warren Johnston 

i was in charge of the banquet which 
The construction of the budding included tur £ ev and .. a „ tnc fixinV . 

is m charge of a building committee A ,, rief busim \ ss meetitlg w88 pre . 

composed of John Chalhs, chairman; , , d d , h ^ p c * 

R M y r" n :' wT\ J r M I • n I, ; tZB t ,, . r - mander. Major Wade L. Grindle. 
aid. Curtis W. Nash. Ernest R. Eustis. p , ans for Arnlisti( , 0 flay and for the 

The architect selected by the com- j big night before dance to be held in 
mittee is Edward R. Wait, whose | the Town Hall were discussed, as 
work is already represented in Win- j were a ] so the preparations for the 
Chester bv the building designed for ; big parade which is to be staged in 
the Winchester Trust Company and , Woburn on the holiday. Commander 
the Fire and Police Buildings. Grindle introduced the speaker of the 

evening. Col. Harry G. Chase, State 
Quartermaster, who gave a most in- 
teresting address. 



WINCHESTER GIRI S' \. \ TO 
PL A^ TWO GAMES 

Winchester Girls' A. A, field hock- 
ey team will try to break into the win 
column tomorrow afternoon when it 
meets Lexington in a Boston F, H. A. 
match on Manchester Field at ."> 

o'clock. The locals lost a 1 I) ver- 
dict to Lexington in a previous name 
away from homo and are out to even 
scores on Saturday. 

Vrmistict Day at 10 o'clock, the 
Winchester girls meet the Motley 
• lub in an association match on the 
playgn und, and this should turn out 
to be a good game. All Winchester 
needs is practice, and better combina- 
tion play to hold its own with most, 
of the Boston Association teams. In- 
dividually the girls have a good club, 
but lack of opportunity for practice 
has n tarted its development. More 
and more interest however, is being 
shown and improvement is hound to 
come with better attendance at prac- 
tice sessions. 

It is hoped that a good crowd will 
turn out both for Saturday's game 
and on the holiday. The effort of the 
A. A. to provide sports for girls be- 
yond school and college is commenda- 
ble and worthy of support. 

MESSAGE OF THANKS FROM 
CHARLES T. DALEY 

I •>. ^.through the column- of the 
S7.\i-j*4r4' oress my deep gratitude 
to all the Jemocratic and indepen- 
dent voters of Winchester who gave 
me their vote for State Senator at 
the election last Tuesday. 

I also take this opportunity to ex- 
press mv warm personal appreciation 
of the loyal and generous support 
and assistance rendered to myself 
and tho other Democratic candidates 
at the State election and during 'be 
hard campaign of the last few 
! months by many hundreds of friends, 
personal and party workers. They 
have given unsparingly of their time 
ability and energy to promote my 
election to the State Senate from 
the Mystic Valley District. 

The cause I represent, and the 
nrinciples I stand for are well worth 
fighting for, regardless of any per- 
sonal victory. 

I shall be at the service of that 
cause in the future as in the past. 

Charles T. Daley. 

Democratic Candidate for State 

Senator, fith Middlesex District 
55 Summit Road, Med ford 

WINCHESTER AT WATERTOWN 
SATURDAY 

Winchester High School's football 
team will journey to Watertown 
Saturday afternoon for a Mystic 
Valley League game with Watertown 
Hi' r h on Victory Field at 2 o'clock. 

Watertown is not the usually strong 
aggregation that has represented the 
Arsenal town in former years and on 
paper at least are hardly good enough 
to win from the locals. 



TOWN TEAM IN HOLIDAY 
ATTRACTION 



M. C. W. G. NOTES 



The regular semi-annual concert at 
the Holy Ghost Hospital will be held 
on Sunday afternoon Nov. 23 at 2 
, . , .. . , p. m. The State Guild will conduct 

recently, and have also recently sung face towards that far distant land mat jnee whist and bridge at the 
before Governor Allen. ' that His Kingdom might come and 

The melodies which they are to I His will (> be done on earth as it is in 
sing on Wednesday evening have been j heaven.' " 

specially chosen by Dr. Chidlev as | "We do welcome you home so sin- 
his favorites and include "The Gospel j cerely and with loving hearts, Jen- 
Train." specially arranged by the nie Crawford. 

ouartet. Other old. familiar mclo- I . M"" Crawofrd then responded, 
dies will be included I thanking the church and the women 

The general public is invited. Mr. i of tne church for their warm welcome 
Wabeke will conduct the service and I and assuring them that she had an- 
speak on "Self Realization." ! Pfeciated while being away all their 

| kind thoughts and prayers. She felt 

ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED 1 su T e that she would not have been 

able to accomplish as much as she 



Announcement is made of the en- ! had if jt had not been for the moral 
gagement of Alice A. Fenton of this I s upr>°rt of her friends at home, 
town, and Albert Johnson of Joliet, She then explained very clearly 
III. Miss Fenton is Advertising Man- \ about conditions in China and gave 
ager of the New England Laundries. ! her own opinions as to the future of 
Mr. Johnson is secretary-treasurer China. 

of the Laundry-owners National As- ' She said that we must give China 
sociation, whose executive offices are a chance to find herself; that it took 
at Joliet. France many years to find itself and 



Copley Pla?.a Saturday afternoon. 
Nov. 15. Tables may be reserved by 
calling V. R. Anna DeCeurcy, Win. 
0075-M and Regent N. Ambrose, Win. 
0566-W. 



found a lasting republic. We must 
five the Chinese an equal chance and 
they will surely succped Shp said 
that on her return from Shanghai af- 
ter her enforced absence, she was 
rratified to find how well the Chris- 
tian Chinese had carried on in her 
nbspnee. Most of thorn had b«en 
faithful in snite of much persecution 
through which she saw evidences of 
an encouraging future for the Chi- 
nese. She also spoke of th*> disrup- 
tion caused by the Russian Reds. 

At the close of the service Mi«s 
Crawford, assisted by Mrs. Burn- 
ham, held an informal reception, and 
many lingered until a late hour. 



Local football fans will have a sec-- 
ond opportunity to see th" undefeated 
Winchester Town Team in action on 
Armistice Dav when "Archa" Amieo's 
hoys will take on the strong Minute 
Hoys' eleven of Lexington at 2:'W p. m. 
on Manchester Field. With the high 
school idle on the holiday it is expect- 
ed that a big crowd will be on hand to 
see the "Townies" strut their stuff. 



Miss Eleanor Ives, daughter of Mr. 
ind Mrs. Frederick Manley Ives of 
Highland avenue, was among those 
elected to membership in the Vincent 
Club at the club election last week 
Thursday. Miss Ives is to make her 
debut on Dec. 8. 



Mr. and Mrs. Edward S. Newhall of 
Medfofd are the parents of a daugh- 
ter, Nancy, born lpst week nt the 
Cambridge Hospital. Mrs. Newhall 
was before her marriage Miss Ruth 
Winn, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Har- 
ry T. Winn of Swan road. 



We FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

OF WINCHESTER 

Rev. Benjamin P. Browne, Minister 



SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9 

9:30 A. M. — The Church School 
10:45 A. M. — Rev. J. Gresham Machen, D.D., Ph.D. 

Of Philadelphia (formerly of Princeton) 

"What Is Christianity?" 
7 P. M — Dr. Machen— "Is Christianity True?" 

SPECIAL MUSIC 



2 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 7. 1930 




It Is Not Too Late To 
Join Our 1931 Tax Club 



OCTOBER DIVIDEND ON REGULAR DEPOSITS 
AT THE RATE OF 

5% 

Winchester Savings Bank 

26 MT VERNON ST. 

BUSINESS HOURS 8AMT03PM 




WIN CHESTER, MASS 

SATU RDAYS 8 A M TO I? M -7J0 830 PM 



INCORPORATED 1871 



FROST— MOUNTAIN 




H A LLO W E' EN (i EN BR A LLY 
QUIET HERE 



LADIES' ALL-WOOL JERSEY JUMPER DRESSES in 

red, green, blue and rust, complete with biege 
jersey blouses, each $5.00 

LADIES' WOOL COVERT CLOTH SKIRTS, gored and 

finely tailored, each $3.00 

WHITE BROADCLOTH AND COLORED BLOUSES, each 

$1.00 and $1.98 

Also a select line of skirts, blouses and sweaters for the 
juniors and little girls. 



I 



L 



Winch 

540 MAIN STP E 



Goods Co. 



i 

i 

TEL. WIN. 2255 j 



REV. CHARLES L. MITCHELL 



Ri>v, Charles L. Mitchell <>f this 
town died Sunday morning after a 
brief illness at Deland, Kin., where 
he had gone for the winter season. 

Rev. Mr. Mitchell was the only son 
of Dr. Chauncey Leeds Mitchell, one 
of the founders of the Lonn Island 
College Hospital, and of Caroline 
(Langdon) Mitchell. He was horn in 
Brooklyn, N. Y. in 1845 and was 
graduated from Yale with the class 
of 1 s*>(> . Following his graduation 
from Yale, he entered Andover Theo- 
logical Seminary, from which he was 
graduated in 1870. 

He was ordained into the ministry 
of the Congregational Church at 
Littlo Valley, N. Y., in 1871, and 
there held his first pastorate, holding 
but two more during his years of ac- 
tive service, in Wysox, Pa.J and at 
Sedalia. Mo. 

In 1871, Rev. Mr. Mitchell married 
Miss Margaret B. Tenney of Methuen 
who dini m 1905, Forty-one years 
atro he came to Winchester and had 



i since made his home here, taking dur- 
I mix the more active years of his life 
j a prominent part in community af- 
fairs. 

He is survived by a daughter, Miss 
LHUe C. Mitchell, and by a son, 
Chauncey L. Mitchell, both of Win- 
chester. 

The funeral will he held this Fri- 
day afternoon at the late residence, 
; 4 Summit avenue, with the Rev. How- 
ard J Chidley, pastor of the First 
i Congregational Church, officiating, 
| Interment will be in Wildwood 
Cemetery. 



Mr. anil Mrs. Henry E. Crowley of 
this town sailed Sunday on the S.S. 
Seythia from Boston for Queenstown 
and Liverpool. Mr. Crowley, who 
represents A. Forbes & Co. Ltd., of 
Calcutta, exporters of hides and skins 
has made 27 Atlantic voyages, has 
been around the world twice and has 
gone through the Red Sea and Suez 
Canal 14 times. 



Hallowe'en slipped by very quietly 
so far as Winchester was concerned, 
inclement weather aiding the effective 
efforts of the police force in keeping 
the exhuberance of youthful celebra- 
tory well within hounds. 

Many parties about town kept a 
large proportion of the youngsters off 
the streets, and those who were out 
ami about found the patrolmen very 
vigilant in suppressing any mischief 
which threatened to become malicious. 

To he sure there was damage (lone, 
but the complaints were not so numer- 
ous nor so urgent as in years past. 
Super intendent Harry \V. Dotten noti- 
fied Headquarters that two youngsters 
had broken the lanterns placed at a 
trench on Cambridge street, and at 
9:40 Patrolman James E. Farrell dis- 
covered that a gang of hoys had brok- 
en a window in the rear of a house on 
Water' street, 

Two panes of glass were broken in 
a garage on Punster 1 -!■>• ' 

after li o'clock the p< 
move a plank which h; 
the road on Main st . ..,:'.t 

street. About 7:30 .... i . lice '.....i 
another trip to remove a plank from a 
roadway, this time at Brookside ave- 
nue, and it was necessary to send offi- 
cers to the Old Chapin School and to 
Kelley & Hawes Company to put a 
curb on some boys' idea of a good time. 

A complaint from a resident of Ev- 
erett avenue who was being bothered 
by boys was followed by the report 
that a large pane of glass had been 
broken in a house on upper Main 
street. The mail box was broken off 
at a Ridge street home, and a gate 
was pulled from its foundation at a 
Yale street residence. A Highland 
avenue householder complained that 
her clothes reel had hen pulled up and 
broken, and six pigeons were stolen 
from a residence in Rangeley. Some 
damage was done to a gate on Hillside 
avenue and a resident of Holland 
street complained about boys smashing 
the fence at his home. 

There were no alarms of fire and 
no arrests recorded. Both police and 
fire officials stated that the night was 
one of the most peaceful on lecord, 
though there are probably citizens 
here and there about town who won't 
agree with them 



At a candle-light service In the Rip- 
ley Memorial Chapel of the First Con- 
gregational Church last Saturday af- j 
ternoon Miss Horothy Mountain, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Everett j 
Ronald Mountain of Woodside road, j 
became the bride of Lore Alford 
Frost, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lore E. j 
Frost of Derry. N. H. The pastor 
of the church. Rev. Howard J. Chid- , 
ley, 1>.D., performed the marriage I 
ceremony in a simple setting of palms. 
Mr. J. Albert Wilson, church organ- j 
ist, played the wedding music. 

Miss Mountain was given in mar- i 
riage by her father and had as her 
honor attendant her sister. Miss Paul- 
ine E. Mountain of Winchester. An- j 
other sister, Miss Marjorie D, Moun- 
tain of Winchester, was bridesmaid 
with Miss Marion Gamete- of Edge- | 
wood. X. J. 

The best man was Joseph A. Frost 
of Derry, X. H.. and the corps of i 
ushers included John C. Weinbeck and 
Edward C. Power of Lowell. Waldron 
G. Low of Derry. X. H., and Edwin j 
I,. Marsden of Spencer. 

The bride wore a wedding gown of 
ivory satin with a long tulle veil and 
carried a white prayer book in place 
of the conventional bouquet. Her 
honor attendant wore tangerine point 
d'esprit and carried an old fashioned I 
bouquet. The bridesmaids carried the 
same flowers, and also wore frocks of 
point d'esprit, one yellow, and the 
other blue. 

Following the ceremony a reception 
was held at the home of the bride's 
parents who assisted in receiving with 
the mother of the bridegroom. The 
house decorations were autumn leaves, 
palms and evergreen. After a wed- 
ding journey Mr. and Mrs. Frost will 
live in Lebanon, X. H., where they 
will be at home after Dec. 1. 

The bride is widely known in Win- 
chester, having served for the past 
three years as secretary of the First 
I Congregational Church. Mr. Frost is 
t a graduate of the University of New 
. Hampshire where he was a member of 
■ Phi Mu Delta, Phi Lambda Phi and 
; Delta Chi. He is associated as as- 
j sistant manager with the Grafton 
! County Electric Eight and Power 
Company of the New England Power 
' Association at Lebanon, X. 11. 

HOME FOR AGED PEOPLE IX 
j WINCHESTER 



& 

funeral Directors 

LADY ASSISTANTS 



SERVICES RENDERED IN ANY PART OF STATE 
TELEPHONES: WINCHESTER 0«3S— 0174— «106 



Service, with us, means anticipating the needs and desires of 
our patrons so that they need not concern themselves about the 
slightest detail beyond telling us their wishes. 

Met-tf 





Lucille Perry Hall 

SCHOOL of DANCING 

Ballet — Tap — Musical Comedy — Ballroom 

Coaching of Amateur Productions 
Dancers Available for Clubs and Entertainments 
Circular sent upon request 
Telephone: Kenmore 61 IS 
12 HUNTINGTON AVE. (Copley S« t .) BOSTON 



In No Way Connected with Charles- 
town Winchester Home for Aged 



The directors 
Aged People in 
state that there 
tween the Home 



of the Home for 
Winchester wish to 
is no connection be- 
and the Charlestown 



Winchester Home for Aged whose 
funds were reported taken by Henry 
<\ Wiley. 

Our Home has never lost a cent 
through its officers. It is not only 
solvent, hut thanks to the support 
received from the citizens of Win- 
chester is steadily increasing in 
and usefulness, 
finance Committee of the 
i insists of 

I ink E. Crawford, President 

.bert E. Fay, Treasurer 
Arthur S Harris 
Francis E. Smith, Secretary 



THE AMERICAN' RED ( ROSS 



Table Linen Towels Curtains 

LAUNDERED JUST RIGHT 

Thanksgiving will *<>«>n be here! That means there 
i- much to he done to prepare for the busy <h«y. 

Semi your Curtains, Table Linen, and 
everything that needs laundering to us. 
We can help you make every room in the 
house spic and span, ready for the holiday. 

CALL WINCHESTER 2100 

ami our man will 
stop at your house. 



\'cw Lnglund 
1 aundr ics.|nc. 



Winchester Laundry Division 

CONVERGE PLACE, WINCHESTER 
LMunderers Cleansers Dyers 



Miss Katherine Shultis, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Newton Shultis of 14 
Winthrop street, will act as an usher 
at the series of four concerts arranged 
hv Connecticut College, at the Lyceum 
Theatre in New Lcndon. Miss Shul- 
tis is a member of the junior class. 



The quota for Winchester Red 
Cross this year is 2000 members. We 
secured this enrollment last year. 
Will the people of Winchester help us 
do it again? The Winchester Chap- 
ter has done and is still doing a great 
deal for the less fortunate citizens 
of the town. Considerable money 
and time has been spent for families 
needing temporary relief and this 
work must go on all winter. 

Part of the $1 membership goes to 1 
the National Organization, but a gift j 
of a larger sum so designated will be 
used to carry on our relief work and j 
bring back a double blessing to our | 
Town of Winchester. Thanksgiving 
is near and beyond that is Christmas | 
— and please remember there are a j 
great many empty coal bins right i 
now. 

Our Treasurer. Mr. Wm. Priest at 
the Winchester Savings Bank will be 
glad to receive donations. Won't | 
you help your Red Cross Chapter go 
over the top and carry on? 

Mrs. Bowen Tufts, Chairman 



$ 



5 



Will put in an elect Mr floor ping 
in any room on the first floor of 
your house. 

E. C. SANDERSON 

THE ELECTRICIAN 
TeL 0300 




For RHEUMATISM take 

BUXTON ' S 

RHEUMATIC SPECIFIC 

You will not regret it. For (ale mt Herey's 
Pharmacy. I. ft us send you a booklet. Buiton 
Rheumatic Medicine Co., Abbot Village, Me. 



i 

I Iff You Like Good Things 
j You'll Buy 

f A. A. MORRISON'S 

• FINE CANDIES 

! and 

| Home-Made Pastries 

j Made in Winchester 
| Fresh Every Day 

! 

Clara Catherine Candies 

A. A. Morrison 
19 MT. VERNON STREET 
TEL. WIN. 0966 



i 



! 



'S MARKET 

75-77 PLEASANT STREET MALDEN 

Importers of 



From Lunhan Bros., Cork, Ireland 

Distributors of 

S. S. PIERCE FANCY GROCERIES 
SWIFT'S GENUINE SPRING LAMB, GOLDEN WEST FOWL, 
PREMIUM CHICKENS, HEAVY WESTERN BEEF, 
NATIVE PORK 

<.2i-tr 



_M 



THAT BLANKETY BLANK FURNACE 
EATS AAORE COAL THAN FOLD'S 
FACTORY I Ad COIN O TO 



PHONE 
0903 

AND GET 

FELLS 

TO SEE WHAT'S THE 
MATTER WITH IT 



Don't (A ESS what i* the matter with your furnace, Phone 
0903 and a*k u* to j:rt on the jol». WE'LL KNOW what the 
trouble is AND WE'LL QUICKLY FIX IT. 



FELLS PLUMBING AND HEATING CO. 

656 MAIN STREET WINCHESTER, MASS. 



ANDERSON MOTOR CO. 

666 MAIN ST., WINCHESTER 
Tel. 1053—1054 

348 MASS. AVE., ARLINGTON 
Tel. 0767 

COME IN AND SEE OUR NEW 

PACKARD S CHRYSLER 

1931 MODELS 

NOW ON DISPLAY 

We give the highest market allowances for cars traded in. 

SEE US FIRST 

We Service All Makes of Cars 

WORK GUARANTEED — REASONABLE PRICES 

Automobile Accessories, Painting, Fender and Body Work, 
Day and Night Washing. 

Visit Our Used Car Department 

We Have All Makes ef Cart at All Price.. 



PHARMACY FIRST 

KNIGHT 

WINCHESTER SQUARE WEST, AT CHURCH STREET 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS.. STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1080 




SIJPEKIOK 

G I en w© oil Features 



J Am torn a I i( ook to al- 
ways give the exact 
baking Iicut. 

^ l \ 1 r;i hcavil) Irmu- 
lali <l in make !«■•.•. t.as 
«1<» more. 

;| LARGE CAPACITY 
OVKM with Two Firm 

< a.>l Iron ttut'ks. 



^ Oven l« scientifically 
ventilated l<» chimnev 
Que. 

Furnished in rlean, 
rustproof enamel in- 
side ami oul ■ t lolors: 
Gray, Green and Old 
Ivory . 

4) Raised port burners 

for greater efficiency. 



| Sturdj Cast Iron legs ||| |, arge r<M „ m Cooklm. 
make tin' Mm wood Top 



In in and rigid. 



Broi I in« i urn pa r! - 
mctit at convenient 
hcighl . 



op with manifold 
pipes conecaled. 

■ It mi \ rnient lint I tin 
" " style Clock linn- 

dies ami l'ii*li Button 

Lighter. 



Ltitire front and cook- 

iiiu lop of durable < .:>t Q Hand; drawer for stor* 
iron, ing Cooking I tonsils. 

• • • for Greater 
Convenience, Comfort, 
Economy and Leisure 




Doubly Insulated 

The walls surrounding DeLuxe Glenwood 
Ovens arc carefully hand packed with mineral 
wool. This "custom-built" method retains 
the heat better than the method used in 
insulating ordinary ranges. 



•>>l>>>l Vr 



"•>n 



Arlington Gas 

527 Main Street, 



Light Company 

Tel. Win. 0112 



John J. Murphy, Dealer in junk of I Big "Jim" Fitzgerald will be back 
All Kinds. Highest prices paid. If ; at his tackle berth for the Fitton A. 
you have anything in this line, tele- C. football team this Sunday against 
phone either Winchester 01)24, 0824-W the Mill-streams after being out of 
or drop a postal to 28 Church street, the lineup for a couple of weeks with 

mh9-tf 1 an infected foot. 



American Legion 
Pre-Armistice Dance 

BY WINCHESTER POST, 97 

Town Hall, November 10, 1930 

EIGHT UNTIL ONE O'CLOCK 

Music by Hennessey's Orchestra 

Tickets $1.25 Per Couple 
FOR SALE AT HEVEY'S DRUG STORE 




CALL MET NOTES 



Calumet teams defeated Towanda 
of Woburn in the Mystic Valley 
League last Monday evening lfi — 11, 
winning on the alleys and pool and 
billiard tables, and losing everything 
at cards. The two clubs were very 
evenly matched except for cards. 
Calumet first team divided honors in 
bowling, losing the second string by 
three points and winning the total 
by an equal number of pins. The 
second team won the first on a roll- 
off and lost the third by two pins. 
Priest was high roller with 135 and 
.'144. Gutters took the straight pool 
match, Hayden the cowboy and Rey- 
nolds the three-cushion contest. To- 
wanda took straight billiards and 
cards. 

The scores: 

Calumet tii Towanda 
CALUMET (tl 

damage 118 98 9S 307 

Priest 98 111 135 844 

K. PurrinRton kh 89 iosi 2X7 

' McGrath 101 98 116 314 

| HiKgiiw xj 98 !'l '^74 



nounced that absolutely no reserva- 
tions will be granted Friday, and 
; those who are inclined to wait until 
I the last minute are going to be out 
of luck. The movies of the parade 
are very fine. 

Owing to the election coming on 
Tuesday this week, the ladies' after- 
; noon bowling was postponed until 
today (Friday). Bowling for the 
ladies takes place every Tuesday af- 
ternoon at 2 ::?(), and already the 
number of ladies who are enjoying 
this healthy exercise and sport are 
growing rapidly in numbers. New 
bowlers are especially invited to take 
part. A special system of handi- 
capping gives them every chance of 
winning the prizes. Guests are wel- 
comed. The committee of ladies in 
charge of the howling is composed 
of Mrs. Vernon H. Hall, Mrs. Forest 
U Pitman and Mrs. Robert E. 
Lincoln. 



E. W. NICHOLSON 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 

We're equipped to handle any 
kind of a plumbing job, big >r 
, small, the public has to offer. 
We do our work well and we do 
it in jig time, too. No waiting 
around for inspiration. Wc will 
do your repair work in a hurry 
and you'll be perfectly willing 
to meet the sort of a bill we'll 
hand you. 

118 WINN STREET, WOBURN 
Tel. Woburn 0899 




Fancy paper napkins, tor bridges 
and luncheons, at the STAR office. 



PeWic 1766 Established 1891 

R. E. BELIVEAU 

Formerly A. E. Ber*-strom 
UPHOLSTERING AND FURNITURE 
REPAIRING 
Cushion, Matt res* and Shad* Work 
KrfinUhinr 
Decorative ( hair. Made to Order 
16 Thompson St. Winchester, Mass. 



DR. CHARLES E. TOZIER WILL 
GIVE TALK 



Citizens Invited 



20 

delivers 
on 

McNeilly's 

Budget 

Plan 




MODEL 70 Lowboy la finished $ 
1» 



4!>l 4X7 

TOWANDA 0> 

I Fox 125 102 

I Bradshaw 112 W 

. Spillsbury «2 H7 

I Luther 10S 108 

; Brown «4 9X 

531 490 

CALUMET (21 

I Goldsmith 112 mo 

i Roesaler 79 121 

D. Priest 84 119 

i N. PurinKton 91 103 

Hildreth 93 106 

459 548 

TOWANDA (21 

Johnson 90 91 

, Odom 89 89 

' Lyons 90 105 

! Kay 87 97 

1 Buekman 103 105 



518 1526 



109 
96 
98 

10X 
91 



836 
298 
2X7 
319 
2X3 



602 1323 



103 
104 
91 

90 
94 



315 
304 
294 
2X4 
292 



4X2 1489 



84 
83 
106 
112 

99 



265 
261 
301 
296 
307 



Golden Voice 

Atwater Kent 

See and hear the new models of Atwater Kent Golden 
Voice radio at McNEILLY'S! They've attained new heights 
of performance, new depths and richness of tone! The new 
tone control gives '4 definite tone shadings! The Quick 
vision dial, allowing instant readings, is the year's out- 
standing advancement! 



WE CAN SERVE YOU BETTER 

S. S. McNeiUy Co. 

547 MAIN ST.. W INCHESTER 

Radio Service on All Makes 



A o- 



Calumet 
Butters . 
Hayden 
Friend 



459 487 



484 1430 
Towanda 



Strait-ht Pool 

78 Irvin 16 

Cowboy Pool 

201 Cook 181 

18-1 B.Ik line Billiards 

75 Buekman 150 

Three Cushion Billiarda 

Reynolds 30 Burlehrh 14 

Cards 



Kelley and 

Pitman 107 

Barry and 

Smith 582 

Kelley and 

Pitman 1095 

Barry and 

Smith 765 



Kowle and 

Dinsmore 
Childs and 

Caulfleld 
Childs and 

Caulfield 
Fowle and 

Dinsmore 



715 
480 



137 



The next match in the league will 
be here at home again, when Calu- 
met will cross swords with the 
strong Middlesex Club of Arlington. 
This organization, the outgrowth of 
the old Arlington Boat Club, has 
good players in every department, 
and interesting contests are antici- 
nated for this c .ming Monday even- 
ing. 

Next r'nday evening. (Nov. 14.) 
there is to be a dinner bridge at the 
club opeing at 6:30 p. m. sharp. As 
an added attraction there will be 
shown moving pictures of Winches- 
ter's big Tercentenary celebration 
and narade. With dinner, bridge and 
moving pictures, the evening's pro- 
gram should be such as to attract 
every member, and it is therefore 
important that all planning to go, 
send their reservation card to the 
committee by Wednesday. It is an- 



Doctor Tozier will present the 
beautiful slides of his much talked 
about trip to Jamaica last summer, 
at the Baptist Church, Friday even- 
ing, Nov. 14 at 8 p. m. The occasion 
is the ladies* night of the Every- 
man's Class. All men of the town 
and their ladies are invited to be 
present and enjoy another of Dr. 
Tozier's rare treats. The subject is 
"The Land of Morgan the Pirate and 
Governor." 

Harry C. Sanborn who was also on 
the trip with Mrs. Sanborn and his 
son, Frederick, will be a partner in 
the presentation and will add to the 
attractiveness of the evening. 

Refreshments will be served at the 
close. This is an occasion that 
should not be missed. Dr. Tozier has 
had numerous requests to show these 
fascinating pictures. 

Miss Joan Harding of Framingham 
formerly of this town, placed fifth in 
the children's horsemanship class at 
the Boston Horse Show last Satur- 
day. 



Give your mother', 
friend or swis't- 
heart a Runnin- 
teetl, sweet sinii- 
intt eanary bird. 
We have Ilnrtz 
Mountain fingers, 
$7.00, irenuine se- 
lected St. Andreas- 
burs with Ion* silvery trills and irrand 
variations, day and niiiht songsters, 19.00. 
Also cages of all descriptions, cat, dog and 
bu d supplies, etc. 




CHAS. LUDLAM 

69 Uromnel.l St. and 20 Boaworth St. 
Tel. LIUerty 93x9 Boston 

Established 1878 




COKE 

$12.00 PER TON 

Stove, Nut and Egg sizes. 
Extra charge for smaller 
quantities. All orders cash. 

FRIZZELL BROS. 

Tel. Woburn 0570 
6 Greenwood Avenue 



FIRST 
M O li T f - \i» K S 

Vie have fund* avail- 
able for liberal first 
mortgages on owner* 1 
homes ... If you are 
- planning to buy, build 
or re-finance — write 
for application blank 
or call at office. 

LAWYERS TITLE 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

Beaton Five ('call Saving* 
Bank Building 

34 School Street, Boston 

m IVtyteaci Liberty a5t»* , 

o24-6t 



Thomas Quigley, Jr. 

••.muter. Contractor an* Stone Maaon 



P1VING. FLOORING. ROOF NG 
In Artificial Stone. Aaphalt 
and All Concrete Products 
Meewalka, DriTewara. Carbine. Hteee, Btc 
Floors for Cellars. Stables. Factories 
and Warehouse* 
Estimate* Furnished 

18 LAKE STREET 



Good's 
Riding School 

Harry Good, Prop. 

Well Broken Homes 
and Ponies 

Personal Saperviifoa 
MAIN STREET MEDFORD 



(Near Oak Gro»« 

TeL Mystic 5802 



■a-tt 



mm - . ^ in Boston 

Money to Loan and vicmty 



AT 



On one and two-family houses preferred. Owner 
and occupant preferred. Applications now being 
taken for loans— not over $8000 to one borrower. 
Money advanced to build. Call personally with 
Deed 



6% 



MERCHANTS Co operative Bank 

24 School Street, Boston, Mass. 



Assets over $30,000,000 



021-131 



STANLEY'S WICKER FURNITURE 

Made to Order in All Sizes 

WOOD BASKETS. FOOT RESTS, PLANT STANDS, WINDOW 
BASKETS AT REASONABLE PRICES 

Repairing Chairs and Baby Carriages 

STANLEY'S 

48 Massachusetts Avenne, Rear East Arlington 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1930 



The Winchester Star 

THEODORE P. WILSON. Editor and 
Publisher: WINCHESTER, MASS. 

Single copies! seven cents 

Left at Your Residence for One Year 
The Winches ter Star. $2..>0. in advance 

News Items, Lodge Meetings, Society 
Events, Personals, etc., sent to this 
Office will be welcomed by the Editor 

Entered it the postoffire at Winchester. 
Massachusetts , as »erond-< lass milter. 

1 ELEPHONE NUMBER 0029 



If the fight staged In connection 
with last Saturday's football game 
between Winchester and Melrose High 
Schools opens the eyes of the Mystic 
Valley League officials to the fact 
that the organization is badly in need 
of more competent officiating, the 
mixup may yet turn out to be a bless- 
ing in disguise. The need for better 
officials is not confined to the Mystic 
League by any means. There seems 
to be a general dearth of capable 
schoolboy arbiters, and this in the 
face of sin ever increasing interest in 
the ■-'.me. With his own better 
knowledge of football the average fan 
is becoming more and more impatient 
with loppy officiating and the school- 
boys, bettor coached and grounded in 
the fundamentals of the game, know 
when tli" contests are not being han- 
dled according to regulation. School- 
boy football is being taken much more 
seriously by many more people than 
formerl; . and so it is the more ur- 
gent i ■ have important games be- 
tween real rival teams handled by 
mi i! not only well versed in rules 
as stated in the rule hook, but also 
al l, to apply the rules instantly as 
occasion 'cmires upon the field of 
play. Winchester and Melrose are 
great rivals, and last Saturday's game 
was one of the objective battles of 
• i,,. correri! Mystic League season. 
Th • officials should have known this, 
and also t i at feeling hetw-trn the 
club wss :.t high pitch. Matters 
should never have been permitted to 
g-> so far between the individual play- 
er- as to precipitate the tight in the 
third quarter which narrowly es- 
caped being a riot, "Dan" Smith, lo- 
cal tackle, was the goat of this par- 
ticular fracas and from the sidelines 
throughout the game previous to the 
scrap, it was apparent that he was 
taking plenty from the visiting play- 
( is. He has taken plenty in most of 
the games this season, and we don't 
denv that there have been times when 
he ha- returned as good as he re- 
ceive 1 On such occasions the offi- 
cials have nevr been bac kward about, 
slapping on penalties, yet they have 
been singularly unobserving in the 
many instance* when the Winchester 
boy has been on the receiving end of 
unnecessarily rough handling. No 
player likes tn think he isn't getting 
a square deal, and no player of Smith's 
abilit> and strength is going to stand 
roughing indefinitely, The Winches- 
ter tackle was doing his l). st tt.-may 
clean, hard football last Saturday. 
Every Mansfield coached boy has to 
do thai if he wants to stay in there. 
He had not drawn a penalty in two 
quarters and during the entire previ- 
ous game had not been penalized. If. 
as claimed by Melrose, he hail been 
guiltv of unnecessary roughness, and 
if, as stated in some press reports of 
the mime, he had been repeatedly 
warm d bv the officials for illegal play- 
ing, then those same officials were lax 
in failing to impose suitable penalties. 
No player should be repeatedly 
warned for unnecessarily rough play- 
ing. Penalties should follow the first 
warning, and must if the game is to 
be kept within bounds. We, of course, 
have the Winchester version of how 
la-:t Saturday's fight started. Person- 
ally we believe it is the correct one. 
We saw two Melrose boys battling 
with Smith, vet neither of them was 
sent from the game. A visiting play- 
er was ordered from the field to be 
sure and presumably he was connect- 
ed with the fracas somehow. If three 
officials, close to play on th" field can 
see only om of three hoys involved in 
a fight, with another, then they have- 
n't the grin they should have on an 
important football game. Winchester 
fans did not resent Smith's being or- 
dered from last Saturday's game, but 
they did resent deeply the fact that 
two Melrose culprits who should have 
accompanied him to the sidelines were 
permitted to remain in action. The 
fact that one of the visitors claimed 

to be trying to ston the fight should 
have been disregarded. It isn't up t 



MANY A MAN 

has said 

"If I had only realized" and 
many a widow has echoed 
"If he had only realized." 



WINCHESTER HARRIERS 
AT HARVARD 



WON 



WILLIAM W. HILL, Agent 

The Northwestern Mutual 
Life Insurance Company 

235 Park Square Building 
Boston 

Phone Hancock 3765— Win. 0118 




INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT 
i HE RED CROSS 



Total expenditures of the Red , 

Cross during the past year amounted done bv Coach "M< 



Took Class B Hiirh School Title with 
"Boh" Winche-ter Individual Star 

Led by Its unbeaten ace. "Bob" 
Winchester, the Winchester High 
School Cross Country team closed a 
most successful season last Saturday 
by winning the Class B Hierh School 
championship in the annual Harvard 
fall interscholastic cross countrv rac- 
ing at Soldiers' Field. Cambridge. 

The local team won from Beverly, 
Concord. Braintree, Cranston. Somer- 
ville, Stoneham and other high 
schools, having the impressive total 
of 62 to 8n for Beverly, its nearest 
rival. 

"Hob" Winchester, undefeated this 
fall and the holder of several course 
records, took the lead in th > Class B 
race at the gun and was never headed. 
The race was over a 2Mi mils course 
around the Stadium and Win he-tor's 
winning time was 13 min. 59 sees, 
t The local youngster was not extended 
to win, finishing a good 50 yards in 
front of Lawrence of Concord who 
was second. 

The contest for indivi lual honors 
! during most of the race was between 
; Winchester and Gilbert of Somerville 
who was literally run into the ground 
by the local boy and fell exhausted 
ten yards from the finish. Lawrence 
of Concord passed Gilbert before he 
could pick himself up and he had to 
be content with third place. 

Stalker i ) f Winchester placed fifth 
and r L'ht behind him came the local 
caj tain, George McCormack. Corby 
of Winchester was lltth, Kenneth 
West, 31st. Bowler, 32nd and little 
"Dick" Pettingell, 35th. 

The announcement that the Win- 
chester team had won was made bo- 
tween the halves of the Winchester 
- Met.-,,.,,, came and was loudly ap- 
pended, all appreciating the fine work 
" Wenner and his 




to $9,250,000. 

The Junior Red Cross has increased 
its membership during the past three 
years from 5,822,757 to 0,930,849. 

Expenditures in the United States 
for unior Red Cross activities last 
year amounted to $260,312.52, 

The Bed Cross nursing service en- 
n llment of nurses now totals 51,047. 
About 27,n00 nurses on this list are 
available for acHve military service. 

During the year 52,798 candidates 
passed the lit'" saving test, in swim- 
ming and were authorized to wear the 
Red' Cross insignia. 

Bed Cross volunteers during the 
year made 192,051 garments and 
3,495,137 surgical dressings. 

The Austrian Bed Cross Society 
observed its 50th anniversary on 
Sept 21 It is eight months to the 
day older than the American Bed 
Cross. 

STMT: FEDERATION MEETS NOV. 
1J \T SOMERVILLE 



The 7th District Conference of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of 
Women's Clubs. Mrs. Carl L. Schrader. 
president, will be held on Friday, Nov. 
14 at 9:45 a. m. at Unitarian Hall. 
Highland avenue. Somerville. The 
Somerville Woman's Club, Mrs Cla- 
rence VV. Sprague, president, Will act 
as hostess, and Mrs. Nathaniel E. 
I Smith, district director, will preside. 
She will respond to the greetings 
brought to the assembly by Hon. John 
J. Murphy, Mayor of Somerville and 
by Mrs. Sprague. 

""Torch-bearers" will be the theme 
of the State chairmen's reports which 
will be followed by round table dis- 
cissions from 12 to 12:40 p. m. 

Luncheon will he served at 1 o clock, 
the tickets for which may be secured 
t rom Mrs. P. Edmund Rose. 

A musical program by the Somer- 
ville Woman's Glee Club will open the 
afternoon session, when "Stepping 
Stones in an Meal Club Life' will be 
the theme for short addresses by Mrs. 
Carl L Schrader. State president; 
Mesdames Frank P. Bennett, Thomas 
I Walker, John J. Kimball. Herman 
\ Harding, vice-presidents; Mrs. Hen- 
rv W Hildreth. recording secretary; 
Mrs. Charles G. Wetherbee, corres- 
ponding secretary; Mrs Charles b. 
Fuller, clerk, and Mrs. Frederick S. 
Davis, treasurer. 

Mrs. Grace Morrison Poole, first 
vice-president of the General Feder- 
ation will be guest of honor. 



offi 



ctais 



, to hold court on a football 
field Any one taking a punch at a 
player, even in the interests of peace, 
should be removed from the game, and 
if this had been done last Saturday, 
an Ugly hangover would have been 
averted, Mystic League football has 
been singularly free from trouble in 
past years, but last Saturday s blow- 
up is* an indication that it is by no 
means trouble proof It's up to the 
officials to guard against the recur- 
rence of such trouble by giving every 
player in the league on every Held 
around the circuit a square deal, and 
no more. And it's up to the heads of 
the league to see to it that those hired 
to officiate the games are as capable 
.is can be procured 01 doing the job 
they're hired for. 



LEGION AUXILIARY OFFICERS 
INSTALLED 



THANKS FOR ELECTION 



Nov. o, 1930 
T'> the Editor of the Star: 
Permit me through your columns 

to exoress my most sincere and heart- 
felt thanks to the many friends whose 
generous support made possible my 
re-election to Congress. 

Very sincerely yours 

Frederick W, Dallinger 



MRS. IDA H. CORNISH 

Mrs. Ida H. (Skilton) Cornish, wife 
of Ri b»rt II. Cornish and mother of 
Mrs. Harold A. Smith of this town 
died Thursday. Nov. tl in Arlington. 
The services will be held this Satur- 
day afternoon at 4 o'clock at the 
Broadway Tabernacle in Now York 
City. 



Diaries at the Star Office. 



Mrs E C. Gihlin of West Roxbury, 
assisted bv Mrs. McGrath of Stone- 
ham as Sergeant -at-Arms, installed 
the officers of the Auxiliary to Win- 
chester Post, 97. American Legion, on 
Wednesday evening at the Post Head- 
quarters on Washington street. 

Officers were installed as follows: 

President Mis. Ruth Nelson 
i<t Viee-Preaident Mrs. Father Lawson 
2n,t Viee-Prrttdent Mrs. Mary Carroll 
Secretary Miss Anna KwmquUt 
Treasurer -Mrs. -Bessie Pierce 
chae lain Mrs. A Reebenacker 
Historian Mrs. Annie Hanlon 
SerKeant-at-Arms Mrs. Mary DeMorrls. 

The speakers were Mrs. Giblin, 
Comndr. Wade L. Grindle of Win- 
chester Post. Vice Commander P. T. 
Foley and Adjutant Harry Goodwin. 
Major Grindle presented to the Aux- 
iliary a handsome silk flag, the gift 
of the Post. 

An entertainment program was 
presented by the Senna Sisters, An- 
na Crowley and Jeannette Hon*, pupils 
of Miss Arlene Cumings of Woburn. 
Refreshments were served. 



WFTL KNOWN ARTIST IN WIN- 
CHESTER FOR THE WINTER 



Mr. and Mrs. Gerrit A. Beneker and 
family of Truro, are occupying the 
Poinier house, 15 Calumet road,, until 
next June. 

Mr. Beneker. an artist of national 
reputation, socnt last winter in Phil- 
adelphia where the owner of a chemi- 
cal plant commissioned him to paint 
a series of portraits of some of the 
older employees who had served so 
long in building up that business. 
These portraits are now hanging in 
the clubhouse for the employees as a 
recognition of service. 

Teehnoloey Review for October fea- 
tured an article bv Mr. Beneker on 
"Art as an Aid to Industry." 



boys during the entire season. 

CONGREGATIONAL WOM EN 
HELD ANNUAL BAZAAR 

The annual fall bazaar of the Wom- 
an's Guild, Mission Union and West- 
em Missionary Society of the First 
Congregational Church was held 
Wednesday from in a. m. until 8 p. 
m. in the parish house under the di- 
rection of Mrs Walter II. Blacke, 
Mrs. Frank II. Kniuht and Mrs. 
Harold A. Smith, general chairmen. 

As usual the small individual rooms 
of the parish house were transformed 
into intriguing little shops with the 
orientals displayed in the spacious 
ladies' parlor. Most of the booths 
were arranged in thi form of a square 
in the upper hall, and Were unique 
little summer houses with black and 
white striped tops and latticed ends, 
gaily decorated with colorful paper 

flowers. 

There were movies for the children 
during the afternoon under th" direc- 
tion of Miss Barbara Fernald and 
from 3 to 5 there was afternoon tea 
in the tea room with Mrs. Percy Bug- 
bee in charge. 

At 6 o'clock the Church Deacons 
and Prudential Committee were hosts 
at an informal reception for Dr. and 
Mrs. Howard ,1. Chidley, in honor of 
the 15 years' successful pastorate of 
Dr. Chidley at the church. 

Following the reception 385 guests 
sat down to the annual parish sup- 
per, served in the large hall of the 
parish house by r. caterer and after 
doing full justice to a tempting menu 
those present were entertained with 
the presentation of three one-act 
plays under the direction of Mr. Clif- 
ford Cunningham. 

The plavs were interesting and 
very well done, the casts being as 
follows: 

Kose Windows (by Ptark Y.Hincl Mrs. 
Rnmas Nickerson Hawkins. Miss Maruery 
Mobbs John H Iris),, Gilbert Potter. 

Taxi Miss Bertha K.lley, Basil Harwell. 

shall We .loin the Ladies (James M. Bar- 
riel Miss Margaret Wyman, Miss Doris 
Law sen. Miss Joy Adriance, Miss Jeanette 
Smith Miss Nina Richardson, Mrs. Dorothy 
Wills. Gilbert Potter. Basil Burwell, Manr.ee 
Dolbier, Kenn.th Hutchinson, Clifford Cun- 
nineham. P, Milne Blanehard. 

Following is the complete list of 
chairmen for the bazaar: 

Advertising Mrs, George F. S. Hai ti, tt 

Hooks. White Elephants Mrs. George Ham- 
ilton, Mrs. Alonso Woodside. 

Candy Mrs. C. Harold Smith 

Children Mrs. J. W. Worthen 

Christmas Wrappings Mrs. Wendall I ray, 
Mrs R, A. Hull. 

Decorations Mrs. K. Ober Pride, Mrs 

Franklin l.ane. 

Food Mrs. Howard Bennett. 

Flowers Mrs. Win, Palmer. 

Crab Mrs. J«m-s S. Allen. 

(lift Mrs. H. H. Ambler. Mrs. W. L. Par- 
sons. 

Housekeepers— Mrs. John Joy. Mrs. Frank 
Rnwe. 

Movies Mis* Barbara Fernald. 

Oriental Mrs. H. F. Mouradian. Mr?. Ro- 
land Simon, Is. 

Supper Mrs. A. S. Dearborn. 

Tea Mrs. Percy Bugbee. 

Treasurer Mrs. James Nowell. 

Tiekets for Supper- Mrs. Fred Scales, Mrs. 
Maurice Brown. 



An Easy Way To Accumulate 
Funds For Your Taxes 

Join one or more of the following classes 

$1.00 CLASS PAYS $50.00 

$2.00 CLASS PAYS $100.00 

$3.00 CLASS PAYS $150.00 

$5.00 CLASS PAYS $250.00 

$10.00 CLASS PAYS $500.00 

Interest added if all payments are made regularly or in advance 



JOIN 



Winchester 

NATIONAL ™ 

Bank 



Mullen of Winchester, Patrolman John 
E. Hanlon of th" Winchester Police 
and Arthur T. O'Leary of Winchester. 

A solid gold chief's badge was pre- 
sented to Chief Rogers by Superin- 
tendent Crowley, on behalf of the 
gathering and Lieut. Robert L. Doug- 
las of the Cambridge Police, Station •'!, 
presented the chief with a gold pen 
and pencil set. A framed photograph 
of the Police Department under the 
late Chief William H. Mcintosh and 
a souvenir program book with a hand 
painted picture of Chief Rogers on the 
title page was presented to the latter 
by Mr. O'Leary, 

Chief Rogers briefly thanked his 
friends for their gifts and expressed 
his appreciation of the spirit which 
had prompted the holding of the ban- 
quet and reception. 

During the evening there was an 
entertainment program, featuring the 
"Hum and Strum Roys," radio artists, 
with Max Ziees, Bennie McLaughlin 
and Tom Currier. Piano selections 
were played by Arthur Crowley and as 
a special feature Superintendent Crow- 
ley sang several Irish songs in his 
own inimitable manner. 

The committee in charge of the ban- 
quet and reception had as chairman 
Arthur T. O'Leary and included 
George M. Bryne, William E. Rams- 
dell. William II. McMullen and John 
E. Hanlon. 



SALVATION ARMY DRIVE 



Publicly expressed fear that the 
winter will witness unprecedented 
scenes of suffering and disaster un- 
less help is enlisted to meet the un- 
employment crisis lends importance 
to the appeal which the Salvation 
Army is now making to the people 
of Winchester for a contribution of 
$2000. This is the annual appeal of 
the Army for funds to help meet the 
expenses of its works of mercy for 
the coming year. 

This year, howevei 
tremely urgent. At 
tions and department 
ates in Greatei 
fit of stricken 



Imagine your embarrassment 

WHEN YOU (5-ET YOUR FIRST GLIMPSE 
OF THE OCCUPANTS OF THE FLIVVER. 
YOU'CE PASSING AT *50" — 




IMAGINE VOI R SURPRISE— to know that TRANSPARENT 
VELVET Dresses and Wraps are not any more difficult to re-finish 
than regular velvet dresses and wraps. 

Any velvet dress or wrap needs very experienced hands and time 
in cleaning and re-finishing, to raise the pile where it has been 
crushed — to remove wrinkles that have become set from pressure. 
Velvet work cannot be rushed through a dry cleansing plant and 
re-finished by novices. Only the most experienced workers in our 
plant are allowed to finish velvets — workers who have been finish- 
ing velvets over a long period of years. 

That is why we experience no difficulty whatever in restoring to 
Transparent Velvet its wonderful new appearance. 

E & R CLEANSING and DYEING COMPANY 

SMART ST. at 209 MASS. AVE. 

TELEPHONES UNIVERSITY 4170-4171-4172 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 
INCORPORATED 1908 



POLICE CHIEF WILLIAM H. ROG- 
ERS FETED 



Police Chief William H. Rogers 
was guest of honor at a complimen- 
tary banquet and reception, tendered 
him last evening in the Hotel Man- 
ger, Boston, by 100 of his close friends. 

Chief Rogers has as his personal 
escort Chief Charles McCauley of the 
Woburn Police Department, and after 
a reception commencing at 6:30 o'clock 
dinner was served at 7. The invited 
guests were Supt. Michael H. Crow- 
ley of the Boston Police Department, 
his son, Arthur Crowley, an officer in 
the Superior Court; George B. Rog- 
ers, brother of Chief Rogers; Judge 
Jesse W. Morton of the Woburn Dis- 
trict Court, Clerk of Court Charles G. 
I.orinir of Woburn. Probation Officer 
John Walsh of Woburn, Senator Cas- 
par G. Bacon. Capt. Daniel J. Canty, 
U. S. A., retired, of Woburn; and J. 
Paul Canty. 

Captain Canty served as toastmas- 
ter and those who responded were 
Judge Morton. Senator Racnn. Rep. 
Thomas R. Bateman of Winchester, 
Clerk of Court Loring, Probation Offi- 
cer Walsh. Chief McCauley of Woburn, 
Capt. Timothy Leahy of the Cam- 
bridge Police Department, George C. 
Gavin of Brookline, Edward H. Kener- 
son of Winchester. Whitfield L. Tuck 
of Winchester. George W. Perkins of 
Boston. William H. Cullinane of Bos- 
ton, William E. Ramsdell of Winches- 
ter, former Selectman Georee M. 
Bryne of Winchester, William H. Mc- 



the need is ex- 
the 24 institu- 
the Army oper- 
Boston for the bene- 
hunianity the Army 
has had steadily increasing demands 
for relief during the past year. The 
industrial depression and widespread 
unemployment have imposed a seri- 
ous strain en its resources. 

It is feared that the winter will be 
will through before the peak of un- 
employment will have been reached 
and that unnrecedented suffering and 
disast< r will be witnessed unless 
steps are taken to enlist immediate 
support. Governor Allen's unemploy- 
ment committee has made it known 
that every agency will be worked to 
the limit' to prevent distress. This 
will mean a steadily increasinr strain 
on the resources of the Salvat'on 
Army until the crisis is passed, be- 
cause of the Army's close touch with 
the poor and suffering and its knowl- 
edge of their needs. 

Onerous contributions at an ear- 
Iv date are earnestly requested so 
that exnense and effort may be saved 
in raisinc the fund. The appeal is 
snonsored bv a strone local comm:t- 
toe headed by Lieut. -Col. Paul B 
Meulton as chairman and with 
Charhs E. Barrett, of the Winches- 
ter Trust Co. a« treasurer. The oth- 
er members of the committee are: 

("torn F Arnold 

it m n il 

r»r Whnr T. Prn« n 
It v. Benjamin P. Rrowne 
Vincent P Clarke 
David H rvreurey 
John F Donaghey 
Wade I Grindle 
Judge Charles N. Harris 
Rev. Truman Hem in way 
fleorpre H. I.nehman 
Howard F. I.unt 
Mr* Christine E, Hayden 
Judge Curtis W. Nash 
Rev. William S. Parker 
Lewi.- Parkhun.t 
Rev. George H. Reed 



N 

0 
W 

I 

N 

E 
F 
F 
E 
C 
T 



Low Evening EXCURSION Fares To 



BOSTON "^RETURN 30 c 

TirkrU good weekday evening* only, on train* from Winchester arriving llo.ton 
6 P. M. or after ; returning, leaving liemton the same evening 
not later than midnight. 

ATTEND HOCKEY GAM£S— THEATRES— DANCES— EXHIBITIONS 
TRAVEL THE MOST ECONOMICAL — RESTFUL — FASTEST WAY — BY TRAIN 

EVENING EXCURSION TICKETS ALSO ON SALE TO BOSTON AND 
RETURN FROM WOBURN 40c 
BUY TICKETS BEFORE BOARDING TRAIN 
Tirkels on Sale in Advance— Ask Your Agent 

BOSTON AND MAINE RAILROAD 



William H. Rogers 
Harry C. Sanltorn 
Mabel W. Stinson 
Rev. J. West Thompson 
Hiida M. Torrop 
Rev John E. Whitney 
T. Price Wilson 
Joseph W. Worthen 

Checks should be sent to 
urer Barrett and other gifts 
to uniformed collectors who 



Treas- 
handed 
should 



have credential 
Col. Moulton. 



letters signed by 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



Mrs. John L. Lobinger of this 
town is serving on the World Friend- 
ship Committee of the Boston Y. W. 
C. A., which is directing several im- 
portant features in connection with 
World Fellowship Week, which is be- 
ing observed Nov. 0-1*3. 

Mrs. William Merrill and daugh- 
ter Ruth of Swampscott and Green- 
field, N. H. were calling on friends 
Monday and stopped in at the Greene 
Fireside for afternoon tea. 

A delegation of police officers un- 
der Chief William H. Rogers and 
Lieut. John A. Harrold acted as es- 
! cort at the funeral last Monday 
| morning of Metropolitan Police Of- 

Ificer Thomas Dwyer of Woburn. 
Patrolman Dwyer was for many 



Established 1918 

Postar Furniture 

Manufacturers 

CABINET MAKING 

UPHOLSTERING 

REPAIRING 

594-596 Main Street 
Winchester, Mass. 

TEL. WIN. 0748 



years a member o* the Metropolitan 
force and was well known in this 
town. 

When in need of help, call on us. 
Expert Radio Service, Automobile re- 
pairing, house-cleaning, garden and 
general work of any description. No 
job too small for our consideration. 
We guarantee all our service. Rea- 
sonable rates. 8 Cross street, Win- 
chester, tel. Win. 0031 -M. • 

Among the recent visitors to Howe 
Caverns, Cobleskill. N. Y., was Town 
Clerk Mabel W. Stinson. 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1930 



■ 



No. 4 

of Facts and Figures 

ABOUT 

Co-Operative Banks 

V\ hile the ~i/<- of a financial institution i- not the most 
important factor thai might !><■ cited, yet it i- interesting to 
note that there are eighty-nine institutions of our type in 
the I uited States with individual assets exceeding ten mil- 
lion dollar'-. 

Of tlii* group of eighty-nine institutions, «i\ are Co* 
operative Banks located in Massachusetts. 

Current reports -how thai each and every Co-operative 
Hank in Massachusetts is sound and strong,— a worth) de- 
pository for the investment of savings. 

(il IJ >ll \ RES VRE PA'i IV, 5//,'< 



Winchester Co-operative Bank 

11 Church Street, Winchester Telephone 1078 



Willard T. Carleton 
John Challis 
Finest B. Kustis 
Vincent Farnsworth 
George A. Female! 



DIRECTORS 
James J. Fitzgerald 
Charles A. (Reason 
Daniel W. Hawes 
Alfred H. Hildreth 
James Hinds 



Raymond Merrill 
Curtis W. Nash 
Sewall E. Newman 
Frank K. Randall 
Samuel S. Svmmes 



SUNDAY SERVICES 



FIRST HAITIST CHURCH 

Rer. Uenjamin P, bruwnv. l'aator, 31 Church 
street. 



I. ru*s. 



Sunday, Nov, 9. 9:30 A. M. - Church School. 
Cluaei for alt ages. 

'.': !» A. M. Everyman*! Class in six-ial hall. 

l'):4.0 A. M. Morninir worship. Sermon 
hy Ktv. J. Greahem Machen, l> !>■ Music by 
quartet and senior and junior choirs 

5 P. M. — "Comrades of t 
er. Barbara Berry. 

6 P. M. Y. P. S. C. V. 
Lindaay. Subject, "What I> 
Mean *."' 

7 P. M. Evening worship. 
Greahem Meehen, D.D. 

Monday, Nov. 10 at 6 P. M. 
Workers' Union. Ford Hall. 



U 



Lead- 



Borden 
it rhoovl 



Sermon hy J. 

Boston Baptist 
Speaker, Rev. 



The Creed of 



Ambrose Bailey, Subject, 
Sunday School Teacher." 

Tuesday. Nov 11 at 3:30 P. M. Junior 
Christian Endeavor. Leader, ".lack" Finger. 

Wednesday, Nov. vi at 7 ■ i r. p, m. Prayer 
meeting. Led by the pastor. Subject, "What 
Do.-, It Mean t>. be a Christian?" 

Friday, Nov. n «t 8 l» M. Ladies' night 
social of Everyman's Class. 



Rev 
field i 



UNITARIAN CHURCH 

George Male Reed, Minister, 
oad. Tel. Win. U424. 



H Ridge- 



LOST AND FOUXD 



MISCELLANEOUS 



LOST A Bpotted yellow cat with boh tail. 
Return to 1 Uonard road or call Win, Ub'JH. • 

LOST II Hi" person taken scooter bike 
from in front id Carl Larson's shop, will re- 
turn mime, there, nothing further will be done 
about it or tel. Win. 0634.R. 



WANTED I'osition by middle aged woman 
as companion-attendant, or housekeeper to 
elderly person or couple, pleasant home of 
more consequence than salary. Tel. Win. 
1U65-M. • 



Sunday, Nov. '.• Public service of worship 
at 10:45. Mr. Reed will preach. Subject. 
' Remobilization," a sermon for the Sunday be- 
fore Armistice Day. The primary department 
of the Sunday School, including the kinder- 
garten throuKh the third grade, will meet at 
m:,... 'fbe junior department, including the 
fourth grade through the eighth, will meet 
at 9:30. The Metcaif Union will meet in the 
Meyer Chapel at 

The music for the morning service will be 
as follows; 

Organ Prelude- Allegretto from Symphony in j 

I' Minor Cesar Kranck ' 

Anthem Finale Harris . 

Alitnem Radiant Morn Woodward 

Organ Postlude O Love Divine 

J. Sebastian Matthews i 

Wednesday, Nov. 12— Sewing meeting in j 
the morning. 

Wednesday, Nov. 12 The Activities' Com- i 
mittee presents Miss Sylvia 1'arker in a pro- 
gram of readings, in Metcaif Hall at 2 :30 I 
p. in. Tea will be served. 

Thursday. Nov. IS Annual supper and i 
meeting of the parish. Supper will be served j 
at 6:45 and the meeting will start at 8 p. m. ! 
It is earnestly ho|«-d that every member will ' 
be present. 

The services in Kinit'.s Chapel, Boston, Nov. 
11-11, will be in charge of the Rev. Warren 
S. Vrchibald, The South Church. Hartford, 
Conn. 

SECOND CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

Rev. John E. Whitley, Pastor. au< Wash- 
ington sire, t. Tel. Win. 076li-J. 



HELP WANTED 



POSITION WANTED Competent chauffeur 
• desires position, can make own repairs, handy 
I about house and garden, willing worker. Tel. 
I W in. 0O31-M. • 



WANTED 

IA66-W. 



Mothi 



helper. 



Tel. Win. 



WANTED <; 

.ad. Miss Tie 



ace near Sheffield 
lei. Win. no.",::. • 



WANTED Thoroughly experienced maid 
for general housework, must In- good cook, 
references required. Mrs. Wm. Edlefson, 
:;il Cabot sired, tel. Win. 0700. 

REAL ESTATE SALESMAN 

WANTED — A man with personality and j 
character qualiflril to sell home sites in a ; 
year round community and highly successful j 
development on the North Shore. Reply in . 
writing Kivinn full reference, experience, and ' 
age. Information strictly confidential. Write 
BOX I < STAR OFFICE. • 



POSITION WANTED Finnish woman de 
sires day work. Tel. Woburn 0849-M. 



POSITION WANTED Reliable woman 
would like work evenings caring for children. 
Call Mystic 2715-J. n"-2t* 



I'OSITION WANTED — General housework 
or mothers' helper, position wanted for capa- 
ble young mil. Address Star Office llox Ol. 



Sunday. 10:30 A. M. Four years in new 



12 M. Sunday School. Miss Marion Vaughn 
representing the New England Home for Little 
Wanderers will speak to the Sunday School 
on Sunday, Nov. :i Everyone invited in the 
assembly hall. 

7 1'. M Observance of Armistice Day. 
Speaker, Chaplain Scott of Navy Yard. 

The church i~ observing its fourth year in 
the new church. Nov. 9, morning service. 

Wednesday, 7:46 I'. M. Continuation of a 
study of the Commandments. Anyone is in- 
vited. 

Friday Ladies' Bethany Society sale and 
supper. 

Tuesday, Nov. 11 is Armistice Day. Church 
service, Sunday. 7 p. m., Nov. 9. An address 
b> Chi plain Scott of Navy Yard. 



MUST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 

All Seats Free 



WINCHESTER TRUST COMPANY 

WINCHESTER MASS. 




MEMBER OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



CONDENSED STATEMENT 

as rendered to the Comptroller as of the close of Business Sept. 24, 1930 



RESOURCES 
("ash and Duo from Hanks.. $ 197,428.13 

U. S. Bonds i . . . 2UU70.9I 

Other Stocks and Honds ... I,099.b80..i9 

Loans and Discounts 1,113.400.81 

Hanking House 62,309.36 



LIABILITIES 

Capital $ 100.000.00 

Surplus and Profits 282.324.79 

Reserve for Taxes and In- 
terest 11.. ■.oo.oo 

Reserve for Amortization 

and Depreciation 32,727.95 

Deposits. Commercial 1,163,169.10 

Deposits. Savings 1.102,ofi8.29 



$2,692,390.23 



$2,692,390.23 

Officers 

RALPH E. JOSLIN, President CHARLES E. BAR RETT, Treasurer 

FREELAND E. HOVEY, Vice President G. DWIGHT CABOT, Assistant Treasurer 
FRED L. PATTEE, Vice President HELEN M. MONROE, Assistant Treasurer 



CHARLES E. BARRETT 
CUTLER B. DOWNER 
JK.RE A. DOWNS 
GEORGE A. FERNALD 
HENRY C. GUERNSEY 



Directors 

H. WADSWORTH BIGHT 
FREELAND E. HOVEY 
RALPH E. JOSLIN 
JAMES NOWELL 



WILLIAM L. PARSONS 
FRED L. PATTEE 
EDWIN R. ROONEY 
FREDERIC S. SNYDER 
CHARLES H. SYMMES 



GLEN WOOD CONTIUALLY 
BRINGING OUT NEW 
COOKING HELPS 



TO LET 



— i 



FOR RENT Stall in private Karaite. Wiish- 
InKtou street, near center. Tel. Win. 1326. 

o3-tf 



FOR RENT Six room apartment and nun- 
garage if desired on Turk 



LANDSCAPE PLANTING 
SHRUBS AND TREES 
at the Melroae Nurseries 

A. M. TUTTLE & CO. 

2S1 Howard Street, 
Melroae Highland! Mih. 
Tel. Melroae 0042 - 

mhlS-tf 



\l 



Sunday. Nov, Subject, "Adam and Fallen 



Sunday Sell. ml at 12 o'clock. 

Seniles in tin. Church liuildintt opposite the 
Town Hall. I": I.", A. M. 

Wednesday evening meeting at 7:45 r. M. 

Rending room in Church Building. Open 
daily from 12 M. to 5 I'. M. except Sundays 
ii nil holidays. 



purl . . 

avenue. Tel. Win. 1836-M. 



olO-tf 



TO LET Private family desires a refined 
Pining uiiedt. beautiful, convenient location. 
Tel. Win. 1224-M. • 



FOR RF.NT Pleasant mum with fireplace 
In attractive home, private family, location 
central, couple or business woman preferred. 
Tel. Will. 0768. • 



FOR RENT Pleasant well heated room with 
or without kitchen nette, centrally located. 
Tel. Win. 0816-W. * 

FOR RENT Upper apartment of six rooms 
arid sun parlor. 4 Park road. Tel. Win. 
0201). W. * 



First Class Upholstering 

SLIP COVERS MADE TO ORDER 
MATTRESSES 
Repair Work a Specialty 

H. J. ROSCOE 

38 CHESTNUT RI>. STONEHAM 

Telephone 0472-W 
Reference ap8-tf 



TO LET Large room furnished or unfur- 
nished: no other roomers; very central. 12 
Elm street. * 



TO LET Mod, 
irable neighbor!) 
uad. Tel. Wm. 



fiv. 



i»m apartment, tie- 
to heat, it Park 



ONE, TWO AND THREE ROOM 

Apartments in Stetson Hall 

Now ready for orcupanry. Rent Its 
to two per month. Every modern con- 
venience, including elevator and re~ 
frigeraion. APPLY TO THE JANITOR. 



FOR SALE 



FIREPLACE WOOD!!! 

4 foot lengths (per cord) ...$18.00 

Cut any length (extra) 2.00 

$20.00 

Hard mountain growth dried under 
cover. Also, kindl<ng wood. $14.00 
and SIK.OO. ROGER S. HE ATT IE, 
tel. Wob. 0439. au29-tf 

FIREPLACE WOOD 

VERY FANCY, all cleft good sized white birrh 
IIS per cord. 4 ft. lengths; $20 sawed; maple 
and oak 116 per cord, 4 ft. lengths, tin 
sawed: kindling wood 6 bu. 11: 2d bu. $3; 
:t.'i bu. 16. All wood may be seen in yard at 
r,2 High street. Woburn. Frlliell tiros., tel. 
Woburn 0.'i70. sl2-tf 



ICE 

HORN POND ICE COMPANY 
Tel. Woburn 0310 



CHURCH OF THE EPIPHANY 

'I lie Rev. Truman Heminway, B.D., Rector 
I I , Win l»22. 

'<■"> ss lie!,,, I'. I ,in,e, Win. Utile. 

1'nii.li limine, Win. 11)22. 

Nov. 0 21st Sunday after Trinity. 

Holy Communion, s a. m. 

Chinch School, 0:3(1 a. m. Dedication of 

new Teachers- 
Morning prayer. 11 a. ni. 
Kindergarten and primary department, 11 

a. m. 

Evening prayer, 6 p. m. 

Tuesday, Nov, 11 Holy Communion 9:30 
n. m. 

Meetings 

Wednesday, Nov. 12. 7:80 p. m. Evening 
Branch whist party. 

Friday, Nov. 14, 10:15 a. ro. Mrs. Nicholas 
Hurke on The Life of Prayer." 

( rim fed Memorial 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL < III lt< II 

Corner Church and Dix streets. Rev J. 
West Thompson, Minister. Residence, 30 i)ix 
street. Tel. Win. 0639-M. 



Church School at 9:3(1. Men's Class taught 
by Prof. Kenneth Reynolds. Other well 
equipped classes for all ages and a cordial 

| welcome. Young People's Class tauk'ht by Mrs. 

I Lamont. 



For many years the name Glen- 
j wood has stood for the highest quali- 
| ty in gas ranges, antl the latest pro- 
' duct of which Glenwood is justly 
proud is the new deluxe insulated 
i Glenwood pas range, This fine gas 
range was designed especially to 
make the tiresome task of cooking 
! one meal after another ever p<> much 
j easier. In the first place the insu- 
! lated oven is mote economical — it 
! makes less pas do more with greater 
! comfort. It assures an exactness of 
I oven heat impossible to obtain by 
i other methods. It makes gas the 
1 "better" cooking fuel. Then there's 
the Automati-Cook, which is in reali- 
I ty an automoatic temperature con- 
trol. This device maintains at all 
i times the temperature at which you 
set it. 

j Top cooking has been perfected by 
a new Glenwood invention, the Our- 
wav Patened enclosed cooking top 
that gives a smooth table-like sur- 
I face, increasing the cooking area and 
1 concealing the pas flames so you'd 
hardly know that they were burning. 

The latest development is the au- 
tomatic pas time control, a very in- 
genious device which removes the 
element of chance in cooking. If you 
want a certain dish cooked a certain 
number of minutes, then, the pas 
time control will shut off the pas at 




Announcing 

The Appointment 



of 



Morning worship at 10:30. Sermon sub- ! the predetermined time, should you 

I ject, "True and False Relations to Hod." , forget all about it, or should you be 



Epworth League at 6 o'clock. The general „»..{„„:.„ urvnrsnlf elsewhere 
j subject is, "Right and Wrong." Topic for , ^enjoyin S yOUl S( It I IS «ncn 

discussion is -What is Conscience?" Lead- I These fine ranges of today are 



are tre- 



enceV" Lead- 

i, Marion Hatch and Fern Tremberth. All mendously improved in construction. 



CHICHESTER S PILLS 

THE U1AMOND BRAND. 
Ladled Ask J err Wrantli 
Chl-ehea-ter a Dlan«d ill 



the young people are invited 
Monday The 



FOR SALE 

Toy Black and Tan Puppies 

Sired hy Firefly, a (> -pound Blue 

ribbon winner. 
ASPIN W ALL 324 8— »( )ST< ) N * 




rill. In Red ud V 

boiet. tested with " 



Take a* 

DUdVoN 




...... B» tr mr Z 

A.k'tt iri-t trV.H-TKR a 



II1B BRAND FILLS, for St 
von known m BeM. S»n»t.AI»«v«Reli«l M 

SOLD BY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE 

ie6-lyr 



THREE PLY ROLL ROOFING 

$1.25 SLATE SURFACED 

Ashpalt Shingles $3.00 a square and up 

Black Sheet Steel Ash Cans 60c each 

Fist White Paint $100 per gallon 

Hard Dry Cord Wood $16.00 per eord 

H. M. ALPERIN * CO. 
527 Concord Ave. Cambridge, Masa. 

Tel. Porter 1580— University S8HS 

»3i-i:it 

MORTGAGEE'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE 



Even the interior unseen over parts 

November meeting of the of- . , m „tr«i "lie 

filial board will be held in the church parlor are entirely enameled to make i»c 

at 7 This is the last meeting before the Luxe" GlenWOods rust-proof and 

quarterly conference. i lastinir 

i Tuesday The next session of the Epworth , " i„_n ...^mon W discovered 

I League Institute will be held in South Tewks- ! The modem Woman tKlS fllSCOVirtll 

bury beginning with the supper at fi :45. that to make her Kitchen attractive 

Wednesday A business meeting of the am i nn-to-date. first, it is necessary 

! ncin. "sr.;?* * o ! d '^ 9hio ^ d ZTC 

o'clock. The pledges for the year will be made with one more pleasinjr in fiesitrn, 
at this meeting. one that will harmonize with the dec- 

wint n held y .t P 7 r f4 y 5 er Tb r e VC uU't LV,^' native scheme she has planed. In- 
in Forgiveness." Can we forgive those who I sutat»>d Glenw I Del uxe fras rantres 
are unrepentant" j arp finished in prev and white, preen 

Thursday The Ladies' Aid Society will hold ; nn i ; vnrv or entire ivorv enamel. 

a lusin^s meeting in the ladies' parlor at Jtn yd SeO these new Colors, it's 
Thursday The rehearsal of the 'unior choir I easv to visualize which will look best 
WHJ be held at 8:46 instead of Friday this | j„ vour kitchen. 

It's certainly worthwhile to know 



week. 
Friday 



The annual church lair will he 



held in the parlors and vestry oi the church 
from 10 o'clock in the morning throughout 
the day and evening. 



FURNITURE FOR SALE 

MAHOGANY DINING ROOM SET 
and other house furnishings in ex- 
cellent condition at low price to set- 
tle estate. Call WIN. 0728-W or ap- 
ply 132 FOREST STREET evenings.* 

FOR SALE Apples. Macintosh Reds, Bald- 
win and Northern Spy. Walter H. Dotten. 
10 Alben street, Winchester. Tel. 0726. s5-tf 

FOR SA1.E Kerry blue pup. 3 months' 
old from Champion stock. M. J. Qllinn, 4 
llammet street, Ipswich. o31-2t 



FOR SALE Service hot water heater $5; 
Mahogany victrola |2S. Tel. Win. 1573. • 

FOR SALE Andes Gas range with side ' 
even, in good condition. Inquire 4 Meadow- j 
croft road. • j 

FOk SALE A Castle Crawford Combina- ' 

lion Range. Tel. Win. 2024-J._ * 

MISCELLANEOUS 



CURTAINS AND DRAPERIES - All kinds 
nsade to order. We do hemstitching. Perry, 
1« Tleasant street. Medford. Tel. Mystic 
M7U. n g.tf 



SECOND MORTGAGE LOA>s made from 
our own funds We also buy mortgage notes 
or lend on them aa collatersl. We are not 
broken and your dealings are solely with as. 



By virtue of the power of sale contained in 
a ci rtain mortgage deed given by Thomas S. 
Richardson and charlotte M. L. Richardson, 
husband and wife, of Winchester, Massachu- 
setts, to the Pioneer Cooperative Hank, of 
Boston, Massachusetts, dated April 7th. 1930, 
and recorded with Middlesex South District 
Deeds, Book .M«'J. Page ud, for breach of the 
conditions contained in said mortgage and 
for the purpose of foreclosing the same will 
lie sold at public auction upon the premises 
described in said mortgage on Saturday, No- 
vember 16th, l'.(30. at half past nine o'clock 
in the forenoon, all and singular the premises 
described in said mortgage, viz the land in 
said Winchester with the buildings thereon, 
being lots 168 and ICS Harvard Street, as 
shown on a Plan of Land in Winchester, 
Mass.. belonging to ti. Edward Smith, dated 
May 2*'th. 1W1, and recorded with Middlesex 
South District Deeds, Book of plans 70, Plan 
48, bounded and described as follows: North- 
easterly by Harvard Street, seventy (70) 
feet; Southeasterly by lots 170 snd 171 as 
shown on said plan, eighty-three iS3i feeti 
Southwesterly by land of owners unknown, 
seventy (7(U feet' and Northwesterly by lot 
154 on said plan, eighty-three it>3i feet. Sub- 
ject to restrictions of record so far as now 
in force and applicable. For our title see 
Hook 4H7fi, Page 481, and Hook 1«27, Page 

Said premises will be sold subject to any 
and all unpaid taxes, tax titles. Special muni- 
cipal assessments, and unpaid water bills. 
Three Hundred Dollars to be paid by pur- 
chaser in cash at time and place of sale 
Further terms to be announced nt the time 
and place of sale. 

PIONEER CO-OPERATIVE HANK. 

Mortgagee 

Hy William D. Ehlredge. Treasurer 
36 Bromfield Street. Boston 
Walter H snd Paul B. Roberts. Attys., 

31 btate Street, Boston o24-3t 



I FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

i Rev. Howard j. Chidny. D.D., Minister. 
Residence, Fernway. Tel. Win. 0071 
Mr. Jay A. Wabcke. assistant. 



Morning worship at 10:30. Dr. Chidley will 
j continue his sermons on the 2:trd Psalm, 
preaching on "The Light in the Valley." 
Children's sermon, "The Dog Fight." 

Sunday School Visitors are always wel- 
come. The departments meet as follows: 
10:110 to 11:46, kindergarten and primary de- 
partments: 9:20 to 10:20, junior department, 
grades 4. S and 6. Ripley Chapel: 12 to 1. 
intermediate and senior departments, grades 
7 and fi and hiirh school. Ripley Chapel. 

The Young People's Society will meet in 
Hip by Chapel at fi p m. The leader will be 
William Gllpatric and the speaker is William 
Higgins on "Home and Parents." All young 
It". I le are invited. 

Sunday morning, Nov. lfi the Sacrament of 
the Lord's Supper will be observed and new 
memcers will be received. Dr. Chidley will 
continue his series of sermons on the 23rd 
Psalm speaking on "The Table in the Charm.-d 
Circle. 

Preparatory lecture. Wednesday evening at 
i :4B in Ripley Chapel. Mr. Wabeke will give 
this preparatory lecture. The Florida Jubilee 

singers win sing plantation Melodies at this 

service. AH welcome. 

Men's Club dinner. Nov. 20 at 8:30 in parish 

house. 



about all these modern cookinpr ad- 
vantages that are now featured at 
the Arlington Gas Lieht Company. 



Henry Billauer 

From a family of Jewelers for over a Hundred Years 
327 MAIN STREET WOBURN 



as an 

Authorized Virgin Diamond Dealer 

Qualified and Selected as a Representative 
of this Syndicate Through a Thorough Knowl- 
edge of Diamonds .... ami an Established 
Reputation for Honesty and Square Dealing. 

Certified Virgin Diamonds arc genuine dia- 
monds direct from the mines to you. never 
fore individually owned or worn, and sold only 
through authorized dealers at standard prices. 

VIRGIN DIAMOND SYNDICATE 

Holland Office: 47 Sarphatistraat 
Amsterdam, Holland 



Tax Collector Nathaniel M. Nichols 
reports that at closing time last Sat- 
urday evening he had gotten in more 
than a half a million dollars About 
$3000 came over the counter in cash 
payments last Saturday night dur- 
ing the extra hour the collector's of- 
fice was open for the taxpayer's 
convenience. 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 

Reginning Sunday. Nov. 2, children 
hetwren the ages of 9 and 12 years 
mav ride all over the Eastern Massa- 
chusetts Street Railway svstem for 
• r 0 cents on tickets that will be good 
only on day of issue. Eor more than 
two years the street railwav has had 
in effect a $1 Ride All Day Ticket and 
has permitted children under 12 
years of age to ride for 50 cents 
when accompanied by an adult. This 
restriction has now been removed. 

Among those who went on from 
Winchester to South Newb'irv. N. H. 
for the wedding of Miss Ruth Shtil- 
tis to Walter Wurth on last Satur- 
day afternoon were Mr. and Mrs. 
lohn A. Finp-c-r. their daughter, M'ss 
MarjVrie. and son, John. Mrs. Dr. 
Lowell and Captain and Mrs. Loren- 
zo Crowell. 

Along with the State politics dis- 
cussed at the Town Hall during elec- 
tion Tuesday there was an occasional 
dash of gossip frrm the local politi- 
cal arena which came to the ears of 
th« STAR. It was rumored about the 
hall that former Selectman Dr. J. 
Harper Blaisdell will be a candidate 
for the Board in March and that 
former Commander W. E. Ramsdell 
of Winchester Legion will also be a 
candidate. It is also said that all 



the present Selectmen are to run 
again and such being the case, we 
may expect lively times in March. 

Miss Anne Simpson, who is attend- 
ing school at "House-in- the-Pines," 
Norton, spent the past week-end with 
her parents on Wedgemere avenue. 

Miss Mildred Ghirardini of Wedge- 
mere avenue entertained 16 friends at 
a birthday party last week, and the ! 
week previous the Misses Alice and 
Helen Ghirardini had 50 guests for 
dancing and bridge with a buffet sup- 
per. 

Clifton "Buz" McNeil, ex-tackle on 
the high school eleven, has a former 
opponent, Ralph Field of Watertown, 
playing with him at the tackle berths 
on the New Hampton Prep football 
team this fall. Ralph Simonds of Ar- 
lington, Jerry Lord of Melrose. Harry 
Sawyer of Watertown and Jim Haley 
of Winchester are other former Mys- 
tic leaguers on the team. 

Miss Lois Gibson, high school li- 
brarian, has started a group of as- 
sistants in order to give the pupils ex- 
perience in library work. These as- 
sistants are to have charge of the 
desk during their free periods and 
check the books in and out besides do- 
ing many of the librarian's other du- 
ties. 

Miss Helen- Bidwell of Scarsdale. N. 



SNOWFLAKE GARDENS 

Hsltir K. Snow, Prop. 
39 FOREST ST. TKL. WIN. 1018—10*7 

Rock Gardens Constructed and 
Planted. Planting of Evergreens 
and ShruhH. Perennial and Alpine 
Plants for Sale. 

called back for the final tryouts of 
the All Boston Public School Honorary 
Field Hockey Team. 

Mr. Edward Bergstrom returned to 
Winchester last week after spending 
a year in Sweden. He found business 
conditions there the same as in this 
country with many unemployed. 

Mr. Edward A. McKenzie of New 
York City has been visiting his pa- 
rents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward McKen- 
zie of Hemingway street. 

Miss Ruth Kingsbury of this town 
is chairman of Radcliffe Night, which 
will be put on by Radcliffe College at 
the meeting of the Friday evening 
student club in Union Congregational 
Church this evening. A miscellan- 
eous program of features and stunts 
such as college girls are capable of 
wi'l be put on for the enjoyment of 
more than 200 students. 

The Fire Department was called 
at 1 :42 yesterday afternoon to put 
out a pile of burning leaves on the 



Y., is now making her home with Miss Skillings estate at Mt. Vernon and 
Mary Cutter in Winchester. Both Washington streets, 
girls are attending Sargeant School. Parchment paper and envelopes to 

Janet and Carolyn Nichols have been | match C'Jc at the Star Office. 



6 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 7. 1930 



I 



ft 



I 

1 

i 



1 



i 



CARTER & YOUNG COMPANY 




Sixth Anniversary Food Sale 

Tremendous Special Purchases of New Merchandise on Sale at Great Savings Throughout the Store from 

NOVEMBER 7th to 15th INCLUSIVE 



WHEN LOOKING FOR A CHOICE 

Ham or Bacon 

TRY 

T. I. REED'S 

BEST BURLINGTON SUGAR CURED 
A FLAVOR OF ITS OWN 



MONARCH BRANDS 

Monarch Sweet Peas, 5 cans $1.00 

Monarch Golden Maize Corn, 5 cans 1.00 

Monarch Green Cut Beans, 5 cans 1.00 

Monarch Wax Cut Beans, 5 cans 1.00 

Monarch Peaches, 4 cans 1.00 

Monarch Bartlett Pears, 3 cans 1.00 

Monarch Raspberries, 6 cans 2.00 

Monarch Blackberries, 4 cans 1.00 

Monarch Raspberry and Strawberry Jam, 3 cans 1.00 

Monarch Peanut Butter, 1 -lb. jar 25 



/feres QtiAlUY-p/i/s/ 



TRY 

Wonder Fiff-teens 

HEAT 'EM and EAT 'EM 
10c 

Fifteen delicious old fashioned biscuits 



ORDER NOW FOR THANKSGIVING 

Monarch Mince Meat, 2-Ib. jar 



.49 




GlassGui* 



>aucer 



Reid Murdoch Co. 



Chanticleer Chicken 

The Most Delicious Tasting Chicken — None Better at Any Price 
"IT TASTES AS GOOD AS IT LOOKS" 
Chicken Broth With Rice— 2 Cans 25c 



Wales Home-Made Jellies 

NONE BETTER 

Famous for Quality Since 1865 
3 JARS FOR 89c 
Place Your Order Today 



\X/|7 are proud of the fact that 
▼ V Hi we carry the Highest Quality 
of Meats and Poultry. The success of 
your Thanksgiving Dinner will be as- 
sured if your purchases are made here. 

CARTER & YOUNG CO. 
GEESE — DUCKS — TURKEYS 
CHICKENS 



Forty -Five Years 

HAMPDEN CREAM HAS BEEN THE 
STANDARD TABLE CREAM 
OF NEW ENGLAND 

Hampden Creamery Company 

EVERETT, MASS. 
TEL. EVERETT 0150—3575 



W. W. Carter F. A. Young 

Fell's Market 

539 MAIN STREET, WINCHESTER 

Telephones: Winchester 0991, 0992, 0976 

Leg and Loin Lamb, lb $ .29 

Leg Lamb, lb 32 

Forequarter Lamb, lb 15 

Chickens for Roasting, 5-lb. av., lb 39 

Large Fowl, lb 39 

Small Fowl, lb 35 

Broilers, lb 35 

Boneless Sirloin Roast, lb 49 

Pork Loins, lb 29 

Reed's Hams, lb 33 

Iceberg Lettuce, 15c each, 2 for 25 

Onions, 8 lbs. for 25 

Sweet Potatoes, 8 lbs. for 25 

Whole Squash, lb 02 

Yellow Turnips. 6 lbs 25 

Native Celery, 15c each, 2 for 25 

Baldwin Apples, pk 35 

Rinso, pkg 19 

Large Lux, pkg 21 

Large Kelloggs Bran, pkg 21 

Shredded Wheat, pkg 10 

King Arthur Flour, 24</ 2 -lb. bag 1.15 

Tea Garden Figs, 3 jars 99 

(Splendid at breakfast time with cream) 

New California Walnuts, lb 35 

Hostess Canada Dry, doz 1.95 

Artichoke Heads are fine in salads, 8 oz 59 

I LB. BETTER COFFEE UCT ^Jk _ 

JAR HEAVY CREAM NET 0*10 

I 



CDC C Wi {k^fidcJ^Surc has e 

CAIN S Maydhnaise 

or Sandwich Spread 

both For ^ ^ 





CAIN S Mayonnaise 



ORDER A JAR TODAY 



DRAKE'S 




CAKE, 




NOBLE'S MILK 



All From Tuberculin Tested Herds 



FOR YOUR FOUR O'CLOCK TEA 

"Pekoe Buds" 

DELANO POTTER COMPANY, BOSTON 



AT YOUR NEXT BRIDGE TEA SERVE 

Dorothy English Muffins 

Delicious With Marmalade, Currant Jelly or Maple Syrup 
FRESH DAILY AT CARTER AND YOUNG COMPANY 



.. 4 port ol I VI HY COOl) Ml Al. 



Come in and try a cup of our delicious coffee on demonstration 



1 

i 



i 
i 



i 
i 

i 

•3: 

I 
i 



1 

| 

1 



Peterson's Salted Nuts 

Peterson's Flavor Toasted Pecans, 13-oz. tin $1.19 

Peterson's Flavor Toasted Almonds, 13-oz. tin 1.19 

Peterson's Flavor Toasted Salted Mixed, 13-oz. tin 1.19 

Jars Assorted Nuts 69 |j 

Our Table Brand 

5 Cans Peas for $1.00 

5 Cans Cut String Beans 99 

5 Cans Cut Wax Beans 99 

New English Walnut Meats, lb 69 

Smoked Sardines, 2 cans 25 

Webster Thomas Co. 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1930 



7 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



Mr. ami Mrs. W. H. McGill of Ox- 
ford street left Tuesday to spend a 
few weeks at Mrs. McGill's former 
home in North I)akota. 

The Fire Department was called at 
10:29 Monday morning by an alarm 
from Box 25 to put out a tire in a 
Chevrolet truck on Main street at Mt. 
Pleasant street. The trucK, owned by 



the South End Hardware Company of 

Boston, was not badly damaged. Tues- 
day morning at 10:24 the men were 
called by telephone to put out a fire 
in the boiler room of the Winchester 
Buick Company on upper Main street. 
The fire was confined to the front of 
the coal bins and did little damage. 



Back Gammon sets at the STAR 
office. 



Your Heating System can be 
Modernized for a Very 
Modest Outlay 

If you are not getting complete heating satisfaction 
from your present equipment, our engineer will call at 
your convenience, make the necessary recommendations 
and furnish estimate of cost at no expense to you. 

RIDEOUT, CHANDLER & JOYCE 

1 30 BROAD STREET BOSTON, MASS. 

Tel. Hancock 6383-6384 

o24-4t 



It's smart to be thrifty 




• 
• 
• 
• 


IB^SI^^I as clean 

ySfc^fca ^Pi'W^IWi "can be! 






At rinMrn Bell, aolence, And the 
resour, .•» of an entire Industry 
are behind even n fl Job— our 
aterlle ■'•mtinunii* filtration pro- 
rem, rcmuira ALL dirt and Knot*, 
returning every garment l«0'/o 
cleaned, preMetl, KKKKKSIIED. 

Ask about our Mothproofing 
Service — guaranteed by the 
Lloyds Casualty Company. 


MEN'S SUITS »1 
Winter Coats »1 

(fur trimmed extra) 

Cloth Dresses *1 
FELT HATS75 C 






Eastern Ave. 
at Main St. 








GOLDEN BELL 


m 




MALden 2000 


Cleaners— Dyers 


□ 






• 




It's thrifty to call Qolden Bell 




ONE NAME 

Deico 

ONE QUALITY 



NO BATTERY — regardless of price, or make, will serve 
you better. 

NO BATTERY — costing less will serve you as well. 

FOR SERVICE, RECHARGING AND STORAGE 
ON ALL MAKES GALL 

Oscar Hedtler 

26 Church Street, Winchester Tel. 1208 



^Stranger than9iction! 



Come in and ask for PROOF of every statement in this advertisement 

The General Sherman. j*" — -n^ A five 
a Sequoia tree ixu / »m "a^rold 
I California is only 10ft. ( I ^pyiib 

Ha.tir.on, \ ,.}JL Sfc 
Buildixi*. \ J^Jm totally 

from. 
fright 



iitNewYork/ 




ower paddle 
> / wheels are still 
used, in Japan -a 
* the most W*-\ 
civilijed 
ccurttry —a 
in. the" r 4« 




YOUR BATHROOM, no less than your living room, should 
reflect good taste, modernity and comfort. 

P T. FOLEY 6c CO. 

PLUMBING- AND hEATl NG- CONTRACTORS 

^/// #o66/rtg> promp/ti/ aflt/tcfaeffo 

599 MAIN STREET WINCHESTER. MASS' 

SHOP— Tel. Win. 1492 RES. — Tel. Win. 1726 



i WINCHESTER HOSPITAL 

The Winchester Hospital during 
! the six month? from April 1 to Octo- 
! ber 1 has been a very busy place 
! many times, 
i 907 patients cared for. 

117 babies born 

199 major operations performed 

372 minor operations 

828o days of hospital care given. 
During these six months, this means 
an average of 45 patients a day. 

■1017 days of this hospital care 
were given to patients in the wards. 
The charge for a day for a ward 
patient really pays only one half the 
cost of caring for that patient and 
is about $3 a day. 

It costs the hospital $b" a day to 
care for a ward patient. 

The difference between the cost 
and the charge for 4017 ward days 
represents the charity work done by 
the Winchester Hospital in the past 
six months. 

The expense of this work, nearly 
$14,000, must be met by the private 
contributions from the sustaining 
members and income from the en- 
dowment fund. 



THE CLOSING CHAPTER 



To the Editor of the Star: 

I received on Friday the 31st— 
just too late for inclusion in iast 
week's Star, a cable from the Mayor 
and Mayoress of Winchester. Eng- 
land. 

I am quite sure that your readers 
will all be glad to see it and learn how 
pleased the Mayor and .Mayoress were 
at their reception in this country. I 
will, therefore, ask you to be kind 
enough to print the "following cable 
in this week's Star: 



TEAMS TIED AT COUNTRY 
CLUB 



B. A. Goodale and F. O. Adams 
had a 70 to tie with V.. A. Tutein and 

A. M. Bond in the Class A division 
of the fo.i--ball handicap match at 
the Winchester Country Club last 
Saturday afternoon. E. A. Sexton 
and I. E. Jennings had an 82 to win 
the Class B competition. 

The summary: 

< lais A 

B. A. Goodale ami F. O. Adams Tfi 

K. A. TuUin and A. M. Bond "6 

S. Walker and E. M Fisher 77 

It. II. Boutwell anil I. S. Hall 711 

T. I. Freeburn and N. B. Hartford 81 

Clau II 

0, A. Sexton and I E. Jennings S2 



Winchester, England 

Oct. 30, 1930 
Honorable Lewis Parkhurst: 

Selectmen's Office. Winchester, 
Massachusetts. Safely home again. 
Heartiest greetings to you and 
townspeople of W inchester. Warm- 
est thank:- to you all for wonder- 
ful reception and most generous 
hospitality and delightful time you 
gave us. Both feeling worlds bet- 
ter for the trip. 

Mayor and Mayoress of 
Winchester, England 



Winchester is very fortunate in 
having a local paper that opens its 
columns so readily to all that is of 
interest to the town, and I personal- 
ly, as a citizen, want to thank you 
for all you have done to make our 
Tercentenary week so pleasant and 
so successful. I wish to especially 
commend your cartoonist on the re- 
j suit of his skill as depicted in your 
issue of Oct. 4. It seemed to me that 
everyone of the sketches was most 
excellent. 

Sincerely yours. 

Lewis Parkhurst 



TOWN TEAM BEATS ST. 

OF CAM BRUM; E 



JOHN'S 



13—0 Win Keeps Record Intact 



By virtue of its 13—0 win over St. 
John's C, C. eleven of Cambridge last 
Sunday afternoon at Rindge Field in 
the University City, the Winchester 
Town Team remained in the unde- 
feated and unscoied upon ranks of 
independent football clubs in Greater 
Boston. 

La.-t Sunday's contest was a clean- 
ly played, interesting football game 
which was witnessed by a good sized 
crowd, including many who followed 
the Town Team from Winchester. 

St. John's put a good eleven on the j 
field and gave the locals a good game. ! 
Winchester, however, scored early and I 
was never in any real danger of de- | 
feat during the entire matinee. The 
Cantabridgians started several sec- j 
ond stringers against Winchester and ( 
the locals showed their appreciation j 
by rushing to a quick score. 

With the ball in his possession at 
midfield, quarterback Gnazio Amico 
shot off a beauty pass to "Maynie" j 
MacDonnell who ran 20 yards to the ' 
15-yard stripe before he was downed, j 
Haley was stopped at tackle but on j 
a spinner play Amico got away 
for t he touchdown, 
for the extra point. I 
quarter with St. 1 
ball at its 40-yard 
'even was forced , 
Fleming was in 




FORTNICHTLY NOTES 



In 



No 



the 



Patrolman James I'. Donaghey was 
called Sunday to shoot a cat which 
had been badly injured by a police 
dog on Chesterford road. 



Office of the 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Winchester, Mass. 

You are hereby required on or 
before Dec. 1, 1930 to destroy 
the gypsy and brown-tail moths 
on your property in this town. 

This notification is in accord- 
ance with Chapter 132, Section 
18, General Laws, which re- 
quires cities and towns to de- 
stroy the eggs, caterpillars, pu- 
pae and nests of the gypsy and 
brown-tail moths, under heavy 
penalty for failure to comply 
with the provisions of the law. 

If a property owner fails to 
destroy such eggs, caterpillars, 
pupae and nests, then the city or 
town is required to destroy the 
same, and the cost of the work, 
in whole or in part, according 
to the value of the land, is as- 
sessed upon and becomes a lien 
on the land. (See Section 18. 
Chapter 132, General Laws, on 
reverse). 

The Selectmen ask owners and 
tenants to co-operate with the 
town in its work on highways 
and other public grounds by do- 
ing effective work on their prem- 
ises. Citizens, who have cleaned 
their premises of the moths but 
find their trees endangered by 
the neglect of owners of ad- 
joining estates, should make 
complaint to the Selectmen. The 
infestation of a residential 
neighborhood by the neglect of 
a few will not he tolerated. 

The eggs of the gypsy moths 
should be destroyed at once with 
creosote. They should never be 
scraped off the object on which 
they are laid. Careful search 
should be made for gypsy moth 
egg clusters, not only on trees, 
but also on house walls, stone 
walls, fences and in rubbish 
heaps, etc. (Trees in which cav- 
ities occur and which it is not 
desirable to cut should have the 
cavities tinned or cemented. This 
is important.) The present and 
future cost of combating this 
insect can be greatly reduced by 
cutting and burning worthless 
brush, hollow trees, etc. A few 
trees well cared for are more 
valuable to the property owner 
and the community than a large 
number of neglected trees. 

The nests of the brown-tail 
moths should be cut off the trees, 
carefully collected and burned in 
stove or furnace. 

OCTOBER, 1930 o31-3t 



around right end 
Haley rushed over 

In the second 
John's holding the 
line, the Cambridge 
to kick and "Goose 
to block the punt. The hall bounded 
along to the 30-yard line where it 
was gathered in by McDonnell, Win- 
chester end, who stopped the remaind- 



SOUTHERN MIDDLESEX HEALTH 
ASSOCIATION HOLDS 
MEETING 



The annual meeting of the South- 
ern Middlesex Health Association. Inc. 
was Held at the North Reading State 
Sanatorium Wednesday, Nov. B. 

There were 100 guests represent- 
ing every citv and town in the dis- 
trict. 

Dr. Alton S. Pope, director of tu- 
berculosis, State Department of Pub- 
lic Health, spoke on "The next steps 
in tuberculosis control." 

The meeting included the reading 
of the annual reports of the Secre- 
tary, and Treasurer, and the election 
of officers for the coming year. The 
following officers were elected: 
President Dr Carl ('. MaeCorison 
2nd Vice-President Mr. William .1. Roll 
Treasurer Mr. E. Karl Rlakeiy 
Secretary Mrs. Claude K. Patch 
Executive Secretary Miss Mary (\ HoisinE- 
ton, R.N, „ , 

Executive Committee Mr. Arthur W. Cool, 
idite, Mrs. Klisha Fowler, Mrs. Clarence C. 
Hunt, Hv Charles W. McPherann, Or. Ther- 
. II. Thomas, Mr. Clarence C. White. Mr. 
James Quinn. Rev. (.'. 1'. Wellman, Mr. Al- 
mon K. Richardson 

Following the meeting there was 
an exhibit of the handicraft work 
done by the children at our summer 
health camp in Sharon. 



er of the distance to the 
goal line for a second 
Winchester tried to rush 
tra point, but failed. 

Just before the ending 
St. John's took to the air 
flock of successful 
took the ball down 



We never have enough of the Philip 
Brooks calendars. Now on sale at the 
STAR office. 




\ iC I Cl IT/ 

or 

(( M\( I CI 

POMPONS 

The pompon ii the "baby" of 
the chrysanthemum family, 
with all the color and faicin*. 
tion of these glorious Fall 
flowers. See our display today I 

WINCHESTER CONSERVATORIES 

INCORPORATED 

— Two Stores — 
Main Store and Greenhouses 

186 Cambridge Street 
Phones: Win. 1702, Win. 0609 

ARNOLD SHOP 

1 Common Street Phone W in. 0205 




T. F. Kennefick 

Roofing and Metal Work 
of All Kinds 

Office at A. Miles Holbrook's 
24 CHURCH STREET TEL. WIN. 1250 



fU-tf 



CALE RADIATOR FURNITURE ^ 



BEAUTIFC L ECONOMY 

No one ever admired the appearance 
of unxiphtly radiators. Everyone ad- 
mires the beauty of CALE Radiator 
Enclosures. Made of tine furniture 
steel to prevent warping and crack- 
ing from the heat, and skilfully fin- 
ished to resemble the finest of woods 
CALE Radiator Enclosures throw 
the heat out into the room - away 
from the wall. This keeps walls and 
draperies clean, thereby eliminating 
redecorating cost*. Estimates cheer- 
fully furnished. 

CALE METAL PRODUCTS CO. 
250 Stuart St. Boston. Man. 

Hancock 06)1 



( Cambridge 
touchdown. 

for thi' ex- 

of the half 
and with a 
passes quickly 
the field. The 



march and 
club never 



whistle cut short the 
thereafter the home 
threatened. 

In the third period after an ex- 
change of punts a couple of pretty 
passes from Amico, first to "Jimma" 
Flaherty and then to "Sam" Horn, 
coupled with some effective line 
bucking by Chefalo ami Haley, took 
the ball to the St. .John's one-yard 
line. Here a bad pass from center 
hit Amico in the face and the fumble 
was recovered by Cambridge, St. 
John's kicked out 'of danger and dur- 
ing the entire last quarter of the 
game play remained in midfield with 
neither club enjoying any particular 
advantage, 

The summary: 
WINCHESTER T T. 

MacDonnell. le 

Cumminm, le 

Krongelo, It 

Kerrigan, It 

TofuH, Ttr 

Carroll, Ig 

Fleming, e 

DelCirasso, c 

Cofbi* ra 

Kerrigan, rg 

Quigley, it 



ST. JOHN'S (' ('. 

re, Curtin 

re, Desrosier* 

rt. Lehane 

. rt, P. McMnhon 

rg. Davis 

rg, Drolette 
"olan 



Ni 



McNeil, r.' 

R. Horn, re 

Amico, <ib 

I 'l. ming, 'd' 

S. Horn, Mil 

Flaherty, lid. 

McCarthy, lid. 

Haley, I'hb 

Prue, rhl. 

Chefalo, fl> 

S. Horn, fli 

Scc.tv Winchest 
Touchdowns Amii 
t.T touchdown, by 



k'. Anderson 
. . . ,1>-'. Housa 
.It. Connercy 
It. Noone 

If, Steele 

. .1... liostirk 
. Maloney 



.rhb, 
. rhb. 



Doolin 
Cerrier 



(lion 



lhb. .1. McMi 

lhb, Nadeau 

fb. O'Hare 

fb. McQuillon 

r 13, St. John's I". I'. ». 
». MacDonnell. Point af- 
rushlnx Haley. Referee 
.Sullivan. Linesman Doherty, Time two 
ten and two twelve minute periods. 



REV. J. 



GRESHAM WACHEN, D.I). 
COMING 



At special services 
well known leader in 
ism, Rev. .1. Greshatn 
formerly Professor at 
now of Westminster 



on Sunday, a 
Presbyterian- 
Machen, D.I)., 
Princeton and 
will be the 



preacher morning and evening at the 
First Baptist Church. 

Dr. Machen is known in church 
circles both here and abroad as a 
scholar of the first rank as well as a 
gifted writer and preacher. Some 
of his recent books include. "The Ori- 
gin of Paul's Religion. 1921;" "Chris- 
tianity and Liberalism. 1923:" "New 
Testament Greek 1923;" "What Is 
Faith. 192-);" "The Virgin Birth of 
Christ, 1930." 

A genial personality together with 
vigorous convictions combine in Dr. 
Machen to make an attractive and 
compelling sneaker. His trenchant 
style and rich scholarship accord him 
the deepest respect of even those 
who mav not entirely agree with 
him. Whatever he is, Professor 
Machen is not colorless, for he is 
very pronounced in his views on the 
trends of present day religion. Those 
who want an understanding of what 
religious leaders are thinkinir should 
not miss the opportunity to hear this 
notable scholar. 



Town Hall, next Monday, 
at 2:30 p. m, at the regular 
meeting of the Fortnightly, there will 
be a delightful opportunity tor each 
and everyone of the members of the 
club to become, not fashion "con- 
scious," for everyone is surely that, 
but fashion "wise." A review of the 
mode, sponsored by Chandler & Co., 
arranged by their own stylist. Miss 
Dorothy Dorr, ami "modeled" by la- 
dies of the Fortnightly, will show 
costumes for every occasion which 
may arise in the year 1930-31, Mrs. 
Grace B. Aseltine, Mrs. Helen T. 
Bowe, Mrs. Sarah W. deRochemont, 
Mis. Mabel II. Gage, Mis. Carolyn 
I). Gilpatric, Mrs. Martha W. Kelley, 
Mrs. Winifrede S. Meyer, Mrs. Ed- 
nah F. Miller. Mrs. Anne 1. Sargent, 
and Mrs. Gretchen II. West will act 
as models. 

There will be a card party at Fort- 
nightly Ha!! on Tuesday. Nov. IS at 
2 p. in. Mis. Mary F. Cass, chairman, 
Winchester 0584-R, 

The Parliamentary Law Class, held 
on Wednesday mornings is increasing 
in membership anil in interest. Those 
who have not been able to take the 
entire course may enroll for the re- 
maining sessions, or it' preferred, 
siimle lessons may be taken. Wed- 
nesday mornings at 10 o'clock, until 
Dec. s ; Mis, George Hutchins, in- 
st ructor. 

Everyone who attended .ho first 
Literature meeting of the year on 
Monday. Nov. ■'>, felt that she formed 
a new friendship, or strengthened an 
old one. The life, the spirit and 
character of Emily Dickinson, as well 
as lur poetry, were most clearly anil 
charmingly presented by Mi-. Flor- 
ence I. Cross, ami her assistants. Mrs. 
Beatrice T. Hatch and Mrs. Winifred 
B. Nicholas. Mrs. Hatch gave fas- 
cinating pictures of the lit'o ami mind 
of the poet of Amherst as portrayed 
in the recent book written by Miss 
Genevieve Taggert. These glimpses 
revealed the influence of father, fam- 
ily, friends and surroundings upon 
the rare and sensitive nature of Emily 
as a child and young woman, With 
this background the audience appre- 
ciated more keenly the beauty ami 
-pint, of the terse and illusive 
read by Mrs. ('res-, ami the 
striking selections given with 
table sympathy and understand 
Mrs. Nicholas.' 

At the close of the meeting, 
Amy Bridgeman, our own poet, 
was' born in Amherst, brought an es- 
pecially intimate touch by relating 
stories" connected with Emily Dickin- 
son and her cousin, our fellow towns- 
men, Mr. and Mis. Hunt. Through 
Mrs. Hunt's kindness a photograph 
and a quaint white dross were shown 
which had belonged to her whose 
19iith birthday anniversary is being 
irated throughout the land this 
Mrs. Anna M. Swanson, t'hair- 
of Literature, led the informal 
n and impressed her audience 
with the sense of thankfulness and 
of inspiration which has come to us 
all from intimate study of one of our 
great American poets. 

It was urged that all who possibly 
can shall read "Coronet" by Manuel 
Kamroff before the meeting on Dec. 1. 

In spite of the many interesting 
events here in Winchester yesterday. 
1 S art lovers made the trip to the 
Harvard Museums. Tin y were thor- 
oughly repaid in the novel and beau- 
tiful objects they saw and the infor- 
mation they gleaned. The Agassiz 
Museum, the Foo-jr Collection, anil the 
Germanic Museum were visited. 



lyrics 
more 
inimi- 
ing by 

. Mis.S 

who 



co 

year, 
man 
discussif 




BIRN HAM— CURRIER 



Miss Arline Jewell Currier of 7 Dix 
terrace, a teacher in the Wyman 
School, and Robert W. Burnham of 
Gloucester were married at 9 o'clock 
last Friday morning at Jamaica Plain 
by Dr. Charles H. Williams, formerly 
of Trinity Congregational Church, 
Gloucester. 

Miss Currier was attended by Miss 
Esther A. Curtis of Medford and 
Ralph S. Burnham of Quincy was his 
brother's best man. Mr. Burnham 
and his bride left after the ceremony 
for a wedding journey through the 
Adirondacks and Canada. Upon their 
return they are to make their home 
in Medford. 

The bride, who is the daughter of 
Mr. R. Leslie Currier, is a graduate 
of Bridtrewator Normal School and 
was appointed a teachor in the Win- 
chester schools in 192S. Mr. Burn- 
ham. the son of Dr. Alien S. Burn- 
ham. attended Lowell Textile School 
and Boston University before becom- 
ing associated as teller with the New 
England Trust Company. 



W. C. I>. d. NOTES 

J W. C. D, S. «j — Fessenden Juniors 0 

Thursday afternoon, Oct. 39 the 
' \\. ('. I). S. football team took^ a 
closely fought contest from the Fes- 
I senden Juniors at Newton. 

The only score of the game came 
I in the first quarter when Captain 
Rogers tossed a 15-yard pass, to 
"Charlie" Reed who stepped across 
the goal line without hindrance. ^ In 
the second and third periods, the Fes- 
senden team threatened to score, but 
twice lost the ball on downs or had 
to punt. During the fourth period, 
neither team was able to push the 
ball beyond the opponents' 40-yard 
line. The line-up follows: 
( apt. Rogers, rhb 



Bernnard, fb 

Herd, lhb 
Sherburne, ob 
Aldrich, c 
Haartz, lit 
hallou. It 

Goodapeed, rt 
Bradlee, Ik 
Cape. Pe 
("uslimnn. le 
Touchdown K«'d. 
uti: perioda. 



N. 
C. 
K. 
T. 
J. 
It. 
II. 

c. 
j. 
it. 



Time four eiuht min- 



Alvah J. Luxford of 12 Vernon 
street, Woburn, reported to the police 
that while his Chrysler coach was 
parked on Stone avenue last Satur- 
day afternoon the brakes released 
and the m-ichine rolled down hill 
breaking off the hydrant in front of 
the residence of Mr. William D. Mac- 
Donald. 



Fessenden Midgets 35— Winchester 
Midgets 0 

Tuesday afternoon a fast Fessen- 
den Midget team decisively beat the 
untried Winchester Midgets at the 
local school's field. The visitors 
scored a touchdown in each of the 
first two periods, two in the third and 
one in the fourth. 

The lineup: 
FESSENDEN M ID. 

Sears, c 

Brifrffa, It 

Cndicott, rt 

Kllner, Ik 

Hanford, rK 

liurceM, le le. C. V,unu 

llntrhtwell. re re. J. Tobin 

Cordon, qb «|b. G. Bradlee 

Carver, lhb lhb. H Morriiwm 

( urti*. rhb rhb, E. Sherburne 

(apt. Quinn fb fb. J. Cape 



W. C. 



D. MID. 

c, E. Stone 

. It. E. Ha>ne» 
. rt. E. Peppard 
. Ik. ('•■ Billman 
. rK. J. Worcester 
C. 



All the boys are flying model aero- 
j planes. Can be had in Winchester for 
?1 at the STAR office. 



8 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1930 



.MELROSE HIGH WON FROM 
WINCHESTER 



Near Riot in Second Half Nearly 
Halted Game 



Melrose High School's contender 
for the Mystic Valley championship 
moved a long step nearer the title last 
Saturday afternoon when its eleven 
defeated Winchester High, 20 — 0 on 
Manchester Field. All the scoring 
was done during the first half of the 
contest when the visitors completely 
outclassed the local team. 

Winchester showed a complete re- 
versal of the form displayed against 
Wakefield and Belmont, failing to 
carry out its assignments and block- 
ing and tackling wretchedly. Mel- 
rose brought a fine team to Winches- 
ter and looked like a sure enough 
world beater during the first half. 
Later on when the locals became 
aroused and played the football they 
are capable of the visitors did not by 
any means look so potent. Melrose 
has a great all around football play- 
er in its quarterback, "Rex" Kidd and 
also showed a sweet running back in 
Robinson and a fine lineman in Capt. 
"Ait" Hannigan. Winchester's two 
Smiths, Wilmer and "Dan" were the 
only players who played consistent 
ball for the Red and Black. 

The game was a pretty rugged af- 
fair, and shortly after the resump- 
tion of play, following the intermis- 
sion, trouble developed that for a time 
threatened t<> be serious. "Dan" 
Smith, Winchester's great tackle u had 
been taking plenty all afternoon and 
before the thud quarter was far along 
he and three Melrose buys became 
mixed up iii a battle which for a few 
minutis looked like a free-for-all, 

.In t how the fracas started we 
cant -a:.. We did however, see Smith 
and two Melrose boys mixing it "tit 
in th'- open, ami one id' the Melrose 
belligerents was certainly Kidd. The 
other looked like Fuller, lnvr halfback 
of the visitors. Smith was wrestled 
ami knocked down by the two Melrose 
players, and once on his feet again, 
was sieved from behind by a third. 
By thai time quite a little delegation 
of excited fans had poured from the 
sidelines onto the field and had sur- 
rounded the player.-. The police 
charged in. and ordei was restored, 
Smith's version of the rumpus was 
that he was struck on two successive 
plays by a Melrose player, and that 
when he retaliated he was pitched up- 
on by Kidd and another Melrose boy, 
and punched several times, Kidd 
claimed in have been attempting to 
stop the fight. If so, he took a strange 
way tu du it. The other participant's 
part in the melee was obvious. Smith 
naturally fmight back and Winchester 
followers felt that under the circum- 
stances h» uldn't be blamed for de- 
fending himself. 

When the smoke of battle cleared 
away, the officials sent Smith and 
Harold McKenzie out of the game. 
Coach Mansfield protested that Kidd 
and the boy who was working with 
him on Smith be sent along too. The 
officials, however, refused to remove 
the Melrose ace. saying that they had 
not seen him in any infraction of the 
rules. It was strange that the three 
men hired to see what was goinff on 
on the field of play, shouldn't have 
seen what everyone on the Winches- 
ter side saw plainly enough, and for 
a time Coach Mansfield considered 
withdrawing his club from the game. 
Finally he decided to do what was the 
best thing all around, and permitted 
the game to continue. The Winches- 
ter fans were in an ugly mood and 
made no bones of expressing the 
opinion that the ruling had been 
manifestly unfair. 

The game went along, and was a 
slam-bang partv from then until the 
final whistle. Winchester offered the 
stubbornest sort of opposition to the 
Melrose offense and the visitors were 
unable to cross the goal line during 
the remaining two quarters. 

The going was very rugged and 
toward the end of the game. Wilmer 
Smith. Winchester's right halfback, 
sustained a broken nose that didn't 
aid in making the local supporters 
any more pleased. Melrose drew 
penalties aggregating 118 yards to 
•25 for Winchester. Smith, who was 
the target for the visiting attack, did 
not have a penalty inflicted upon him 
previous to the riot. 

After the pame a small crowd of 
fans surrounded the Melrose players, 
but the police at the game, aided by 
reserves from Headquarters prevented 
any real trouble. Patrolmen Henry 
Dempsey and Clarence Dunbury 
nipped a couple of mixups in the bud, 
and the Melrose boys got away with- 
out any casualties. 

As the teams lined up for the open- 
ing kickoff it was apparent that Mel- 
rose had a decided weight advantage 
behind the line and on the ends. The 
visitors kicked, and aided bv a couple 
of offside penalties. Winchester rushed 
to a couple of first downs, and then 
committed an error of judgment. 
With a yard to go on fourth down, 
Quarterback Tofuri tried to get the 
distance at center instead of kicking 
to the Melrose end of the fiel>'. The 
visitors held, took the ball on downs, 
and after rushing for two first downs, 
Kidd shot off a beauty pass which 
was grabbed by Hoekel who was 
downed on Winchester's 15-yard line. 
Kidd and McKenzie slid off the 
tackles for a first down on the 5-yard 
line, and then Harland Robinson, 
swift running back, skirted right end 
for the touchdown. Emery blocked 
the try for goal, but Winchester was 
offside and the point counted. 

Soon after the opening of the sec- 
ond quarter with the ball at Winches- 
ter's 43-yard line. Kidd dropped back 
to pass and fumbled. With two Win- 
chester men on top of him, the Mel- 
rose ace bounced the ball alone until 
he could pick it up on his own 47-yard 
line. There he calmly shot off a beau- 
tiful pass out to the left to Robinson 
who was all alone in exactly the right 
place to catch the leather and scam- 
per for a touchdown. It was a beau- 
tiful example of heads-up football. 
Winchester spoiled the attempt to run 
for the extra point, but the unexpect- 
ed result of the fumble plainly took 
a lot of fight out of the locals, and be- 
fore the end of the quarter Melrose 
had tallied again. 

Soon after Melrose had kicked off 
Winchester attempted a forward pass 
which hit three men and was finally 



grabbed by Kidd who galloped to the 
locals' 25-yard line. The Winchester 
boys were trying to stop Rexford by- 
grabbing him about the shoulders 
which was about like trying to halt a 
steam roller with a piece of string. 
Five yards Kidd made and then 10, be- 
fore Robinson got away at end to 
score. A pass for the extra point 
failed, but the officials ruled Win- 
chester had been using its hands il- 
legally and awarded the point to 
Melrose. 

Following the intermission Win- 
chester looked like an entirely differ- 
ent team and Melrose was unable to 
work the ball across the goal line dur- 
ing the last two periods of the battle. 
After the riot, Quarterback Hickey 
tore his game wide open and with 
Wilmer Smith doing some nice pass- 
ing the locals actually bothered 
Alelrose. 

The fans were still grumbling when 
Emery intercepted a Kidd forward at 
the Winchester .'iO-yard line, and on 
the second play thereafter Smith sent 
a long beauty "pas* down the sidelines 
which "Bob" Lee just failed to reach. 
It was Winchester's nearest scoring 
threat, though it looked a bit later as 
if Robinson might get clear for a long 
jaunt. 

As the quarter wore along Melrose 
was forced to kick, and its short effort 
was downed on the Winchester 44- 
yard line. A pass from Smith to Lee 
made a first down on the Melrose 44- 
yard line. Another pass failed and 
then a short pass behind the line was 
intercepted by Reeves who started all 
alone for the Winchester goal line. Lee 
took up the chase and hurled the Mel- 
rose boy to earth at the 15-yard line, 
i in the first play Melrose fumble. 1 and 
Haheity recovered for Winchester. 
Then Lee tossed a -hurt pass to Rob- 
inscn win. just missed getting clear 
for a long run. it' not a touchdown. 
Two 15-yard penalties against Melrose 
I' .r unnecessary roughness and holding 
took the ball to midfield where a Win- 
chester pass was intercepted. Melrose 
fumble. 1 ami Winchester recovered. 

Here a long pas- was intercepted by 
Kidd who ran to Winchester's 35-yard 

I n . before he was tackle 1 by Robin- 
sop. 

Melrose kept sending in new men 
In an effort to work the ball across. 

and mc< ded in getting to within the 

shadow of the local goal when a pen- 
alty fo" communicating set the visi- 
tor* back 15 yards as the game ended. 

Th" nummary: 

MK I tt osE WINCHESTER 

Hwkle, le '<'• DeMlnico 

Siiadafore. le „ , 

Hanniiom, It rt, Colpoi 

Tole. It 

Reeves, lur rg, Procoplo 

Alford, Ik 

Donovan, c '< Emery 

Nnrrts, c 
Mayo, c 

Randall, w Ift. Flaherty 

Crosby, n* 

W. MeKenzie, rt ... It. D Smith 

Mayo, rt It. Ambrose 

Brennan, re le. DIApella 

I.aValle. r.. le, Mobbi 

Ki.M, <|b 'I*'. Tnfnn 

Vauithn. qb 'lb. Hickey 

Robinson, Ihb rhb. W. Smith 

Sexton. Ihb rhb. Robinaon 

Fuller, rhb Ihb, Knowlton 

Delaney, rhb 

H. McKenzie, fb n>. !.** 

Gustafson, fh 
Carpenter, fb 

Score by Perlodi .1 I 3 4 Total 
M.-lros.. 7 18 n fi 20 

Totichdowita Robinson 3. Points by Koal 
after touchdown wiint awarded on Winches- 
ter offside. Point awarded on Winchester for 
illegal use of hands. Referee CarriKan. t'm- 
pire Haddleton. Linesman Reid. Time 
10 minut«. periods. 



WINCHESTER PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Books People Are Reading" 



Adam's Rest by Sarah G. Mullin 
Angel Pavement by J. B. Priestly 
Anne Marries Again by Louise I'. Hauck 
Hi* Barn by Walter D Edmonds 
Blowlnt Clear by Joseph C. Lincoln 
Blue Bucket Mystery by Francis D. Grierson 
Both Sides of the Street by Irvin S. Cobb 
The Bract-let by Robert Hichens 
Castle Gay by John Buchan 
Chances by A. Hamilton Gibus 
Charlie Chan Carries On by Earl Derr 
H letters 

Coldstone by Patricia Wentworth 
Comrades at Arms by Paul Feval 
Crime in the Dutch Garden by Herbert 
Adams 

Crystal Pagoda Bv Helen Berber 

Dance of Youth by Herman Sudermann 

Did She Full T by Thome Smith 

Daggers Drawn by Alan Thomas 

Doctor Serocold by Helen Ashton 

I ire Within by George Gibbs 

Ghosts High Noon by Carolyn Wells 

Golden K.iof by Margaret Fuller 

The Hammersmith Murders by David Frome 

llavanna Bound by Cecil Roberts 

Her Privates We by Private ly.0i2 

High Fences by Grace Richmond 

Jenny Fowler by Margaret W. Jackson 

Kings Minion by Rafael Sabatini 

Lighted Windows by Emilie Loring 

Love* Hater by Berla Ruck Onions 

Make-Believe by Faith Baldwin 

Margaret Yorke by Kathleen Norris 

.Middle Watch by J. H. Beith 
Mirthful Haven by Booth Tarkinston 

On Forsyte 'Change by John Galsworthy 

Outlaws of Eden by Peter H. Kyne 

Queen Anne's Lace by Franc.* P, Keyes 
Road From Echo by Lillian K. Craig 
Sunders of the River by Edgar Wallace 
Secret of the Creek by Victor Bridges 
.shepherds in Sackcloth by Shelia Kaye- 
Smith 

Shorn Lamb by William J. Locke 

Sky Farm by Clarice Blake 

Sophie by fiances R. Sterrett 

Spanish Lover by Prank W. Spearman 

This Awful Age bv Florence Ryerson 

Toni of Grand isle by Nelia G. White 

Trail to Paradise by Jackson Gregory 

Unforseen b> J. C. Snaith 

Wnters of Strife by Francis Lynde 



LADIES' FRIENDLY SOCIETY I calf Hall for the benefit of the Uni- Hale Reed will sing a number of 
: tarian parish house fund. Miss Park- songs during the afternoon. The Tea 

m%KySi7'l5?kep W wiU give a er '" propram wUI inciu,ie one " act Committw Berve u ' a at thv con ' 
program of dramatic readings in Met- | plays and monologues. Mrs. George ' elusion of the program. 



• Worth While Books" 

About Women by John Macv 
Ait of Whittling by Walter L. Faurot 
(Last* Called Wild by Andre Detnaison 
II ink of the Whit.- Mountain- by John An- 
il- r-oli 

lluving no 1 f . . T . - - 1 House by Milton Tucker 
Country Journalism by Charles L. Alien 
!> L Moods by Willia It Moody 
Disillusioned India hy Dhan G. Muk.rji 
Kdi on As I Know Him by Henry Ford 
Elements of Electricity by Anthony Zeleny 
Emerson by Ragis Michaud 
F«sny.< on Things by William I. von Phelps 
Haunting Edinburgh l>v Flora Grierson 
Hooked Rugs by William W Kent 
Hooked Rugs and How t,, Make Them by 

Anna L. Phillips 
John Quincy Adams by Henry B. Parkes 
New World of Physical Discovery by Flody 

I . Dnrrow 

Old Boston iEnglandl by M & R, Lambert 
Our Heritage by Nancy Paine Smith 
Real War IS14-1-IH by lla>il H. Liddell- 
Hart 

Roadside Meetings by Hamlin Garland 
Soviet Russia by William H. Chamberlain 
Story of Dwight W. Morrow by Mary M. 
McBride 

Taft and Roosevelt by Major Archie Butt 
Thought Control in Everyday Life by Janus 
Alexander 

Twilight of Christianity by Harry E. Barnes 
Wilderness nf Denall by Charles Sheldon 



Sea Food of all kinds. CotUlt oy- 
sters on half shell our specialty. Win- 
chester Sea Food Sho*», *>12 Main 
street, tel. Win. 22150. Free Delivery. 

o31-5t 




L i»V> 
% 'KifflS 




FREEBOOTERS WON FROM 
GIRLS' A. A. 

Strong Visiting Club Took 3 — 1 Ver- 
dict in Good (lame 

The Freebooters of the morning 
division of the Boston Field Hockey 
Association defeated the Winchester 
Girls' A. A. on Manchester Field last 
Saturday afternoon, 3 — 1. The visit- 
ors were a strong club, including in 
their lineup one all-American play- 
er, two junior all-American girls 
and an English player. 

Against such experienced opposi- 
tion the Winchester eleven made a 
good showing and with a bit more 
practice to perfect their team play 
the locals will be a hard club to beat. 

A big crowd saw last Saturday's 
game, many of those at the football 
battle spending a part of their time 
watching the hockey contest. Be- 
tween the halves of the high school 
game the sidelines were crowded 
with people. 

Tyson, visiting right inner, put 
the Freebooters out in front during 
the first half when she caged the 
ball from a spirited scrimmage in 
front of the Winchester goal. After 
play had been resumed, following 
half time, the same player scored 
again, also from scrimmage. The 
visitors made little effort to dribble 
the ball, being content to hit it hard 
and trusting to this method to ad- 
vance the ball. 

Facing a score of 2 to 0, Winches- 
ter's attack got going, and after 
rushing the ball to the Freebooters' 
end of the field, "Giny" Merrill 
scored from scrimmage. The visit- 
ors scored their final goal after a 
scrimmage in front of the local 
sticks. 

A hard hit shot at the goal was 
saved and cleared nicely by Win- 
chester's "Puggy" Mercer, but Rich- 
ardson, Freebooter left inner, was 
right on the job, and taking Mer- 
cer's clear, slammed the ball right 
past the local goa'.er. 

The summary: 

FREEBOOTERS WINCHESTER 

Wilbur, lw rw. MacKenzie 

Richardson, li ri, Skilling, i capt. ) 

ri, Cullen 

Soaulding, rf cf, Vallely 

Tvson. ri li. V. Merrill 

Moses rw lw. Carlisle 

Wheeler. Ihb rhb. Morrow 

Bartol. chb chb. M. Merrill 

chb, Newman 

Blank, rhb Ihb. Bond 

Dickson, lfb rfb. C»tt*r 

Bunker, rfb leapt) lfb. Dwlan 

Spinir. g g. Mercer 

Score- -Frwbooters 3, Winchester 1. Goals 
Tyson 2, Richardson. V. Merrill. Referee* 
Gosh and Evens. Scorers Newman and 
M. Merrill. Timer - Friend. Time 20 min- 
ute halves. 

A Packard sedan, driven by Fred 
D. Hardy of 47 Cambridge street, 
while backing from a parking place 
on Thompson street at 5:35 last Fri- 
day afternoon collided with a Nash 
touring car. owned by Harry W. 
Stevens of Mystic Valley Parkway 
and parked alongside. Both machines 
were slightly damaged. 



brinxj beauty into 

ifit HOME.. 
wlod? HEART 



Big bundles of sunshine" 
— that's what one little 
tot called our chrysan- 
themums. 

They are packed with 
brightness and cheer . . . 
ideal for home decora- 
tion, to carry a message 
of love, of sympathy, 
of congratulations. 

WINCHESTER CONSERVATORIES 

INCORPORATED 

— Two Stores — 

Main Store and Greenhouses 

186 Cambridge Street 
Phones: Win. 1702, Win. 0609 

ARNOLD SHOP 

1 Common Street Phone Win. 0205 




SILK SALE 

10,000 dress-length remnants of 
finest silk to be cleared by mail, re- 
gardless. Every desired yardage and 
color. All 39 inches wide. Let us 
send you a piece of genuine $6 Crepe 
Paris (very heavy flat crepe) on ap- 
proval for your inspection. If you 
then wish to keep it mail us your 
check at only $1.90 a yard. (Original 
price $6 a yd.). Or choose printed 
Crepe Paris. Every wanted combina- 
tion »f colors. We will gladly send 
you a piece to look at. What colors 
and yardage, please? If you keep 
it you can mail us check at $1.25 a 
yd. (Final reduction. Originally $6 
a yd.) 

All $2 silks. $2 satins and $2 
printed crepes are 90c a yd. in this 
sale. Every color. Do not ask for or 
buy from samples. See the whole 
piece you are getting before deciding. 
We want to be your New York refer- 
ence so tell us all you wish to about 
yourself and describe the piece you 
want^ to see on approval. Write 
NOW. Send no money. To advertise 
our silk thread we send you a spool 
to match free. 

CRANE'S, Silks. 545 Fifth Avenue 
New York City 



"They are the Best" 

MRS. TURNER'S 

DELICIOUS 

POTATO CHIPS 

FOR SALE GENERALLY THROUGHOUT 
\\ INCHESTER 



NEWTON PURE FOOD COMPANY 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 




Our Modern, Completely Equipped Funeral Home and Chapel 

KELLEY & HA WES CO* 

jFVUieral E>treCt0r8 Lady Assistants 
Service Available Anywhere in New England PHONES: WINCHESTER 0035. 0174, 0106 




Your Bills — and Ours 



LIKE everyone else working for a living, the Telephone 
Company wants to get paid for its services with reasonable 
promptness. Sixty cents of every dollar it takes in is paid out in 
wages. This means a cash outlay during each month. 

The Company's only source of revenue to meet this and 
other service costs is the bills rendered to telephone 
customers. Also, the margin of profit is so close that 
the loss of one-half a cent per telephone per day would put 
red figures in the profit and loss column. 

If the Post Office sold stamps at retail and rendered monthly 
biUs therefor, it would be doing business on a basis comparable in 
that respect with ours. Telephone calls are sold on: at a time, 
and except at pay stations, are sold on a charge account. An 
operator notes the charge, but another employee does the billing. 

Even with careful "check and double check" there are 
possibilities of occasional error. We want to correct them. 
We do not want any money we haven't earned. 

Out Service Representatives at 17 Thompson Street have charge of 
billing records; hence they can assist in verifying or correcting 
any questioned account. This local office is also a convenience for 
customers with no checking accounts or who prefer to pay cash. 

Service Representatives also take orders for putting in, 
taking out, or moving telephones, and for installing exten- 
sion telephones or other accessories; in short, are the 
Company's representatives for the handling of its business 
details with local customers. 

// your telephone number is between Winchester 0001 and 1099 
your Service Representative is Mrs. McLeod; if it is Winchester 
1 100 or higher, she is Miss Babcock. You can telephone them by 
asking your operator for "Business Office." 

Atherton Loring, Jr. 



New England Telephone and Telegraph Company 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7. 1930 



Mr. Timothy J. Queenin, who died 
in Lynn last week, was the brother 
of Mr. Michael J. Queenin of Myrtle 
street. 



BOWDOIN coMTr"" 



WttK of NOV 9 - SUN.-MON -TUES.-Wf D.-2TAIK* WT5 

GidriaSwanson Yfhat a Widow 

BUCK JONES in'SHADOW RANCH " 
4'R- K-O V AUDEVILLE ACTS at Evf «/ Show 

weiNMme next Thursday -entire new show 

f M t„r.n,-NUMBERfO MEN'wd'fyES OF THE WORLD 



1 NOTICE 13 HEREBY GIVEN that the 
subscribers have been duly appointed execu- 
tors of the will of Daniel WetwUr Pratt late 

j of Winchester in the County of Middlesex. 
Massachusetts, deceased, testate, and have tak- 
en upon themselves that tru*t by giving bond*, 
as the law directs. 

All persons having demands upon the eu- 

1 tat . of said deceased are hereby required to 

I exhibit the same: and all persons indebted t/i 
■aid .state are called upon to make payment 

! to 

CHARLES H PRATT 

ELMER D. FLETCHER 

Executors 

i Address I 
20 George Street, 

Sormrville. Mass. 
H Lagrange Str*"et, 

Winchester, Mass. 
November 5, 1980 n"-3t 



MALDEN 




THEATRES 



E 



GRANADA 5TRAND 



1 



TEL. MALDEN 0212 
Now Playing 

"THE SPOILERS" 

with GARY COOPEB 

also 

"CHILDREN OF 
PLEASURE" 

with LAWRENCE GRAY 
and BENNY RUBIN 

stin ts Saturday, Nov. h 

Saturday Continuous 1:46 to 11 
Sunday Continuous 3 to 11 

"MONTE CARLO" 

A Smart and Sophial irated Comedy 
Hit with 

J E A N ETT E Mac DONALD 
and JACK BUCHANAN 

co-feature 

"THE SILENT ENEMY" 




TEL. MALDEN 3711 

7 Days Startini! Saturday, Nov. 8 

RICHARD ARLEN in 

"THE SEA GOD" 

a I ho 

ANITA PAGE and 
DOUG. FAIRBANKS, Jr. in 

'THE LITTLE ACCIDENT" 



Saturday and Sunday Only 

RI N-T IN -TIN in 

"THE LONE DEFENDER" 



A. 



Coming Week of Nov. 1"> 
I 1 1' I DORS AY in 

"Those 3 French Girls" 



MYSTIC 



THEATRE 
rVlALDEISJ 



Starts Saturday, November 8th— Saturday Continuous 1:45 to 11 
Sunday Shows — Continuous 3 to 11 

PAUL WHITEMAN AND HIS BAND WITH JOHN BOLES 

in the All-Technicolor Spectacle 

KING OF JAZZ" 

The hest of them all 

— Second Attraction — 

RIN-TIN-TIN in "THE MAN HUNTER" 



WINCHESTER NATIONAL BANK 

In compliance with the requirements of 
Chapter 590, Section 40. Acta of 190!,. aa 
amended by Chapter 491. Section 6, Acts of 
1909. and by Chapter 171. Section 1. Acts of 
1912, notice is hereby given of the loss of 
pass-book No. 52S1. 

EDWIN M. NELSON. Cashier 

o^4-3t 

MORTGAGEE'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE 



I!y virtue of the power of sale contained 
in a certain mortgage deed given by George 
C. Wright to the Winchester Co-operative 
Hank, dated October 10, 19J9 and recorded 
with Middlesex South District Deeds. Hook 
.7406. Page 130, for breach of the conditions 
of said mortgage and for the purpose of fore- 
closing the same will be sold at publa: auc- 
tion on the premises hereinafter described on 
Monday. November 17, 1930 at nine o'clock in 
the forenoon, all and singular the premises 
conveyed by said mortgage deed and therein 
substantially described as follows: 

"A certain parcel of land situate*! in Win- 
chester, Middlesex County, with the buildings 
theri-on. shown as Lot numbered 6 on a Plan 
of Subdivision of Lots, Winchester. Mars.. 
J uii,' lu. 19241. Parker Holbrook, Engineer," 
said plan recorded with Middlesex South Dis- 
trict Deeds. being bounded and described as 
follows: Northwesterly by land now or form- 
erly of K-tella C. Cooper as shown on said 
plan ninety-eight and 92 100 (9H.U2I feet: 
Northeasterly by land now or formerly of 
Pauline P. Donaghue as shown on said plan, 
seventy-six ar.rt 91 100 (7G.9H feet: South- 
easterly by Lot C as ahown on said plan, 
eighty-seven and 94,100 (87.94) feet: and 
Southwesterly by a Private Street and by- 
Myrtle Terrace as shown on said plan, sixty- 
five and 3 100 i65.03l feet. Containing six 
thousand five hundred sixty-two l«.562l square 
feet of land as shown on said plan. Together 
with the fee in that portion of said Private 
Street to the middle line thereof as abuts on 
the aforesaid premises on the Southwest. Said 
premises are also conveyed subject to and 
with the benefits of a right of way in the 
whole of said Private Street for all purposes 
for which public ways may be used in said 
Winchester. The above described premises 
are also conveyed together with and subject 
to the rights, restrictions, reservations and 
easement.-, set forth and referred to in a deed 
from William P. Greeley to the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts recorded with Mid- 
dlesex South District Deeds, Book 279-1, Page 
111 in si, fur as the same are now in force 
and applicable to the above described prem- 
ises. Hereby conveying the same premises 
conveyed to George C. Wright hy Addle E. 
Phippen anil Emma G. Rice, Trustees by deed 
dated Sept. 14, 1929 and recorded with said 
Deeds." 

Said premise* will be sold subject to all 
unpaid tuxes, tax titles, assessments or other 
municipal liens. $200.oo in cash will be re- 
quired to be paid at the time of the sale and 
the balance to la- paid within ten (101 days 
from the date of sale at Room Mo, 10 State 
Strut. Boston, Mass. Other particulars made 
known at time of sale. 

WINCHESTER CO-OPERATIVE BANK, 
Mortgagee and present holder 
By Ernest R, Eustis, Treasurer 

For further information apply to Curtis W. 
Nash, 10 State Street, Boston Mass. o24-8t 



MORTGAGEE'S SALE 

By virtue and in execution of the Power of 
Sale contained in a certain mortgage given 

by Dorothy A. brine to the Wildey Savings 
Hank, dated June 5. 1905 and recorded with 
Middlesex South District Deeds in Book 3173. 
Page (66, of which mortgage the undersigned 
is the present holder, for bresch of the con- 
ditions of said mortgage and for the purpose 
of foreclosing the same will be sold at pub- 
lic auction on the premises on Monday, the 
twenty-fourth day of November. 1930 at Hen- 
thirty o'clock in the forenoon, all and singu- 
lar the premises which are describvd. in said 
mortgage substantially as follows : 

"A certain pare. ! of land with all the build- 
ings thereon •••••• lituated in said Win- 
chester on the Southwesterly corner of Wash- 
ington and Webster Street-, bounded and de- 
scribed as fohows, to wit :- Northwesterly 
by said Washington Street about one hun- 
dred and twenty three feet ; Northeasterly by 
>aid Webster Street about one hundred and 
sixty five fret : Southeasterly by land of 
Caroline A. Payne by a line passing through 
the centre of a hedge and the centre of two 
red c.slar stakes therein about one hundred 
and twenty three feet : and Southwesterly by 
land of Amelia C, Greenlaw by a line pass- 
ing through the centre of a hedge and the 
centre of a red cedar stake at the corner of 
the hedge about one hundred and seventy 
feet. Said premises are conveyed together 
with and subject to all rights contained in 
deed of Joseph Shattuck to Dorothy A. Urine 
dated April SO, lt>92 and recorded with Mid- 
dlesex South District Deeds. Hook 2116. page 
28, or however otherwise said premises may- 
be bounded or described," 

Th- premises will be sold subject to all 
unpaid taxes, tax titles, sewer assessments 
and municipal liens if any there are. 

A deposit of five hundred dollars i$f>00.l in 
cash will be required to be paid by the pur- 
chaser at the tim" and place of sale, the 
balance to be paid in ten (10 J days from 
date of sale. 

WILDEY SAVINGS BANK, 

Mortgagee 

By Frank B. Cutter, 

President 

William J. Kurth. Atty., 
73 Tremont Street, 

Boston. Mass. o31-3t 

MORTGAGEE'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE 



ST ON EHAM 



Mat. 2:15 



Eve. 7:45 



Sat. 6:15. 8:30 



Sun. 3 P. M. 



Come to Stoneham and see our new white way — 
Our new Main Street, unlimited parkins after 
7 P. M. — Our new up-to-date, modern theater. 



Friday, Nov. 7 

George Bancroft & Mary Astor in "LADIES LOVE BRUTES" 
Lewis Stone in "STRICTLY UNCONVENTIONAL" 

Don't forget the Linenware on Friday 

Saturday, Nov. 8 

George O'Brien and Helen Chandler in "ROUGH ROMANCE" 
George Duryea and Sally Starr in "PARDON MY GUN" 

FABLES 

Sunday and Monday, Nov. 9, 10 

Richard Barthelmess and Constance Bennett in 
"SON OF THE GODS" 

COMEDY VITAPHONE ACT SOUND NEWS 

Don't forget Beautyware on Monday 

Tuesday and Wednesday, Nov. 11, 12 

Marion Davies in "THE FLORADORA GIRL" 
Gary Cooper and Fay Wray in "THE TEXAN" 

KNTTE ROCKNE FOOTBALL SERIES NEWS 
Tuesday, Nov. 11. 2 Shows— 2:15 and 7:45 

Thursday and Friday, Nov. 13, 14 

Frederick Marsh in "MANSLAUGHTER" 
Don Jose Mogna and Mona Maris in "ONE MORE KISS" 

AUDIO REVIEW 



"jH" A Ctimbrklfte Institution 

University! 
Theatre* 

Harvard Square, Cambridfe. Mass. 

Now Show ing 

Nanrv Carroll in 
"FOLLOW TURF" 

Constance Bennett jn 
"THREE FACES EAST" 

Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed. 
Nov. :>, lo. li. 12 

GLORIA SWANSON in 

"What a Widow" 

Conrad Nagel in 
"NUMBERED MEN" 



Thurs. Fri, Sat. 
Nov. 13, 14. 1,1 
JOHN McCORMAC K in 

"Song of My Heart" 

"ON YOUR BACK" 
Irene Rich, H. It. Warner 

Continuous i 11 



By virtue of the power of sale contained in 
a certain mortgage deed given Harry T. 
Elliott to the Winchester Co-operative Hank, 
dated October 8, 1929. being Document No. 
101.282 noted on Certificate of Title No. 
29.8.M filed in the South Registry District for 
Middlesex County, Registration Hook 200, 
Page 2".). for breach of the conditions of said 
mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing 
the same will be sold at public auction on the 
premises hereinafter described on Monday, 
November 24. 1930 at nine o'clock in the fore- 
noon, all and singular the premises conveyed 
by said mortgage dees), and therein substan- 
tially described as follows: 

"A certain parcel of land with the build- 
ings thereon situated in Winchester, Middle- 
sex County, on Grayson Road, and being 
shown as Lot 33 on a plan hereinafter re- 
ferred to. said lot being more fully bounded 
ami described as follows: Southwesterly by 
Grayson Road sixty-six and 32 loll (£6.32) 
feet : Southeasterly by Lot 12, one hundred 
six and 9.7 1011 (106.05) feet; Northeasterly 
by land now or formerly of George R. Nugent, 
sixty-six and .70 100 (66.6(1) fist; Northwest- 
erly by Lot 34. one hundred two and 07 100 
1I02.071 feet All of said boundaries are de- 
termined to be located as shown on a plan 
drawn by Parker Holbrook, Engineer, dated 
July 21. 1929, and tiled in the Middlesex 
South District Deeds, as plan numbered 3.73.7- 
l. and filed with Certificate of Title No. 
29,308. The above premises are subject to 
restrictions of record so far as the same mny 
now be in force and applicable. Hereby con- 
veying the same premises conveyed to Har- 
ry T. Elliott by the Winchester Realty Com- 
pany, by deed dated Oct. 7, 1929, and duly 
recorded with said Deeds." 

Said premises will be sold subject to all 
unpaid taxes, tax titles, assessments or other 
municipal liens. $200.00 in cash will lie re- 
quired to be paid at the time of the sale and 
the balance to lie paid within ten (10) days 
fri in tin- date of sale at Ro.m 810, 10 State 
Stns't, Boston, Mass. Other particulars made 
known at time of sale. 

WINCHESTER CO-OPERATIVE HANK. 

Mortgagee 

Hy Ernest R. Eustis, Treasurer 
For further information apply to Curtis W. 
Nash. 10 State Street. Boston. Mass. o31-3t 



(Contnued from page 1 ) 
WINCHESTER FOR ALLEN AND BUTLER 



GOVERNOR 

John W. Aiken 
Frank G. Allen 



Alfred Raker Lewis 
Blanks 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


Total 


11 


4 


5 


5 


5 


9 


39 


519 


438 


721 


642 


596 


151 


3067 


0 


2 


2 


0 


0 


2 


<; 


251 


301 


130 


114 


118 


528 


1437 


1 


3 


1 


7 


2 


2 


16 


20 


11 


3 


4 


3 




53 



LIEl'TKNANT GOVERNOR 



SECRET A RY 

Daniel T. Blessington . . . 

Frederic W. Cook 

Albert Spraguc Coolidge 

James: W. Dawson 

Chester J. O'Brien 

Blanks .",2 

TREASURER 

Fred Jifferson Burrell 398 

Eva Hoffmar 5 

Charles E. Hurley 317 

Walter S. HuUhins 3 

Charles S. Oram 2 

Charles Burrill 1 

Blanks Tii 

AUDITOR 



271 178 
0 

301 365 

10 0 



341 301 123 



0 
0 



80 111 




MEDFORD THEATER 



Mat. 2:00 



Eve. 7:00 



Call Mystic 1800 For Reserve Seats 



Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 10, 11, 12 

AL J0LS0N in 

"Mammy" 

Old time minstrel lives again in new songs and new laughs 

BELLE BENNETT is 

"Recaptured Love" 

Comedy drama of a home loving wife 
Sunday Continuous 3 to 11 

Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Nov. 13, 14, 15 

BUSTER KEATON in 

.99 



99 



"Dough Boys 

The scream of the trenches 

"Sins of the Children 

Starring ROBERT MONTGOMERY 

Should parents sacrifice all for their children 



Now Playing 

"LET'S GO NATIVE" and "SWEETHEARTS AND WIVES" 




CAPITAL 

Now Showing 
Marx Brothers in 
"ANIMAL CRACKERS" 

and 

Betty Compson in 
"CZAR OF BROADWAY" 

Mon. Tue*. Wed™ Nov. 10. 11. 12 

RONALD ( (II. MAN and 
KAY FRANCIS in 

"RAFFLES" 

Thrills You Will Never See Again in 
"AFRICA SPEAKS" 

Thurs. Fri. Sat., Nov. 13, 14, 15 

CLAUDETTE COLBERT and 
FREDERIC MARCH in 

"MANSLAUGHTER" 

Jack Oskie and Jesnnette MacDonald 

in 

"LET'S GO NATIVE" 



COMING "Sins of 
"Anybody's Woman; 
the Western Front;' 
"Whoopee;" "Song 
"Amos 'n Andy 



the Children ;" 
"All Quiet on 
"Follow Thru;" 
of My Heart;" 
" "What a Widow" 



MORTGAGEE'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE 

Hy virtue of the power of sale contained in 
a certain mortgage deed given by John P. 
Whitten to the Winchester Co-operative Hank, 
dated January 6, 1930 and recorded with 
Middlesex South District Deeds. Hook .',428. 
Page 68, for breach of the conditions of said 
mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing 
the same will be sold at public auction on the 
premises hereinafter described on Monday, 
December 1. 1930 at nine o'clock in the fore- 
noon, all and singular the premises conveyed 
by said mortgage deed and therein substan- 
tially described as follows: 

"A certain parcel of land with the build- 
ings thi reon situated in Winchester, Middle, 
sex County. Massachusetts, shown as Lot 
numbered 327, ami seventeen 1171 feet of 
Lot 328 nd joining, on plan entitled 'Part One. 
Symmcs Park, Winchester and Medford, Mass.. 
developed by Ronelli-Adams Co.,' by Ernest 
W. Branch. Civil Engineer, dntod June 24, 
192.7. recorded with Middlesex South District 
Deeds, Plan Hook 868, Plan 14. containing 
6.797 square feet more or less, bounded and 
described as follows : 

Southwesterly by Hollywood Road, sixty- 
sown and 50 100 1 67. .70 1 feet; 

Northwesterly bv Ixit 326 on said plan, 
ninety-three and H4 100 (93.X4I feet: 

Northeasterly by land now or formerly of 
W. W. Thomas, sixty-seven 1671 feet; and 

Southeasterly by the remaining portion of 
Lot 328 on said plan, one hundred (100) feet. 

Said premises are subject to restrictions of 
record so far as in force and applicable. Here- 
by conveying the same premises conveyed to 
said John P. Whitten by The Bonelli-Adams 
Investment Corporation, by deed dated Janu- 
ary fi. 1930 and duly recorded with Middlesex 
South District Deeds, herewith." 

Said premises will be sold subji^et to all 
unpaid taxes, tax titles assessments or other 
municipal liens J200.no in cash will be re- 
(Uiinsl to be paid at the time of the sale and 
the balance to be paid within ten 110) days 
from the date of sale at Room R10. 10 State 
Street, Boston, Mass. Other particulars made 
known at time of sale. 

WINCHESTER CO-OPERATIVE BANK. 

Mortgagee 
By Ernest R. Eustis. Treasurer 

For further information apply to Curtis W. 
Nash. 10 State Street, Boston, Mass. n7-3t 



READING THEATRE 

A Playhouse of Distinction 

Matinees at 1:43 P. .M. Evenings at 7:30 P. M. 

Friday and Saturday 
Romantic Crook Drama of Tough Mugs and Fancv Birds! 

"ALIAS FRENCH GERTIE" 

with BEN LYON and BEBE DANIELS 

also 

Comedy Gem of the Season with Bright Dialogue, Rollicking Laughs 
and Brilliant Acting! 

"HE KNEW WOMEN" 

with LOWELL SHERMAN and ALICE JOYCE 



Monday and Tuesday 

Merry Musical Mix-up of 
Laughs, Love and Song! 

"LET'S GO NATIVE" 

with J ACK OAK IE and 
JEAXETTE MacDONALD 
Excitement Galore in 

"THE SQUEALER" 

with JACK HOLT 
Dorothy Revier & Davey I^ee 



Wednesday and Thursday 
The Eirst Lady of the Screen 
Rl'TH CHATTERTON in 

"ANYBODY'S WOMAN" 

with CLIVE BROOK and 
PAI L LOKAS 
and 

"ON YOUR BACK" 

with IRENE RICH and 
H. B. WARNER 



Coming Soon 

"Sons of My Heart" "Whoopee" "Love in the Rough" 
"Madam Satan" "Follow Thru" 



i 
i 

5 

286 
428 
38 



0 
1 
5 
91 
721 
11 



0 

0 
.1 

71 

(57.-) 
21 



1 

0 
3 

100 
600 
20 



6 

2 

1 

504 
135 
•is 




ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Morris 1. Becker 1 

John W. Janhonen o 

John Weaver Sherman 4 

Harold W. Sullivan 232 

Joseph E. Warner 509 

Blanks 56 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

William M. Butler 484 

Marcus A. Coolidge 2S9 

Oscar Kinsalas 3 

Max Lerner 0 

Sylvester J. Mi-Bride 1 

Blanks 25 

CONGRESSMAN— EIGHTH DISTRICT 

John B. Brennan 217 289 120 103 108 518 

Frederick W. Dallinger 519 438 718 651 598 144 

Blanks 30 32 24 18 IS 37 

CO U NT I LLOR — S IXT1I DISTRICT 

John H. Connor 210 299 103 76 100 519 

Joseph 0. Knox 495 111 706 664 584 128 

Blanks 07 49 53 32 10 52 

SENATOR- SIXTH MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 

Charles T. Daley 259 319 lis 91 100 oil 

Charles C. Warren 498 408 706 CM 588 128 

Blanks 45 32 38 30 30 30 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT— 
TWENTY-NINTH MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 

Thomas R. Bateman 608 -120 71 3 

Edward E. Maguire 242 302 108 

Vincent 1'. Clarke 0 1 0 

Blanks 52 30 41 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY— NORTHERN DISTRICT 

Warr-n L. Bishop 500 417 695 659 

John E. Daley 223 205 97 69 

Charles McGlue, Cambridge, o 1 0 0 
Blanks 79 70 70 14 

REGISTER OF PROBATE AND INSOLVENCY- 
MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

John J. Bulter 227 284 114 74 

Lorintr P. Jordan 4S1 400 675 641 

Blanks 94 75 73 57 



100 

668 
50 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER — MIDDLESEX COUNTY 

Erson B. Barlow 491 405 072 645 572 

Robert E. Donovan 210 270 9S 71 93 

Blanks 95 84 92 50 59 



132 
472 



ASSOCIATE COMMISSIONERS 

E. Perry Johnyon 

John M. Keyes 

John J. Noreau, Jr 

Melvin G. Rogers 

Blanks 



-MIDDLESEX COUNTY 



COUNTY TREASURER 

J. Frank Eacev 212 

Charles E. Hatfield 401 

Blanks 126 



200 
395 
98 



109 

007 

80 



70 



7 62 



1 



QUESTION NO. 1— APPORTIONING DISTRICTS 

Yes 331 340 435 414 

No' ". 118 92 93 91 

Blanks 353 327 334 267 

QUESTION NO 2 — REPEAL OF LIQUOR } f ^ W ?OQ 

No* .................. 337 327 500 371 

Blanks HO 73 0,4 71 



88 
507 
09 



381 
74 

20,9 



281 

388 
55 



409 
118 
112 



210 
HI 

378 



461 
140 

98 



QUESTION NO 3 — 

TRAPS, ETC. EOR CAPTURE OF FUR-BEARING ANIMALS 

Yob 4S9 470 678 513 607 .513 

K„ 151 149 173 161 UO 1 SO 

BUtiiks .*..: ™ ^ 111 w 77 206 



4018 



Strabo V. Claggett 


23S 


29S 


128 


121 


115 


521 


1421 


Maria C. Correia 


1 


0 


2 


0 


0 


2 


5 


Stephen J. Surridge 


t; 


2 


1 


1 


1 


4 


15 


Edith M. Williams 


1 


3 


4 


•j 


3 


1 


14 


William Sterling Youngman. 


508 


431 


692 


CIS 


575 


141 


2905 


0 


0 


0 


1 


0 


0 


1 




4S 


25 


35 


so 


29 


30 


197 



4018 



1 


1 


1 


0 


1 


3 


7 


511 


421 


70S 


662 


592 


13S 


3032 


7 


8 


4 


7 


6 


12 


44 


0 


1 


1 


0 


1 


3 


ti 


231 


2S7 


104 


84 


100 


503 


1309 


52 


41 


44 


19 


24 


40 


220 



4018 




4018 



Alon-io B. Cook 




355 


527 


527 


470 


135 


2482 




2 


5 


3 


3 


5 


•". 


21 




204 


340 


242 


192 


175 


50S 


1721 






0 


2 


0 


1 


1 


4 




•> 


0 


1 


0 


1 


I 


8 






59 


87 


50 


66 


48 


382 



4618 



9 
4 

2:: 
1284 
3068 
230 



1385 
3068 
165 



13".7 

2983 
293 



1434 
2979 
205 



CIS 


009 


143 


:;<>u 


84 


94 


500 


1330. 


0 


0 


0 


1 


40 


21 


50 


240 





2917 
1220 
481 



191 


229 


84 


70 


85 


110 


1009 


430 


370 


620 


584 


533 


103 


2652 


176 


215 


73 


49 


or, 


371 


949 


300 


292 


534 


490 


435 


94 


2211 




412 


407 


345 


330 


420 


2355 



1220 
2830 
502 



2111 
519 
1928 



2078 
2009 
471 



2870 
95 1 
78S 



■1018 



4018 



4618 



1018 



4618 



4018 



4018 



■1018 



40,18 



9236 



4018 



■1018 



4018 



4618 



NOTICE IS HEREBY CIVEN that the 
subscriber has been duly appointed executor 
of the will of David A. Carlue late of Win- 
chester in the County of Middlesex, deceased, 
testate, and has taken upon himself that trust 
by giving bond, as the law directs. 

All persons having demands upon the es- 
tate of said deceased arc hereby required to 
exhibit the same: and all persons indebted 
to said estate are called upon to make pay- 

menl GEORGE B. HAYWARD. Executor 

(Address I 
40 Court Street, Roeton, Mass. 

October 29. 1930 o31-3t 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX. SS. PROBATE COURT 

To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and all 
other persons interested in the estate of.j 
Joanna Theresa O'Connell late of Winchester 
ia said County, deceased. 

WHEREAS, a certain instrument purport- 
ing; to be the lant wiil »nd testament of said 
deceased has been presented to said four*, 
for probate, by Daniel L. Brown who prays 
that letters testamentary may be issued to 
him the executor therein named without giv- 
inK a surety on Ms official bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a Pro- 
bate Court to be held at Cambridge in said 
Courty of Middlesex, on the seventeenth day 
of November A. D. 1930, at ten o'clock in i 
the forenoon, to show cause, if any you have, 
why the same should not be granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby directed to 
rive public notice thereof, by publishing this 
citation once in each week, for three succes- 
sive weeks, in The Winchester Star a news- 
paper published in Winchester the last pub- 
lication to be one day, at least, before said 
Court, and by mailing, post-paid, or deliver- 
ing a copy of this citation to all known per- 
sona interested in the estate, seven days at 
least before said Court. 

Witness, JOHN C. LEGGAT^ Esquire. First 
Judge of said Court, this te^nty-fourth day 
of October in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and thirty. 
o31 » LORING P. JORDAN, Register 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. PROBATE COURT 

To all persons interested in the estate of 
Fannie E. Russell late of Winchester in said 
County, deceased: 

WHEREAS, the State Street Trust Company 
the surviving executor of the will of said de- 
ceased, has presented for allowance the first 
account of the administration of itself ami 
Edward M. Moore upon the estate of -ad 
d< » sed : together with the first account of it- 
self as surviving executor of said will, and the 
accountant request* that the items of said 
accounts be finally determined and adjudicated. 

You are hereby cited to ap|>ear at a Pro- 
bate Court, to be held at Cambridge in said 
County, on the seventeenth day of November 
A. D. 1930 at ten o'clock in the forenoon, to 
show cause, if any you have, why the same 
should not be allowed. 

And said executor is ordered to serve this 
citation by delivering a ropy thereof to all 
persons interested in the estate fourteen days 
at least before said Court or by publishing 
the same once in each week, for three succes- 
sive weeks, in The Winchester Star a news- 
paper published in Winchester the last pub- 
lication to be one day at least lief ore said 
Court, and by mailing, post-paid, a copy of 
this citation to all known iiersons interested 
in the estate seven days at least before said 
Court. 

Witness. JOHN C. I. EGG AT, Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, this twenty-third day of 
October in the year one thousand nine hun- 
dred and thirty. 

LORlNf, P. JORDAN, Register 

o81-3t 

WINCHESTER NATIONAL BANK 



tn compliance with the requirements of 
Chapter. 590, Section 40, Acts of 1908, as 
amended by Chapter 491, Section 6. Acts of 
1909, and by Chapter 171. Section 1, Acta of 
1912. notice is hereby given of the losa of 
pass-book No. 13fi0. 

EDWIN M. NELSON. Cashier 

n7-3t 



1(1 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1930 



Here's An Opportunity 

TO BUY A NEW HOUSE AT YOUR OWN PRICE 

PUBLIC AUCTION 

On Monday, November 17th 

AT 9 h. Mi ON T«E PREMISES 

The Winchester Co-operative Bank, in order to sat- 
isfy its claim as first mortgagee, will offer to the highest 
bidder the brand new six room house and 6500 square 
feet of land at 

2 GREELY ROAD (off Myrtle Terrace) 

The house is a reproduction of the early New England 
Colonial type and contains on the first floor a large living 
room with fireplace panelled dining room, modern cup- 
board kitchen, and open porch; on the second floor there 
are three well arranged chambers and tiled bath — attrac- 
tively decorated throughout with period wall papers and 
fixtures. The property is well located on high land and 
represents a much larger investment than the claim of the 
first mortgagee. A Real Bargain for someone. 

OPEN FOR INSPECTION AT THE TIME OF SALE 
OR BY APPOINTMENT WITHOUT ANY OBLIGATION 

Full Particulars of 

Edward T. Harrington Inc. 

39 CHURCH STREET WINCHESTER 1400 

W. Allan Wilde, Auctioneer 




ONCE A WEEK 

is not too often to have Bailey's drivers 

call for a suit to be 
Brushed Glean, Sponged and Pressed 

75c 

BAILEY'S CLEANSERS & DYERS, INC, 



17 ( hurch St. 

Winchester, Mass. 
Tel. Win. 052S 



Watertown, Mass. 
Tel. Mid. J.'.l.l 




Cuu^s, bul QJfi nof qjlirtq, ^ 
ijoar sW of Bum, Lfou 
rruisl \sxjh ow our 

drLssis. Oiou'U bt 
su/f>ru>£cl al thar 




~ nositRt ♦ unotuwfAR ♦ gifts ~ 



Automobile 
Insurance 

$3 down 

BALANCE IN SMALL MONTHLY PAYMENTS 
WELL KNOWN STRONG COMPANIES 



L. W. PUFFER, *Jr. 

557 MAIN STREET WINCHESTER 
TEL. WIN, 1980 — RES. WIN. 1160 

o31-tf 



Coming -Winter Weather 

BUY IN WINCHESTER 

Gloves 

Underwear 
Sweaters 

Storm Coats 

Franklin E. Barnes Co. 

Remember the Needlework Guild 



VERNON W. JONES 
Suburban Real Estate 

31 CHURCH STREET 

WE HAVE just listed a very pood buy in a Duplex House. 3 
rooms each side. A home with an income. Easy terms. Price 
$10,000. 

FOR RENT— Single house of .-even rooms, and bath, 2 -car Ka- 
ra;;". Only $85. 

ALSO many other singles and apartments from $45 up. 

TELEPHONE WINCHESTER 0898 



CAPE COD COLONIAL 

In an i leal setting and within easy access 
to schools and transportation, stands this 
<|uaint Cape Cod Colonial home. Of course 
there is the typical open porch, the attractive 
panelling in the living room, and the old-fash- 
ioned ti replace. 

Briefly seven rooms, which includes the 
customary living room, dining room, kitchen 
and a iruest room with bath on the first floor; 
comfortable chambers and a tiled bath on the 
is also a two-car garage and a large lot of land, 
reputable builder, out of the best quality material, 
attractively. 

For an appointment to inspect call Mr. Puffer. 

HENRY W. SAVAGE, Inc. 

"73 HARVARD STREET, COOLIDGE CORNER, BROOK LINE 
Est is 10 REALTORS Asp. 1501 

WINCHESTER OFFICE, 557 MAIN STRKF.T, TEL. WIN. 1980 
RES. TEL. WIN. 1160 




Walter Chamiing, Inc. 

REALTORS 

FURNISHED HOUSE, S100— Excellent location, near center, 
cheerful, sunny house with garage. 

FAIRLY NEW 7-ROOM, SINGLE COLONIAL- On spacious 
-rounds in high-grade West Side location. Beautiful master's 
chamber with private shower bath. Trice concession to meet 
market. 

Tel. Winchester 0984 
Helen I. Fessenden Resident Representative 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



NEWSY P \RAGRAPHS 



First Church of Christ, Scientist, 
Winchester, cordially invites you to 
a free public lecture on Christian 
Science by Miss M. Ethel Whitcomb, 
C.S.B., of Boston a member of the 
Board of Lectureship of The Mother 
Church, The First Church of Christ, 
Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts, 
on Friday evening, Nov. 21, at 8 
o'clock in the Town Hall, Winchester. 

n7-3t 

Mrs. Louis Whitford Bond and 
son Edward of Brimmer street, Bos- 
ton, were dinner guests at the Greene 
Fireside on Tuesday evening. 

Spencer Corsets, home appoint- 
ments. Jean MacLellan. Tel. Win. 
U40G-R. ap27-tf 

Calendar pads at the Star Office. 

Miss Anne Kimball of Oxford street 
entertained 25 guests at a Hallowe'en 
party at her home last week. 

New and becoming shapes in felt, 
soleil and velvet. Miss Ekman, 17 
Church street. (Bailey's.) * 

Emma J. Prince, Chiropodist. Mas- 
seuse, hours 11-12. 1-5, closed Wed- 
nesday afternoons. Tel. Win. 01o5. 
13 Church street. sl2-tf 

You are cordially invited to attend 
the annual Bazaar at the Crawford 
Memorial Methodist Church, on Fri- 
day, Nov. 14, 10 a. m. to 10 p. m. 
Gifts— useful articles. Food on sale. 
Tea-cup reading by Madame Jean- 
nette of Boston. Dinner $1 served at 
G::S0 p. m. o31-2t 

Send the children to scnool with a 
pel feet hair cut. All hair cutting 40c. 
Sullivan's Lyceum Building Shop. 



First Church of Christ, Scientist, 
Winchester, cordially invites you to 
a free public lecture on Christian 
Science by Miss M. Ethel Whitcomb, 
C.S.B., of Boston a member of the 
Board of Lectureship of The Mother 
Church, The First Church of Christ, 
Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts, 
on Friday evening, Nov. 21, at 8 
o'clock in the Town Hall, Winchester. 

n7-3t 

Dr. and Mrs. Clarence E. Ordway 
and Mr. and Mrs. John Abbott have 
returned to Winchester from a Eu- 
ropean trip which included visits to 
Italy, France and Germany. 



JUNIOR COUNTRY CLUB 

40 Winn Street. Woburn 

GOLF—" mint hrautiful miniature court* 
in New England. 18 holes 5Uc; 
ond round 35r. 
DANCE— Snappy band, Friday and 
Saturday Evening*. P« r eouple. 

EAT — Delirious toasted sandwiches. 

Light ref reahmenta. 
Come in and see our attractive elub- 
Open 12 noon to 12 midnite 



SUNDAYS 1 P. M. to 11 P. M. 

nT-4t 




HENRY GEORGE 

"Seeing clearly is a matter 
of telling the truth to one's 
self; its difficulty has been 
underestimated." 

A PROFESSIONAL eti- 
quette that is above re- 
proach and an understanding 
of the needs of each occasion 
marks our services with dis- 
tinction. 

M0FFETT and McMULLEN 

Funeral Directors and 
Embalmers 

TEL. WIN. 1730 

Lady Assistant Taxi Service 



CHARLES HAGUE 

Cabinet Maker 

Antiques Restored — Furniture Made and 
Repaired — I'phalstered and Polished. 
SHOP, 17 PARK ST.. WINCHESTER 
Tel. Win. IMB-W 

nl5-tf 



You May Have Voted Yes 
Or No On Tuesday 

But you're sure to vote YES in favor of the new Gowns, 
Pajamas and Step-ins, at 



NORMAN V. OSBORNE 

Carpenter and Builder 

1 CLIFF ST. WINCHESTER 
Tel. Win. 2024-W 

«>i;-tf 




for better decorating results 



t 

$ 

si 





use the New Improved 

SHEETEt^CK 

Tin- new imry colored surf . •■ i> hi lily cnli n- 
dered. Paints spread farther and dry out 
evenly. IJjdit eolored pai its np-,il'i d over llsis 
improved surface reti.in tin r nriiurnl clarity 
and freshness. Lt us show you the New Im- 
proved ^hei true 1. Lk fore you build or rcniod si. 

GEORGE W. BLANCHAR0 & CO. 



A. M. EDLEFSON 

REAL ESTATE & MORTGAGES 

FOR SALE 

ON THE WEST SIDE — Near the station, in a quiel location, 
it-room house, is a maximum of comfort at a minimum expense; 
oil heat, electric refrigeration, 2 baths, pleasant gas kitchen, one- 
car Karate. The house is in excellent condition inside and out 
The price is $13,000. 

THREE excellent building lots on West Side. 



10 STATE STREET, BOSTON 



TEL. NUBBARD 1978 



Winchester Office, 2 Thompson Street 
Tel. Win. 2285 Res. Tel. Win. 0700 



We are as near as your telephone 

P. H. HIGGINS WINCHESTER 0606 



IT KENWIN ROAD 



Commercial and Home Photographer 

If you have pictures to be framed a 
telephone call will bring demonstrator. 

Leave your films at Hevey's Pharmacy 
or Star Office for our usual service. 



FOR SALE 

A WELL PLANNED HOME, modern in every respect, located 
on one of Winchesters most exclusive streets. New 7-room house 
with sun room, gumwood finish, lavotory on first floor, -1 chambers, 
dressing room, tiled l>ath with shower, hot water heat, heated pa- 
rage. Large lot of land with shade trees. Priced at SI 1 ,500 with 
terms, makes this a real buy. 

RENTALS — Single houses and apartments, $45 to $150 per 
month. 

S. V. OLSON 

572 MAIN STREET WINCHESTER 
Tel. Win. 0032— Res. 0365 

s20-lf 



RENTALS 

We have at present a number of attractive single 
houses which can be rented at very reasonable figures, 
the rents varying from $75 a month to $150. 

If you are thinking of renting a single house, let us 
submit our list. 



A. Miles Holbrook 

24 Church St.— Win. 1250 Res.— Tel. 0609 

STEPHEN THOMPSON, Win. 0103-W 



Needle Work Guild of America 

This year the Winchester branch of the Needle Work 
Guild, are asking for better, warmer gifts than usual, in an- 
ticipation of this winter. They feel the calls may be more 
abundant and more urgent than before. Let us do our part. 
Buy early and help those less fortunate than ourselves. 

We have as usual a fine line of L'nderwear, Stockings, 
Gloves and Mittens, Night Robes, Blankets and Comforters. 
In fact most anything you might desire to buy for one less 
fortunate. 



Merchandise was never more attractive than this year. 
We are already showing bright new things suitable for Holi- 
day Gifts. 

Have you seen our Christmas Wrappings and Cards? 
AGENT FOR CASH'S WOVEN NAMES 



G. Raymond Bancroft 



Til. Win. 067 l-W 



16 Mt. VtrMa Strtaf 



V 



THE WINCHESTER 



B * A r y , 




VOL. L NO. Hi 



WINCHESTER, MASS, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1930 



PRICE SEVEN CENTS 



C. I) OF A. INSTALLATION 

D. I>. Frances Ahearn of Arling- 
ton, with an assisting suite, in- 
stalled the officers of the local Court 
o-i Thursday evening of last week. 

Following the ceremony, I'. I). L). 



MURRAY— CALLAHAN 



MRS. 



( '. MeL>< naiil presented to 
Regent, Mrs. Frame.- T. 
string of crystal exqui- 
with ear-drops to match. 
R. Conlon then i resented flowers 
the District Df.puty and her a-- 



Elizabeth 
the (Iran 
Conlon a 
sitely cut 

<;. 

to 



aisting Monitor. An attractive buf- 
fet luncheon was served by the fol- 
lowing numbers: Lecturer Katharine 
Rowen, Sentinel Nora O'Melia, Pro- 
phetess Mary Ryan and past lectur- 
er Anna Swymer. 

Readings and songs were con- 
tributed by G. K. Conlon and I'D. 
Frances Ahearn. Dancing followed. 



The marriaei 
Callahan, daueh 
J. E. ( allahan 
street, to Daniel 
ham took place 
in St. Mary's Rectory with 
of St. Mary's Church, Rev. 



of Miss Margaret 
er of Mr. and Mis. 
of 1«S Washington 
A. Murray of Stone- 
Wednesday evening 
the pastor 
Nathaniel 



LIZZIE WHITCOMB 
ADRIANCE 



M. 

Reports 



C. W. G. NOTES 



from the stat" committee 
in charge of the matinee whist and 
bridge to be held on Saturday. Nov. 
15 at Boston, indicate a large at- 
tendance from the various branches. 

Sunday, Nov. S.', is Guild Day at 
the Holy Ghost Hospital at which 
time talent from the branches will 

contribute to a concert program for 
the patients. 

The business meeting for Novem- 
ber was held last evening at the 
home of Mrs. John Harrold, followed 
by a social hour. 
'The social meeting for this month 

Will I"' held at a time and place to 

be announced later in the Star. 



J. Merritt, officiating. 

Miss Callahan was attended bv 
Misa Mildred Hargrove of Arlington 
and Mr. Murray had for his best man 
the bride's brother, Christopher L. 
Callahan of Winchester. 

The bride wore a gown of robin's 
egg blue chiffon with hat and slippers 
to match, and carried a shower bou- 
quet of bride's roses and lilies of the 
valley. Miss Hargrove wore pale 
pink chiffon with matching hat and 
slippers, and carried an arm bouquet 
of Talisman roses. 

A reception was held at the home 
of the bride's parents, fall foliage 
and tall vases of chrysanthemum - 
being artistically arranged as deco- 
rations. A catered wedding supper 
was served, and Mr. Murray and his 
bride hft to spend their honeymoon 
in Bermuda. Upon their return they 
will make their home in Winchester. 
The bride, who is widely know 



tel 



1 Winch 
j private si 
i & Co. [nc 
I associated 
I ton firm 



emp 



if W. 
MOTHERS 



, has Ik "ii 
retarv by 
of Boston. Mr. 
is salesman w it 
L. Feme & 



ii in 
oyed as a 
Is Furber 
Murray i.^ 
i the Bos- 
Sons. 



AM) FATHERS 



BUILDING 

Bui 



PERMITS GRANTED 



lb 

wk won 



w we 
i 



ici 



ing permits have been issued 
by the Building Commissioner for 
week ending Nov. 13 as follows: 

K. ( '. and I ». E. Hadley, Winches- 
ter new outside chimney on dwell- 
ing at 193 Forest street. 

Bernard 1'.. Eckberg, Woburn — ex- 
cavation only of four houses, 1-2-5-6 
Lantern lane. 



ll you 

■■;;!f-cot 
nl \vhe« 

my thing 



High S 

of doii 
.site sex. 

Are you pro\ iding 
recreation which will hel 
and girls overcome his 
men? If not, why not s 



must remember that 
r>n e cious period in 
" yi u had a horror 
before the 0 pp •. 



.' means of 
> your boys 
embarrass- 
md them to 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 
Di 



Contagious 
Hoard of Hi 
Thursday, No 
Whooping C< 



ises reported to the 
alth for week ending 
v. 13 were one case of 
Ugh and one case of 



cms! 
spec- 
boy; 



Pulmonary Tuberculosis. 

Maurice Dinneen, Agent 



NEWST PARAGRAPHS 



b 

of the Rl 
At. the 
Middlesex 
"ay. held 



Miss Mary Carr of Highland ave- 
nue, president of last year's graduat- 
ing class at Radcliffe College, has 
ed to the executive board 
dcliffe Club of Boston, 
installation of officers of 
Chapter, Order of De Mo- 
last Saturday evening in 
Reading, Mr. Wilbur S. Locke of Win- 
chester presented the retiring master 
councillor, Horace C. Ford, with a 
master councillor's jewel. William F. 
Miller of Winchester was installed as 
treasurer of the chapter. 

The annual donation and reception 
was held yesterday at the Home for 
Aged People on Mt. Vernon street 
and as usual attracted a lareo Cath- 
erine; of visitors and friends of the 
family at the home. 

There has been some complaining 
of the big trucks which have been 
going through Winchester, hauling 
gravel from Montvale to the con- 
struction job in progress at South 
Border road. 

Adolph Gravel of 99 Norway 
street, Boston, was arrested at 9:30 
last niirht by Sergt. Thomas F. Cas- 
sidy of the Police Department after 
the Chevrolet coach be was driving 
north on Cambridge street was in 
collision with a Ford roadster, beaded 
south on Cambridge street and driven 
by Helen K. Roche of Lowell. The 
accident occurred south on Wildwood 
street and both cars were damaged, 
it being necessary to tow Gravels 
machine to the Central Garage. Of- 
ficer Hlltchins of the Metropolitan 
Police was at the scene of the acci- 
dent when Sergeant Cassidy arrived. 
Gravel was charred with operating a 
motor vehicle while under the influ- 
ence of liquor. He appeared in the 
District Court this morning. 

A lead-off from a water main in 
the center between the police box 
and the car tracks burst vosterday 
afternoon about 3 o'clock. Water he- 
Ban to bubble un through the road- 
wav and Sunt. Harry W. Dotten of 
the Water Departm"nt was notified. 
Superintendent Dotten judged the 
position of the break correctly and 
his men had the damage repaired at 
f>:30. , , 

"Bob" Guild, old Harvard coach 
and lineman wps oiv> of the officials 
at the St. Mark's— Groton came at 
Southboro on Wednesday and is to 
work in the big schoolboy classic the 
Andover— Essex game at Andover 
on Saturday. Another who Ja likely 
to be at Andover is "Charlie 
Newell, who claims he hasn t missed 
an Andover -Exeter pame in 30 
years. After watching "( barlte 
push the crowd back at the Water- 
town game last Saturday we .lust 
can't believe he's such an old tuner. 

The condition of Motorcycle Officer 
John F Hoe-an of the Police Depart- 
ment who has been seriously ill is re- 
ported as much improved. It will be 
some time, however, before he is able 
to return to duty. In his absence the 
motorcvele detail is being filled by 
Officer Vdward W. (VConnell. 

Mrs. Harrv S. Griffin. Mrs. William 
K. Denison. Mr*. Frank H. Knight. 
Mrs. Reginald Bradlee. Mrs. Alfred 
White, Mrs. William I. Palmer. Mrs. 
J. F. Rvan. Mrs. William E. Clark. 
Mrs. Rov O. Went worth and Mrs. 
Frederick Y. Stephens are patron- 
esses for the first Boston appearance 
at the Hotel Copley Plaza, Friday- 
morning. Nov. 21. of the Grand Duch- 
ess Marie of Russia. This function 
is under the auspices of the Massa- 
chusetts League of Women Voters, 
the Grand Duchess speaking at 11 
o'clock on "My Escape from Russia 
— and Since." 



Mrs. Page's Wednesday evening 
in tap dancing which she has e 
ially arranged to accommodate 
and girls of High School ace? 

Tap dancing is at present one of 
the most popular types of recreation. 
Its fascinating, lively rhythm per- 
formed to th ■ latest popular music 
provides exercises that are exhilarat- 
ing to both mind and body. The work 
also eneourajres the group spirit 
among students. 

If you are interested to have your 
children join the class for an hour 
of clean, wholesome fun on Wednes- 
day evenings from 7:30 to H-.'M), call 
Pearl Bates Morton, Win. 0993, fur 
further information. 

Older people are also accepted 
for this work. 

MKS. ROSE FLANDERS 

Mrs. Rose Flanders, widow of Jo- 
seph A. Flanders and mother of Ly- 
man A. Flanders of 13 Winthrop 
street, died early Wednesday mora- 
ine. Nov. 13 at her home. 211 High- 
land avenue. Mrs. Flanders was HO 
ytars of ace and was born in Paw- 
tucket, R. f. She spent much of her 
life in Somerville and had been a 
resident of Winchester only for the 
past three weeks. 

Besides Mr. Flanders, she is sur- 
vived by live daughters, Mrs. Marion 
F. McKay, Mrs. Charlotte Albertini, 
Miss Rose Flanders, all of Winches- 
ter; Mrs. Jane Moen of Somerville 
and Mrs. Sadie Spofford of Boston. 
Another son. Joseph Flanders of New 
York City, also survives. 

The funeral will be held from the 
late residence Saturday morning with 
a solemn requiem high mass in St. 
Mary's Church at '.» o'clock. Inter- 
ment will be in Mt. Auburn Ceme- 
tery. 



Mrs. Lizzie Whitcomb Adriance, 
! wife of the Rev. S. Winchester Adri- I 
i ance and a well known resident of | 
j Winchester, died at midniirht on Wed- ; 
i nesday, Nov. 12, at her home, :< Mt. 
| Pleasant street, after a six weeks' ; 
I illness. She suffered a broken hip in ; 
I a fall at her home last May and un- 1 
[ derwent treatment at the Winches- 
| ter Hospital until July when she re- j 
] turned to her home. Since that time; 
i she had been unable to get about, and 
: her health crew gradually worse un- . 
1 til the end. 

' -Airs. Adriance was 74 years old and j 
; a native of Southbridge, the daughter I 
of Rev. William ('.. and Harriet j 
(Wheeler) Whitcomb. Her father en- 1 
tered the service as an Army Chap- i 
lain during the Civil War. and died in 
the great struggle to preserve the 
Union. 

limine her early years Mrs. Adri- 
ance led the usual life of a preacher's 
daughter, moving about from place to 
place as her father became identified 
with various parishes. Her education 
was received in the schools of Con- 
cord and at Abbott Academy in An- 
dover. 

Oct. lfi, 1*77, she was married to 
Rev. S. Winchester Adriance. and in 
1890 came to Winchester where she 
had since made her home. She had 
a wide circle of acquaintances and 
friends among the oiler resident- of 
the town and was active in the work 
of the First Congregational Church, 
of which she was a member. She also 
held membership in the Woman's 
Fortnightly Club and in the Winches- 
ter Woman's Republican Club. 

Surviving, besides her husband, are 
a daughter, Mrs. Frederic B. With- 
ington of Honolulu, Hawaii, and a son 
Robert I. Adriance of Fast Orange, N 
J. A brother. Albert W. Whitcomb of 
Webster, N. Y.. and a sister. Mrs. 
Ripley Bartlett of Concord, also 




ROTARY CLUB 



LEGION 



OBSERVED 
DAY 



ARMISTICE 



Winchester Post. 
glOn s observance i 



en- 
by 



vive with six grandchildren, 

Funeral services will be held on this 
Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock in the 
late residence with the Rev. Howard 
J. Chidley, pastor of the First Congre- 
gational Church, officiating. Inter- 
ment will be in Sleepy Hollow Ceme- 
tery, Concord. 



i'7. American Le- 
if Armistice Day 
ocean Monday evening with the big 
re-Ainiistae Day Bail in the Town 
| Hall. 1 his proved to be a most 
: joyable party, and was attended 
many Legionnaires in uniform. 

Music was furnished by "Jack" Hen- 
nessy's orchestra, and the hall was 
at t> actively decorated with flags and 
palms. At 11 o'clock Comdr. Wade L. 
Grindle called for a two-minute pause 
in ttie merrymaking as a tribute to 
those who cave their lives tor the 
cause of Democracy in the World War. 
The Legionnaires stood rigidly at at- 
tention while tai» was blown by a 
trumpeter. Refreshments wire served 
durinc the evening by members of the 
I'ost Auxiliary. 

Vice Comdr. I'. T. Foley served a- 
chairman of the ball committee and 
was assisted by Kingman I'. Cass. 
Hairy Goodwin, (I. Warren Johnston 
and Richard Parkhurst. 

Fifty uniformed member;- of the 
Post went to Woburn Armistice Day 
forenoon to march in the big parade 
in that city. The delegation was head- 
ed by Commander Grindle with Vice 
Comdr. P. T. Foley and Adit. Harry 
Goodwin as aids. The Legion detach- 
ment was led by George F, LeDuc. 
George Donaghey and Whitelaw 
Wright were color bearers and the 
Post firing squad under Harry Ben- 
nett served as color guard. 

The Legionnaires fell out of the 
parade at the Woburn Armory, and 
returned to Winchester for their own 
Armistice Day exercises at the Wat- 
Memorial. These exercises followed 
tile same impressively simple form as 
sur- j those of last year. A wreath was 



Twenty-four members and cicht 
visitors comprised the attendance list 
at the meeting of Nov. i::. As three 
of our members had previously made 
up for their absence at this meeting, 
there is but one stalwart to he heard i 
from. Clarence Brown of the Rotary I 
Club of Conway. N. H. . held the lone 
distance record for visitors. 

President Lorine announced that no 
formal entertainment had been pro- 
vided for the day and suggested that 
the meeting be given over to the dis 
cussion of various problems before the 
club which await solution, and possi- 
bly the relation of narratives of 
mild flavor and doubtful antiquity. 

As a result our meeting was ol 
great interest, certainly to ourselves 
and we hope to our visitors also, he- 
cause of the fact that we considered 
several matters which come before 



COMING EVENTS 

• N ,"». Kn,,a >' Annual Hio.aar of Craw. 
lord-Memorial Method l»t rhur.-h. Dinner at 

Nov. 15, Saturday, 
Calumet Club at 8 p. m. 

i\ Tumday. Maiden Club at c«:um,-t 
en Mystic Valley U-airue ir»mi s at 



Moving picture* at 



N 
Clul> 
B p, i 
Nov 
' cheat, 
Nov 
ing i 
lloMnl 
nir, tlnn 

N 



IS. Tueaday. Regular meeting-, Win- 
l.".ivc ,,f Lyceum Hall at > ,• m 

is. Tueadaj Ladies' friendly meet- 
l ni tartan Parish How. Executive 
meeta at 1:30 ,„ Neighborhood 
- ISO |i, m MuKic. Tin. 

Wednesday, j m Church of 
Hi- Epiphany iwh Hall Rummage Sale 

101,1 20 .Wednesday and Thursday, 
ol tin- Florence Crittenton 
Copley Plana, Boston, Both 
■lays, I rem in ,,. m . until in p, ,„ 
... Thursday. Annual eh 

Winchester Lodge ,,f Elks 



Nov l'l 

Annual Baa 
League at th,. 



»ritj Hall „f 
Town Hall nl 8 



I'll. M, 

mi nt< 



Friil.-o 

yal An 



Regular meeting of Win- 
ii t hapter. Masonic Apart- 



Friday Dam,. ;it Calumet Club 
auspices ,.f Winchester Boat Club. 

learry all Retarv Clubs sooner or la- I n " S*>«»ce in Town Hai? l wTm" l< 

ill ■» 1 1 clock. 



Nov 
under 

Nov 



21, 



ter, and further, because several of 
our visitors entered into the discus- 
sion and cave us the benefit of their 
experience. We are convinced that 
an occasional hour of this sort is most 
helpful both to the club itself and to 
it.- individual members 

President Loring appointed a spec- 
ial committee to provide entertain- 
ment during the month of December. 
Marry Wood. George Welsch and 
George Davidson will serve. Judging 
from the make-up of this committee 
none of us will care to miss a single 
one of the December gatherings. 

There will be only one more meet- 
ing in November as the club has vot- 
ed to omit the meeting which falls on 
Thanksgiving. We have an excellent 
opportunity to secure a month of 100 



-t. 



Wednesday, 
Dramatic 



Nov. : 

St. Ma 
) Kay." 
| Dec. 

Dance 
i Church 
; tickets, 

Dec 6, Saturday, 
i Hall at 3 an, | g , 
; Parent Teach, r .<.. 



m 



> P. 
Circle 



Da n. 

5, Friday, 8:30 p n 
an. I Bridge, First 
Parish House. Call 



Ti i\v n 
presi nts 



Hall. 

"Oh 



Group Nine 
Congregational 
Win Q84I for 



Hy 



• I P iet ii res in Town 
Auspices Wadleigh 



per cent meetings. 

Attendance for 
cent. 



What say 
Nov. 6 — 



you 
100 



per 



TOWN TEAM TO PLAY 
PATRICK'S 



ST. 



OUR OFFER 



In accordance with our usual 
ciisinm. ill nn, subscriptions to 
the S I Alt received up to the 
first of the year, will be given 
a January first dating. This of. 
fer applies only to new subscrib- 
ers who haw not previously 
taken this paper. Subscribe now 
and receive the remaining issues 
this .war free. 



MUSIC GARDEN 



WHAT DARTMOUTH 
TANSEY 



THINKS OF 



(From "The Dartmouth," the College 
Daily) 

One of the closest followers of 
Dartmi uth football this year has 
been "Joe" Tansey, who was captain 
of the Norwich team of last fall. 
Tansey now is an adopted son of 
Hanover, as he is head coach of the 
Clark School football team, which 
has lost only one game this year and 
that to the * Dartmouth freshmen. 

This Saturday there will be a came 
between the Clark School and Troy 
Conference Academy which should 
be well worth watchinc for the peo- 
ple who do not make the trip to 
Ithaca, and the game will start suf- 
ficiently early to allow any specta- 
tors to also take in the Gridcranh ac- 
count of the Cornell — Dartmouth af- 
fair. There has been a renaissance 
of Clark School football this year un- 
der Tansey and what little we have 
seen of the squad impresses as very 
likely looking material, reinforced bv 
some smart running backs. — f Phil 
Sherman in "X-Ray on Sports." 



The first fall meeting of the Music 
Garden was held at the Home for the 
Aged People on Mt. Vernon street on 
Monday evening, Nov. 10, and took 
the form of an entertainment f> r the 
inmates. 

The program was as follows: 

Selection liy Orchestra Serenade 
Soprano Soto "last Rose nf bummer" 
Miss MacXellan 

Trio "Th,,u Mighty Ocean" .. . Richardson 
Mr. and Mrs. Trudcau and Mrs. Lochman 

Duet "The Singing 1. ossein" 

Mrs. Morrison and Mr. Lochman 
Mrs. Lochman at the piano 

Violin Solos - 
un "Berceuse" 

(b) "Old Oaken Bucket" with variations 
Miss Littlefield 
Mr-. Andrews at the piano 

Soprano Soles - 

on "The Wood Pigeon" 
(b) "The Banjo Song" 

Mrs. Hughes 
Miss Wilcox at the piano 
Trumpet Solo -"The Honeysuckle Polka" 
Mr. Talone 
Mrs. Lochman at the piano 
Tenor Solo— "Nigger and the Coon" 
Mr. Lochman 
Mrs. Lochman at the piano 
Soprano Solo— "All Joy he Thine" 
Mrs. Morrison 
Mrs. Lochman at the piano 
Medley of Patriotic Airs 

Orchestra 

The whole program was of a "very- 
pleasing nature, but probably the 
numbers most enjoyable, were the hu- 
morous numbers, "The Singing Les- 
son" and the "Nigger and the Coon." 
Durinc the latter number Mr. Loch- 
man temporarily dropped the mantle 
of dignity from his shoulders and 
cave a rollicking illustration of a 
colored centleman during a successful 
"coon" hunt with the "jubilee" fol- i 
lowing. j 

Mention should also be made of the 
trumpet solo by Mr. Talone. which 
was rendered in a masterful manner. 



| placed at the base of the statue by 
I Commander Grindle, three volleys 
| were fired by the firing squad and taps 
i was blown by two Boy Scout buglers, 
j Henry Fitts and Paul Wentworth. 
! Charles Main and William McGann 
I were drummers. 

I Following the exercises at the me- 
| morial, ranks were reformed and the 
. Legionnaires returned to their head- 
1 quarters where they fell out, the day's 
' program being ended. 



COULD YOU BUY INSURANCE 
LIKE THIS FOR SI A YEAR 

j Isn't it a comforting thine to know 
! that in case of disaster we have an 
■ organized society ready to help us. 
. and that membership in this society, 
with all the benefits it entails, costs 
I us but $1 a year. 

i We Americans expect the Red Cross 
I to step in at once in any and all dis- 
asters, but are we doing our full share 
in helping to support this splendid 
organization? Every single one of 
j us is asked to become a member, and 
| we should look upon the invitation as 
a privilege. 
| How many of the dollars we own 
I are spent for such noble work as that 
'done by the Red Cross? 
| We should remember, too. that it 
I is not the other fellow's dollar that 
j is going to insure us against disas- 
I ter, but our own. 

lA't us make up our minds to help 
j this year, when there is so much hu- 
I man distress, by joining the Red Cross 
I during the annual roll call, Nov. 11- 



The Winchester Town Team is un- 
dertaking an ambitious program this 
Sunday afternoon when it will meet 
the strong St. Patrick's Catholic Club 
eleven of Cambridge at 2:30 at Cam- 
bridge Park. 

St, Patrick's is one of the best 
teams the locals have faced this sea- 
son, having won from the Lincoln 
Town Team and played such teams as 
the Roche Club and the Waltham 
Alumni. The Cambridge Club has a 
record of four wins in six starts, and 
will test Winchester to the limit. 

Cambridge Park may be reached by 
taking Cambridge street from Lech- 
mere Square or from Massachusetts 
avenue out of Harvard square. Kick- 
off at 2:30. 




It 



of di 

list t 
Nov. 
mitti 



CALUMET CLUB NOTES 
plas 



is now 
mces at the 
o take plaei 
21, at 
will run 




to hold a series 
Hie first in the 
ay evening, 
The com- 
these dances every 
. that of next week being 
luspiceaAf the Winchester 
A s^HHfy orchestra will 
encaeed : „,d th^Wniiniil <„,,, ,,f 
at) cents will be chaffed. K. 
Pratt is chairman of the 



other weel 
under the 
Boat Club 
be 



fennel h 
committee. 



HAS PETITIONED FOR HEARING 



FLORENCE CRITTENTON NOTES 



Hav, 
called 
Priest 
Bank. 



your dollar ready when it is 
if r, or send it to Mr. William 
at the Winchester Savings 



WINCHESTER GIRLS TIED 
WINTHROP 



Fireman J. Fdwarrl Noonan, driver 
of Eneino •'! of the Fire Department, j 
which figured in a collision wdth an | 
! automobile at Church and Bacon 
streets last Sunday afternoon, has pe- 
titioned Chief David H. DeCourcy for 
a hearing unon the accident which re- 
sulted in injury to Mrs. Emily N. La- 
tremore of 11 Lawrence street who 
was driving the pleasure car involved. 

Driver Noonan was relieved of du- 
ty, following the accident, and sus- 
pended Monday morning by Chief De- 
Courcy. ponding the result of the 
hearing wh ; cb will nrobably be held 
in the near future. The exact date has 
not been announced. Mrs. Latremore, 
who was at first thought to have b»en 
badly injored in th" ncc'ilent was dis- 
charged from the Winchester Hos 
tal on Monday. 

AN AIRPLANE VACATION 



Th. 
ence 



tin- 



MORE ACCIDENTS 



WINCHESTER GIRL 
ALL BOSTON 



CHOSEN 
TEAM 



ON 



Janit Nichols, star left wing nn 
the Winchester High School field 
hockey team for the past two sea- 
sons, was chosen for that position on 
the honorary all-Boston public school 
eleven at the final tryouts yesterday 
on Newton High field. 

Janet is the third Winchester girl 
to win this honor. Dorothea MacKen- 
zie and Carolyn Mercer having been 
previously chosen. The first named 
is one of the stars of the present high 
school team and is also captain and 
forward on the basketball club. She 
is popular with her classmates and 
serves as cheer leader at the football 
games. 



The Board of Selectmen will meet 
with the County Commissioners on 
Dec. 12 t 0 relocate parts of Main 
street and High street, as the result 
of a petition to that effect made by 
the Board. The relocation of Main 
street is from its junction with High- 
land avenue through Symmes cor- 
ner to its junction with Madison 
avenue. 



Frank Reego of 308 Washington 
street reported to the police that as 
he was backing his Ford truck from 
the driveway at his home at 1:25 on 
Armistice afternoon, he was obliged 
to stop to permit an electric car to 
pass. A Pontiac sedan, registered 
to Pearson Brothers, Inc., of 73 Wat- 
er street, Boston, tried to go between 
the electric and his truck, colliding 
with the latter ami scratching the 
side of the sedan. 

Joseph P. Haggerty of 1(51 Swan- 
ton street reported to the police that 
as he was getting out of his Ford 
car which was standing on upper 
Main street in front of the "Roma" 
drug store at 8:40 Wednesday even- 
ing a Dodge sedan, headed south, 
struck the open door of his car ant 
damaged it. Haggerty followed the 
driver of the Dodge. Walter N. Pud- 
sey of ">8 Russell street, Medford. 
and overtook him in front of the 
Gulf Filling Station. Both operators 
went to Police Headquarters. 

At 9:30 yesterdav morning a Buick 
coach, owned by Mrs. Frances M. 
Symmes of 22 Chisholm road and 
driven by her son, Richard M. 
Symmes, was in collision with' a 
Dodge sedan, owned by Katherine 
Goggin of 22 Highland avenue and 
operated by Edmund A. Goggin of 
the same address. The accident oc- 
curred on Forest street at Forest 
circle, and according to the police 
took place when the Buick attempted 
to pass another car when the Dodge 
was making a left turn into Forest 
circle. The Dodge was injured in 
the rear and the Buick about the 
front and rear. Mrs. Symmes. who 
was riding with her son. complained 
of injuries to her back, and was tak- 
en to her home by a nearby house- 
holder in his car. 



Winchester High School girls' field 
i hockey team played a scoreless tie 
I with the Winthrop High girls in an 
j interscholastic league match at Win- 
throp Wednesday afternoon. As a 
j result of this tie Winchester will have 
/ to meet the winner of the Melrose — 
1 Winthrop game to determine the 
i championship of the Northern Divi- 
/ sion of the league. Between the halves 
! of the varsity game the Winchester 
seconds won a 2 — 0 game from the 
Winthrop seconds, Hess ion scoring 
| both goals for Winchester. 

The summary of the varsity game 

[ WINCHESTKK WINTHROP 

Williams, r« Iw, Caw ley 

Abbott, rw 

Kendrick, ri 

' Poland, cf ci. 

Little, li 

J. Nichols. Iw rw, 

Tompkins, rhb 

Carl, 'ton. ehh 

C. Nichols, rhb 

Kinir. Ifb 

Thompson. If fa 

Shaw, rfb [lb, Brennenu 

Keepers, vc K, (iiarla 



Winthrop 0. t'm- 
Barry. Time- Two 



.lw, 

li. Bradley 
Hutchinson 
. . . . ri, Sinatra 
Wi Harrington 
...lhb. Houtth 
. . . . chb. I. each 
. lhb, Kaumelcr 
. . rfb, Crowley 



Kowle, 

Score Winchester 0, 
pires -Whitehead and J. 
l ."> minute periods. 



I WINCHESTER AT MAYNARD 



Winchester High journeys to May- 
nard tomorrow afternoon for a foot- 
ball came with Maynard High 
School. A year ago Maynard brought 
a smart, hustling little eleven to 
Winchester, and an interesting game 
was the result. 

The locals do not expect anything 
easy at Maynard tomorrow, especial- 
ly in view of the fact that Maynard 
held the strong Stoneham High team 
to a 13 — 7 victory. Neither "Patsy" 
Tofuri nor "Eddie" Hitchborn was 
able to play at Watertown last Sat- 
urday because of injuries, but Coach 
Mansfield hopes to have both ready 
for the whistle tomorrow. Kickoff 
at 2:30 p. m. 



Alaska and back by airplane is to 
be the subject of an after-dinner talk 
bv Mr. Lawrence Lombard on Thurs- 
day evening the 2<Kh of November 
when he is to be the guest speaker 
for the annual dinner of the Men's- 
Club of the First Congregational 
Church. 

Mr. Lombard who is a resident of 
Winchester spent a most interesting 
and thrilling vacation during the past 
summer when he traveled in his own 
airplane across the states and north- 
ward into Alaska. Polar bear hunt- 
ing added excitement to his stav in 
the north. He chose the southern 
air route for the return trip. 

Interesting moving pictures taken 
on this journey will be shown during 
his talk at the Men's Club. 



■ big annual bazaar of the Flor- 
Crittenton League, which U to 
be held in the Copley Plaza Hotel 
Boston, on Wednesday and Thursday,' 
Nov. l!l and 2(1, is to combine many 
features which promise to he of 
Usual interest. 
^ Winchester Circle, with Mrs. Arthur 
S. K'elley as chairman, is to be in 
charge of the handkerchief table 
which is to offer for sale both domes- 
tic and imported handkerchiefs and 
sachets, much in demand as holiday 
gifts. 

On Wedensday there N to hi' a 
fashion show at 3 o'elock for which 
tickets can be obtained from Mrs. 
William Little, Win. 1405. The show 
is to b«> reneated in the evening at 
8:30. On Thursday then- is to be a 
bridge. Tickets and further informa- 
tion can be obtained from Mrs. Har- 
ris S. Richardson, Win. Ofi.37, A de- 
licious luncheon and simper will be 
served on both days of the bazaar. 



OBSERVED 
DING 



FIFTY-FIFTH WED- 
ANNIVERSARY 



Mr. and Mrs. Daniel B. Badger of 
12 Prospect street quietly observed 
the oath anniversary of their marriage 
on Monday, Nov. 10. members of their 
immediate family being present to of- 
fer congratulations and best wishes 
for continued happiness. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Badger enjoy fairly- good 
health, and Mr. Badger is still active 
in the business, in which he started 
work 64 years ae". 



SEVERAL FIRES MONDAY AND 
TUESDAY 



The Fire Department was called at 
12:31 Monday afternoon to put out a 
grass fire at the rear of the residence 
of M>'. ('. J. Ganong, 110 Washington 
street. At 12:""i n. m. there was a 
grass fire on High street near the 
residence of Mr. Harry Locke, and at 
">:0:: ii. m. there was another grass 
fin- along the railroad tracks near the 
freight house. 

The first run of the holiday came at 
11:50 a. m. for an incinerator fire on 
Manchester road. At 1:1.'! in the af- 
ternoon the men were called to the 
home of R. A. Hull at 7 Glengarry to 
put out a fire caused by an over-heat- 
ed electric iron. A brush fire in the 
rear of the New Hope Baptist Church 
was reported by Mr. John Russell at 
5:58 n. m., and at 0:38 p. m. Mr. J. E. 
Culprit reported burning rubbish at a 
vacant house on Ix-banon street. 



CHARITY BALL THURSDAY 
EVENING 



Police Department has a new 
touring car purchased from 



The 
Ford 

Bonnell Motors Co 



The annual charity ball of Winches- 
ter Lodge, 1445, B.'P. O. E., will be 
held on Thursday evenine. Nov. 20, in 
the Town Hall from 8 until 1 o'clock. 
The proceeds will be devoted to the 
charitable enterprises in which the 
lodge is interested. 



Dr. F. W. Hill sailed Sunday on the 
motorship Britannic from Boston for 
his home in Gloucestershire, England, 
after a visit in Winchester with his 
sister, Caroline Hill of Winthrop 
street. 



W FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

OF WINCHESTER 

Rev. Benjamin P. Browne, Minister 



SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16 

9:30 A. M. — Church School 
10:45 A. M. — "My Idea of the Word of God" 

Chorus and Quartette 

7 P. M. — "The Principal Preparedness" 

Radio 'Cellist Chorus Baritone Soloist 

THE HOUSE OF FRIENDSHIP WELCOMES YOU 



2 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY. NOVEMBER U. )930 




It Is Not Too Late To 
Join Our 1931 Tax Club 




OCTOBER DIVIDEND ON REGULAR DEPOSITS 
AT THE RATE OF 



5% 



Winchester Savings Bank 



26.MT.VERNON ST. 

BUSINESS HOURS 8AMT03PM V 




^ Wl N CH EST E R, MASS 

lity/ , 

SATURDAYS8A.WOI2M.-nO 830 RM 



INCORPORATED 1871 



PIANOFORTE PI PILS OF ANNIE 
SOULE LEWIS IN AUTUMN 
RECITAL A NT > SOCIAL 



i WINCHESTER HOSPITAL CHIL- 
DREN'S WARD 



WE CARRY THE WELL KNOWN 

Endicott-Johnson Shoes 

Al! solid, good leather, calf skin uppers, first selec- 
tion oak outsoles, sole leather counters, combination lasts. 

MEN'S WORK SHOES $2.75 to $5.00 

MEN'S DRESS SHOES $4.00 and $5.00 

Also shoes for all the family. 

Every day now we are receiving shipments of care- 
fully selected holiday goods, toys and novelties. 

Call often and let us help you plan your Christmas 

list. 



Winchester Dry Goods Co. 



Everyone is interested in sick chil- 
dren. Everyone wants to be sure that 
tin- children in their community air 
adequately provided for in sickness. 
This makes the recent addition to the 
children's ward at the Winchester 
Hospital especially appealing in its 
interest. 

Several kind friends of the hospital 
have made possible the enlarging of 
this ward. Plans for this improvement 
began t" take form last spring and the 
wnil; was completed early this fall. 
| | Tin- children's ward now provides 
| for accommodation of eight patients 
! j —six ii\ the ward and two in a semi- 
I i private room across the corridor, 
jj The equipment is absolutely up-to- 
I date. There are cubicle walls of met- 
! al. and glass separates one bed from 
j I another, thus reducing cross infection 
• j tu the minimum. Each bed lias ;i 
" headrest and adjustable sides. By the 
| use of the headre.-t the children can 

j 



The Autumn Recital and Social, 
g-iven last Friday evening in Fort- 
nightly Hail by Mrs. Annie Soule 
Lewis and her pianoforte pupils, was 
one of the most enjoyable events of its 
Kind given by Mrs. Lewis in her years 
of local teaching. 

Present and former pupils appeared 
upon the program, the quality of 
which was most favorably commented 
upon by the enthusiastic audience, 
composed for the most part of fellow- 
pup. is. their relatives and friends. 

The whole affair seemed like a big 
family gathering, older pupils who 
were n< i playing acting as ushers and 
adding to the enjoyment of the occa- 
sion. Visiting pupils came from 
Reading. Vt.. Reading, Medford, Wo- 
burn and Medford Hillside. 

Several of those who played are 
the possessors of unique records as 
pupils of Mrs. Lewis. Dorothy Har- 
rington of Medford Hillside studied 
for eight seasons without missing a 
le-son while Priscilla Frost Pease of 
Reading. Yt.. and Dorothy Collins of 
Medford played in 11! consecutive sum- 
mer recitals. Evelyn Snow Neilson of 
Reading and Freda Walker Wilcox of 
Woburn have been favorites at Lewis 
recitals for many seasons. 

Adding balance to the program 
were readings by Sylvia Parker ami 
violin and cello selections by Joseph- 
ine and Anna Smith, accompanied by 
Priscilla Richardson. Mrs. Lewis as- 
sisted her pupils in the presentation 
of several numbers and also spoke in 
hi r usual gracious manner. The so- 
cial, following the program, gave op- 
portunity for the renewal ot*former 
friendships and the exchange of hap- 
py memories of past associations. 

'Those who appeared upon the pro- 
gram were Margaret Corrigan, Evelyn 
Wheaton, Martha Goldstein, Norma 
Trout. Milton Heald, Doris M aid. Lo- 
I raine Hamm, Josephine Sm th, Anna 
' Smith. Priscilla Richardson, Dorothy 
Harrington, Sylvia Parker, Evelyn 
Snow Neilson, Priscilla Frost Pease, 
Dorothy Collins and Howard Collins. 



Kellcy & Hawes Co, 

funeral Directors 



LADY ASSISTANTS 



SERVICES RENDERED IN ANY PART OF STATE 
TELEPHONES: WINCHESTER 0035—4)174—0106 



Service, with us, means anticipating the needs and desires of 

our patrons so that they need not concern themselves about the 
slightest detail beyond telling us their wishes. 

su»6-tf 




I 
I 



SALE <H WICKER FURNITURE 

The Jordan Uakeiield Company, 
chairmakers for over 40 years, have 
announced a gigantic sale of uphol- 
stered wicker furniture at their fac- 
tory in tiie rear of :iss Main street, 
, Wakefield. The sale is now on and 
will continue until over $20,000 worth 
\ <d' sti ck is sold. Advantageous prices 
are offered on all kinds of pieces such 
j as living room suites, sun room 
i suites ami novelties in the latest 
' styles ami finishes. The furniture 
is of woven reed, stick reed and bur- 
nished rattan. 



540-542 MAIN STREET 



TEL. WIN. 2255 



WINCHESTER «.IULS 
W ATERTOWN 



BEAT 



DRAMATIC READING 



Watertown was defeated by the 
Winchester High School hockey team 
at Watertown Monday afternoon, 
2—0, Janet Nichols, fast left wing 
did all the scoring for the team. She 
played a very fine game carrying the 
ball down the field innumerable times. 
The Winchester goal-keepers had 
little chance to show what they could 
do. because of the cleverness of the 
Winchester defensive players in keep- 
ing the ball out of the danger zone. 

Tbi' summary: 
WINCHESTER W VTERTOWN 

C. Abbott, n» rw, T. Rosen 

W. William*, rw 

M. Kenilriok, rl ri. M. I'latt 

Poland, >'f cf. 1 Caruso 

Little, li li. H. Saxe 

Ntctmls, Hv lw. A. Taylor 

Tompkirm, rhb rhb, J. Nuaalnan 

Carloton, chb chb, H. Wallace 

Nichols, Ihb IM>. D. Howard 

Kirnt. rfb rfb, E. Rogers 

Thompson, rfb 

Sh»«. Ifli lfb. It. Clellan 

Eowle, it a. t'.. DiiKh 

Keepers, g 



M 
M 
J. 
M 
L. 
C. 
.1. 
.1. 
B. 
I.. 
11 



Miss Sylvia Parker presented a 
program of dramatic readings at the 
Unitarian Parish House on Wednes- 
day, Nov. 12 at 2:30 p. m. Her se- 
lections included two one-act plays, 
several monologues and dramatic 
poems, each one being presented with 
skill and a fine sense of its dramatic 
values. 

Mis.-. Parker has a delightful man- 
ner and gave her audience great 
pleasure. 

Mrs. George Hale Reed sang two 
groups of songs most delightfully. 
Tea was served at the close of the 
program. The Activities Committee 
of the Ladies' Friendly Society spon- 
sored the program, proceeds being 
for the benefit of the Parish House 
fund. 



be made as comfortable as tile grown 
up patients. 

Sun parlor windows afford plenty 
of sun and ventilation, while Venetian 
blinds lessen the glare. High-low 
electric lights give a brilliant or sub- 
dunl illumination as desired. 

An open air porch with awnings 
adjoins the ward ami makes possible 
and easy the obtaining of direct sun 
treatment for the children. A spec- 
ially equipped utility room services 
this unit, completing the equipment. 

The new ward is a delightful and 
airy apartment, gay with bright hang- 
ings, and tills a long felt need in the 
hospital. The directors and staff ap- 
preciate very much the benefit that 
the children who use the hospital will 
derive from the improvement. 



SHOW . 
YOUR * 
COLORS 




LADIES' FRIENDLY SOCIETY 



The Ladies' Friendly Society will 
meet Tuesday. Nov. IS in the Uni- 
tarian Parish House. The Executive 
Hoard meets at 1 ::!0 p. m. and at 2:311 
p. m. there will be a Neighborhood 
meeting to which members of Alli- 
ances about Winchester have been in- 
vited. 

Mrs. Frank S. Elliott, chairman of 



the General Alliance Social Service 
Committee, will speak on, "Our 



Vice-President John W. Smith of 
the Boston & Maine Railroad, whose 

home is on Sheffield road, has been \ Church and Social Service 
•cted a director of the Traffic Club 



if New England 



take the road that leads to-- 



"TURKEY 



99 



... and there you'll find THANKSGIVING 

\inl how much must In- done to get ready fur this 
days of days. We can't help you with the pies ami 
the puddings, but WE CAIN be a BIG help in seeing 
that your linen is all -pie anil span for every room 
in the house. 



Send everything that needs to be 
LAUNDERED or CLEANSED 
. . . and let us help you make 
Thanksgiving an assured success. 

— Our salesman will call — 



PHONE WINCHESTER 2100 



\cw England 
[ .nine 1 ! ics.|nc. 



Winchester Laundrv Division 



Converse Place, V, inchester 
LA I \DFRFRS CLEA\$1;RS 



DYERS 



Mrs. Juliet Tracy Shaw, soprano, 
will be the soloist for the afternoon. 

Members and guests will he served 
tea at the conclusion of the program. 



Wear a gorgeous, glowing 
"Mum" to the game and con- 
tribute your bit toward the 
success of your team. Besides 
— it's so exquisitely becoming 

WINCHESTER CONSERVATORIES 

INCORPORATED 

— Two Stores — 

.Main Store and (ireenhouses 

186 Cambridge Street 
Phones: Win. 1702, Win. 0609 

ARNOLD SHOP 



1 Common Street 



Phone Win. 0205 



i 



The Evening Branch of the Epiph- 
any Church will bold a Rummage 
Sale, Wednesday. Nov. Rl at 2 p. m. 
in the Parish House. 



i 



$ 



5 



Will put in an electrie floor piug 
in any room on the hrst floor of 
your house. 

E. C. SANDERSON 

THE ELECTRICIAN 
Tel. 0300 



For RHEUMATISM take 

BUXTON'S 

RHEUMATIC SPECIFIC 

You will not regret it. For ule at Hevey'a 
Pharmacy. Lrt oa tend you a booklet. Buxton 
Rheumatic Medicine Co.. Abbot Village. Me. 



j If You Like Good Things ! 

You'll Buy 
i I 

) A. A. MORRISON'S 

j FINE CANDIES 
j Home-Made Pastries 

| Made in Winchester 
j Fresh Every Day 

i 

Clara Catherine Candies 

A. A. Morrison 
19 MT. VERNON STREET 
TEL. WIN. 0966 




Lucille Perry Hall 

SCHOOL of DANCING 

Ballet — Tap — Musical Comedy — Ballroom 

Coaching <>/ Amateur Productions 
Dancers Available for Clubs and Entertainments 
Circular sent upon request 
Telephone: Kenmore 61 IS 
12 HUNTINGTON AVE. (Copley Sq.) HUSTON ^ 



HALL'S MARKET 



75-77 PLEASANT STREET 



MALDEN 



Importers of 



From Lunhan Bros., Cork, Ireland 

Distributors of 

S. S. PIERCE FANCY GROCERIES 
SWIFT'S GENUINE SPRING LAMB, GOLDEN WEST FOWL 
PREMIUM CHICKENS. HEAVY WESTERN BEEF, 
NATIVE PORK 

o24-tf 



YOU 



GOOD TENANTS 

PHONE 
0903 

AND GET 

FELLS 

to figure on your] 

PLUM8ING 



Many property owners in WINCHESTER know the cash 
value of being able to say "Fells" installed the plumbing." 



FELLS PLUMBING AND HEATING CO. 

656 MAIN STREET WINCHESTER, MASS. 



ANDERSON MOTOR CO. 

666 MAIN ST., WINCHESTER 
Tel. 1053—1054 

348 MASS. AVE., ARLINGTON 
Tel. 0767 

COME IN AND SEE OUR NEW 

PACKARD 6 CHRYSLER 

1931 MODELS 

NOW ON DISPLAY 

We give the highest market allowances for cars traded in. 

SEE US FIRST 

We Service All Makes of Cars 

WORK GUARANTEED— REASONABLE PRICES 

Automobile Accessories, Painting, Fender and Body Work, 
Day and Night Washing. 

Visit Our Used Car Department 

We Have All Makes of Cars at All Prices. 



PHARMACY FIRST 

KNIGHT 

WINCHESTER SQUARE WEST, AT CHURCH STREET 



3 



Thomas Quigley, Jr. 

CeaniHier, Contractor ana* Stone Matton 

Pi vim;. FLOORING, roof <('. 

Iri Ar'ificial Stone, AaPhftlt 
and All CnncreUr I'nxiucU 
•Mawilka, l>riv.«a»«, I urbin«, SUM Btc 
Floon for Cellar., Stable*. F»ct'.ri.-« 
■>nd WarehousKt 
Kalimatra I- urn iahetl 

1h LAKE ST B E FT 



ICE 

HORN POND ICE COMPANY 
Tel. Woburn 0310 



NOTARY PUBLIC 
JUSTICE OF THE PcACE 

T. PRIZE WILSON 



Star Office 



CHICHESTER S PILLS 

_-s. THE l»lAMONI» HHAM>. a. 
VatiV Aalt : hit |lranri*t ' r AA 

{ fl 4 M-.-S. ... i. , . IMu-m.ui.I Tlri.ii !//\A 

' rj>* nil. In 11.. 1 ai I Ut>l<l i c \V/ 

l»n«», Haled Blue Ribbon. V/ 
a^i wl Take no *>lher. Ituy or etmr 
-iff Ilrugal.t. Ask'.fl III < ll> -.-TFIiaj 

. (, iiiMiMMi iiinvii . ii.im t as 

I V B ye»^'.l(tlo•*nssllc^t,Sale^t.Al^MysHel 1 ^ , 1c ! 

^—-r SOLD BY DKlQfilSTS EVERVWHt-KF 

i.K-lyr : 



Phone ITfifi Katnbli»h«l 18»1 

R. E. 3EL1VEAU 

I'ornifrfv A. K. BergatriHIl 
UPHOI.HTKUINfi AMt FURNITURE 
ni l- VIKING 
Cuahion, Maltreat and Shade Work 
Keflniahinf 
Drrorative Chain Made i» Order 
Id Thempaon St Winchester, Vhss. 



Good's 
Riding School 

Harry Goutl. Proi 

Well Broken Horses 

and Ponies 
Personal Supervision 

MAIN STREET MEDFORD 
'Near Oak Grova Cemetarr " 
Tel. Mystic 3802 



E. W. NICHOLSON 

PLUMBING AM) HEATING 

We're equipped to handle any 
kind of a plumbing job, bit; >r 
small, the public has to offer. 
We do our work well anil we do 
it in jig time, too. -No waiting 
around for inspiration. We will 
do your repair work in a hurry 
and you'll he perfectly willing 
to meet the sort of a bill we'll 
hand you. 

118 WINN STREET, WOBURN 
Tel. Woburn 0899 




(iivo your mother 1 , 
friend "r «wwt- 
heart n n:uHrji.n- 
teed, iweet muk- 
iiiir canary bird. 
We have Hurt/. 
Mountain singers, 
$7 .Do. genuine se- 
lected St. Andreaa- 
burg with long silvery trills and grand 
variations, day and night ftongstera, $9.00. 
Also rams of all descriptions, cat, dog and 
bird supplies, «"t«'. 

CHAS. LUDLAM 

69 Rromfleld St. and :» Boiworth St. 
Tel. LlBerty 9.189 lloeton 
Established Ists 

o!0-13t 



COKE 

$12.00 PER TON 

Stove, Nut and Egg sizes. 
Extra charge for smaller 
quantities. AH orders cash. 

FRIZZELL BROS. 

Tel. Woburn 0570 
6 Greenwood Avenue 




FIRST 
MOIKT4. A4. KS 

We have fund* avail- 
able for liberal fir8t 
mortgages on owners' 
homes ... If you are 
planning to buy, build 
or re-fiuance — write 
for application blank 
or call at office. 

LAWYERS TITLE 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

Baatam Fit* ( enta flaring* 
Bank BaaUdlac 

94 School Street, Boston 

ii Liberty »S»» « 

01441 



On Direct Examination 

THE WITNESS TESTIFIED 



As Follows: 



1. Name? Age? Roc McDanolds. 26 \cars. 

2. Address? North Haverhill, N. H. 

3. Occupation? Dairy Farmer. 

4. How man) acres of L<nd? 240. 

5. . ire ill! the i ~ot* s in • l nu, In rd tuberculin tistu!? Yes. 

6. How much milk produced daily? 530 lbs. 

7. How many cows < ><. in your milking herd? 16. 

8. Who dots the milkiug? My mother and myself. 

9. What time does milking begin in the morning? 5 : 3< > A. M. 

10. How ere thi cow. cleaned? Brushed carefully daily and udders and flanks 
cleaned before each milking. 

: l. Whet i. :t: id for l idding on the floor of the cow stable? Clean shavings. 

12. Is your stable whitewashed? Hon do you do it? Yes; with a whitewash 

sprayer. 

1 3. What kind r,f milk pails do ;on ust ? Covered pails. 

14. Do you wash your bauds befort ton milk? Vis. 

15. II hat kind of a strainer do yon use? Sterile pad sanitary strainer; and a new 

sterile pad is used each milking. 

16. II hat is the oh jut r,f cooling milk? Presenting the growth of bacteria, 
l". How is )'///;• milk cooled? In an ice water tank. 

18. What makes milk go sour? bacteria. 

19. Who washes the milking pails? My wife. 

20. Are they scalded? Yes. 

21. Why not rinse them in cold water instead of scalding water? Cold water 

would have little or no value in final cleaning of pails. 

22. What docs the scalding water do to them? Sterilizes the pails. 

23. Where do you take the milk? To the separate milk house 40 feet from the barn. 

24. What docs the man who received your milk at the Hood station do with the 

milk? He inspects and weighs it. 

25. Does he take any samples? Yes. 

26. What does he take samples for? Bacteria, butterfat, and sediment. 

27. M hat docs he do with the jugs or cans after they are emptied? Places them 

into a washer. 

28. Are they hot when you get them back? Yes, very hot. 

29. In your opinion are they clean? Dry? Clean and practically dry. 




Mr. Roe McDanolds is a representative Hood Grade "A" Milk producer. He tells the 
story of Grade "A" production clearly and effectively. Our production manager gives 
him a rating of 99 per cent on this testimony. With men of this type making Hood's 
Grade "A" Milk you have one reason it has reached its tremendous popular favor. 



30. Where do you keep the pails and cans after they are washed? On a rack in 

the sunshine. 

31. Do you receive any reports of laboratory tests for bacteria? Yes. 

32. How low are your tests? My lowest count this year is 300. 

33. Why does the company test your milk for bacteria? To determine its 

cleanliness. 

34. What is the Grade A Bonus? A cash premium paid by the Hood Company for 

extra clean milk that complies with the Hood standard for Grade A Milk. 




VOIR B A B V 

r/esP/ v es /// e. /jest 



HOOD'S 

GRADE A MILK 

From Tuberculin Tested Cows * * < Delivered fresh 7 days a week 

H. P. HOOD & SONS, Dairy Experts 

West Medford, Mass. Telephone Mystic 0710 

fune in "H. P. Hood Modern Concert"— Thursdays— W.E.E.I.— 9.30 P. M. 



SEVERAL MOTOR ACCIDENTS 
OVER WEEK END 



Fire Truck Collided With Sedan at Ba- 
con and Church Streets 



The most serious of several motor 
accidents reported over the past week- 
end took place shortly before 5 o'clock 
last Sunday afternoon when Engine 3, 
on the way to a fire in the hill district, 
collided with a Chandler sedan at the 
junction of Church and Bacon streets. 

Engine ■'? was answering an alarm 
from Box 144, which had been sounded 
for an inconsequential grass fire at the 
corner of Ridge street and Dunster 
lane. As the fire truck approach the 
junction of Bacon and Church streets 
the Chandler sedan, which is owned by 
Mrs. Emily N. Latremore of 11 Law- 
rence street and which was being driv- 
en by Mrs. Latremore at the time of 
the accident, came out of Bacon street 
to cross Church street and enter 
Fletcher street. Driver J. Edward 
Noonan of the fire truck was unable 
to avoid the sedan which was damaged 
as a result of the collision, and had to 
be towed to the Central Garage. Only 
the bumper of Engine 3 was broken 
n the smash. 

Mrs. Latremore was injured in the 



collision and removed to the Winches- 
ter Hospital by Patrolmen John J. Re- 
gan and John H. Noonan of the Police 
Department and Fireman Alexander: 
W. Mackenzie of the Fire Department. 
She was treated by Dr. Milton J. I 
Quinn for injuries to her head, face 
and neck, and detained at the hospital 
over night. Driver Noonan was sus- 
pended by Chief David H. DeCourcy of 
the Fire Department, pending the re- ' 
suit of the hearing to be held in con- 
nection with the accident. 

While traffic was still more or less 
congested as the result of the above 
accident, at r>:40 p. m., two Ford se- 1 
dans, one driven by Romolo Ferrari of 
198 Holland street. West Somerville, 
and the other operated by Florence M. I 
Wild of 28 Badger road, Medford, were ' 
in collision at the junction of Fletch- ; 
or and Church streets. Mr. Ferrari's 
ear was leaving Fletcher street to 
cross Church street into Bacon street ; 
while Mrs. Wild was headed north 
on Bacon street to enter Church street. 
Both cars were damaged and Theresa j 
Ferrari, who was a passenger in the 
Ferrari car, complained of injuries to 
her head which was bumped against 
the windshield by the impact of the 
collision. 



The first of the week-end accidents I 
occurred last Friday when a Ford j 
seda, driven by Robert R. Persons of I 
37 Orange street, Woburn, and a 
Chevrolet coupe, operated by Leonidas 
E. Sophios of 11A High street, Med- ! 
ford, were in collision on Main street 
at the traffic beacon in the square. 1 
The machines were only slightly dam- 
aged and no one was injured. 

Shortly after 7 o'clock Saturday 
evening a Chrvsler sedan, driven by 
Lillian A. M. Anderson of 569 Wash- ! 
ington street, while headed south on 
Washington street, collided with a j 
Ford coupe, parked on Washington I 
street at the corner of Swanton street 
and the property of Harry G. Kemp- 
ton of 46 Forest street. Both cars 
were damaged, but no injuries were j 
reported. 

At 4:20 Sunday morning Fred Da- 
vis a driver in the employ of H. P. 
Hood & Sons, had a narrow escape 
from serious injury when the milk 
wagon he was driving south on Main 
street was struck by an automobile 
at the junction of Main street and 
Mystic Valley Parkway. The driver 
of the machine did not stop. The 
shaft of the wagon was broken and 
the windshield of the car was smashed. 



Mr. Davis and the horse escaped in- 
jury. 

A Ford sedan, driven by Walter J. 
Love of 242 Ocean avenue. New Lon- 
don, Conn., while going north on Main 
street at 2:20 last Sunday afternoon 
was in collision at the railroad cross- 
ing in the center with a second Ford 
sedan, also going north and driven by- 
Francis A. Sullivan of 26 Marian 
street, Charlestown. Sullivan claimed 
that his father, who was riding with 
him. was injured as a result of the 
collision. 



LAUNDRY EMPLOYEES HEAR 
NATIONALLY KNOWN 
SPEAKER 



There is a certain fascination about 
the laundry business, as evidenced in 
organizations such as the Winchester 
Laundries, where there are a number 
of workers who have been in the em- 
ploy of the company for over 25 years. 
Anything concerning the laundry in- 
dustry is of interest to them. 

At a special meeting held at their 
plant in Winchester this week, the 
Sales and Service Personnel had the 
pleasure of listening to one of the 
industry's best known speakers, Mrs. 



May Laing Grady, perhaps better 
known nationally as Mrs. Martha 

j Lang. In the past months the name 
of Mrs. Martha I^ang has appeared in 
the magazines all over the country in 

[connection with her work as Consul- 
tant on Approved Methods at the 
American Institute of Laundering at 
Joliet, 111. The Institute is known as 
the million dollar proving plant of the 
laundry industry and is also the home 
of the national association. 

Mrs. Grady was one of the principal 
sneaker at the Massachusetts conven- 
tion held last week at the Copley Pla- 
za, and those who listened to her mes- 
sage to the laundryowners of New 
England found her a most delightful 
personality. In her talk she paid high- 
est tribute to the homemakers of to- 
day, and stressed the importance of 
modern and improved methods, cour- 
teous attention and prompt service. 

Arrangement for the special talk 
at the Winchester plant of the New 
England Laundries, were made through 
Mr. A. T. Downer, president of the 
company, who is also vice-president 
of the American Institute of Launder- 
ing at Joliet. 



4 



I HE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER U. 1930 



MISS AVERY'S CURRENT 
EVENTS' LECTURES 



MOTLEY CLUB DEFEATED 
WINCHESTER 



The first of the 1930-31 series of 
Miss Avery's lectures was held at the 
Wyman School hall on Wednesday, 
Oct. 2'J. The Smith College Club of 
Winchester sponsors the lectures for 
the benefit of the Scholarship fund 
which gives annual aid of $400 to a 
Winchester tfirl attending Smith 
College. Mrs. Henry K. Spencer, 
president of the Club, presented Miss 
Avery to an enthusiastic group which 
has grown steadily in size through 
the eight seasons of her lecturing in 
Winchester, and practically fills the 
Wyntan School hall. 

Miss Avery visited especially Eng- 
land, Germany, Russia, Fiance and 
Poland during the spring and sum- 
mer, lecturing four times in England, 
ance to undergraduate students of 
Oxford College, and to each of these 
audiences she has been invited to lec- 
ture again next year. 

She found that the chtef problems 
of these countries are identical, the 
two horns of the dilemma are every- 
where haunting— war and jobs. 

And upon returning to the United 
States she found the three chief top- 
ics of conversation to be still the l*th 
amendment, the drug problem and 
t hi- young generation! 

Here, where in New \ oi k I lty 
alone there are more Jews, more 
Iri l>. more Italian- and more colored 
than in any one city in the world, 
where the incoming racial strains are 
often inherently lawless and non- 
conforming, we are gradually gam- 
in" a national cohesian through the 
undi i landing of our i imon prob- 
lem an d a common industrial out- 
look In spite oT our racial and geo- 
graphic diversities we are being knit 
into a national code. 

fcmong the handicaps ol under- 
standing between England and Amer- 
ica i- th< fad that England speaks 
English and America -peak.- Amen- 
can. 

Every nation in made up of two in- 
hered parts, those who are saucer- 
r, mined in their outlook and those oi 
larger per pectivc. Towards Ameri- 
ca the feeling in England is better 
than al any time since the war and 
definitely better than two years ago. 

This opinion cami from both soles in 

''"Quoting m Viscount Chelmwood 
and other the opinion expressed was 
that war in five to -even years is un- 
thinkable. The feeling among the 
little powers is very much better, 
their small differences have been ad- 
justed with enough fairness to make 
them permanent. The feeling be- 
tween England and France is not so 
kindlv and there is no surety of the 
situation on the Continent with this 
feeling Germany is taking advan- 
tag( of this and is tending to pull 
away. But between France and Italy 
the '-tram is the greatest. 

NY war was ever bom of a given 
incident. War is born of a decade ol 
events and feeling. In the last ten 
years it was said m England, Eigh- 
teen times we might have gone to 
war and didn't!" 

Europe is anxious to know wnat 
we mighl do in case of war on the 
point of freedom of the seas. In join- 
ing the Pact of Paris we say "No na- 
tion has any right to use war as a 
means to an end." The nations are 
asking if wc would be willing to 
sav or to imply that we would not 
trade With the nation who started 
war in Europe. 

Miss Avery's remedy for war is 
for one day at a time for a decade, 
keeping the national temper and 
sense of justice, and keeping national 
self control. 

Germany is worried about the Em- 
pire dollars which are being paid on 
reparations and the national debt. It 
is a significant sign that business 
men are supplanting politicians in 
German affairs. 

The psychological tension is very 
great in Germany. Communism and 
Fascism are on the right and the left 
the same. Men in the factories are 
producing less than a year ago. Mus- 
solini is making a definite bid for 
German support and the Fascist par- 
ty is training there. 

An anecdote of Miss Avery's land- 
ing at Plymouth was the appearance 
of the officials of the town, the Mayor 
bearing the keys and the vice-Mayor 
with chains and with several others 
all clad in robes of crimson and pur- 
ple, bearing a manuscript. From 
this the Mayor read an address of 
welcome to the Hamilton Choir of 
Hampton Institute, Va.. recalling the 
journey of Sir Walter Raleigh and a 
large group to Virginia. The leader 
of the colored choir expressed the 
gratitude of the choir for the honor 
paid them, for the pleasure of the 
reception and for the link between 
England and America, between Ply- 
mouth and Virginia. 

A recent book on Russia which is 
strongly recommended is "Ten Years 
of Soviet Russia. A living history 
and a record" by William H. Cham- 
ber! in. 

In closing she spoke of the Rotary 
Club, horn in Chicago in 1905 and 
now grown to 3000 clubs in 50 dif- 
ferent nations. The slogan is "He 
profiteth most who serveth best." 



The strong Motley Club eleven won 
a Boston Association field hockey 
match from the Winchester girls A. 
A. Armistice Day forenoon on Man- 
chester Field, 3 — I. 

Motley brought an experienced 
team to Winchester and included such 
athletic stars in its lineup as Rena 
McDonald, women's champion shot- 
putter and javelin thrower; Olive 
Hasenfus, Olympic sprinter and 
swim star and Mae Magill, Olympic 
weight thrower and swimmer. The 
visitors attack was built around 
sturdy Rena McDonald, who is fast, 
a good stick handler and who pos- 
sesses a wicked shot. Motley's de- 
fense was too good for Winchester, 
the Misses Magill and Phillips per- 
mittint: few shots to get as far as 
the goal uprights. 

Winchester did not field its strong- 
est eleven, being without the serv- 
ices of Virginia and Marie Merrill 
and "Hetty" Hendrick, who were at- 
tending college classes. The locals' 
played a good game against their 
more experienced opponents, and at 
full strength would have made 
things interesting for the Motley 
Club. 

"Puggy" Mercer was Winchester's 
star, and especially during the first 
half, made several spectacular saves, 
one a hard driven angle shot from 
the stick of Rena McDonald which 
was a gem. "Puggy" was prevented 
from stopping the third of the Mot- 
ley goals because of the muddy con- 
dition of the ground between the 
sticks. The shot was a soft one. but 
the former high school goaler just 
couldn't cross over fast enough to 
make the save. 

"Dot" MacKenzie and ('apt. "Lou" 
Skilling were Winchester's most 
consistent offensive threats and the 
former made several nice carries up 
the field. Twice Winchester might 
have scored on passes in from Mac- 
Kenzie and "Kay" Carlisle, but the 
passes were not covered and the Mot- 
lev fullback- quickly brushed the ball 
out of danger. 

The sole sci re of the first half 
came shortly before tie whistle, a 
high angle shot from Rena McDon- 
ald's stick. Mercer partially blocked 
the ball, which struck the upright 
and obligingly dropped in. 

The big Motley center forward al- 
so scored the second goal of the game, 
a hard shot from scrimmage which 
the Winchester goaler just failed to 
kick aside. Midway through the' half 
Olive Hasenfus carried from midtield 
to the striking circle and shot into a 
fierce scrimmage. From the flying 
mass of sticks Motley's right inner, 
Bushnell, shot an easy one past Mer- 
cer who was unable to shift to meet 



the ball because of the slippery foot- 
ing. 

Winchester kept fighting and two 
minutes before the final whistle, 
"Dot" MacKenzie rushed to the 
striking circle and shot. The Mot- 
ley fullback thrust aside the ball, 
but "Lou" Skilling came up very fast 
and caged the rebound. Elsie Mor- 
row played well on defense for Win- 
chester." The summary: 
MOTLEY WINCHESTER 

HwenfiM, rw rw, MaeKentie 

Bushnell. ri ...ri. Skiltinir Ic) 

McDonald, ef <r. VaUeJy 

Kalj.h. li I>. Cullen 

Holt, li 

Boynton, <ci, Iw Iw, Carlisle 

Denen. rhb rhb. Newman 

Golden, crib chb. Morrow 

Smith, lhb l"t). Bond 

Magill, rfb rfb, IVIan 

Phillips. Ifb Ifb, Cutter 

Leahy, it k. Mercer 

Scire Motley IS : Winchester 1. Goals 
McDonald 2, Hmhnell. Skilling. Referees 
Whitehead ami Kelley. Timers Goodman and 
I, MacKenxie. Tii.>. min. inrnwi^. 



HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS 
DANCED 



WIN' CHESTER GIRLS AND MEL- 
ROSE IN SCORELESS TIE 



Winchester High School girls' field 
hockey team maintained its place at 
the top of the northern division of 
the Interscholastic League as the re- 
sult of its scoreless tie with the Mel- 
rose girls' eleven on Manchester 
Fic hi last Friday afternoon. 

The locals failed to show the form 
of previous games and were slow to 
take advantage of several scoring op- 
portunities which presented them- 
selves during the first half. Only 
Capt. Caroline Nichols and Mabel 
Tompkins were hustling for the ball. 

Melrose on the other hand put up 
a stubborn fight, and hustled all the 
time. Winchester was without the 
services of Olive Boutilller, regular 
center forward, who has left the 
squad. 

Between the halves of the varsity 
game the Winchester seconds won 
a 2—0 victory from the Melrose jay- 
vees, Edna Hanlon, left wing, scor- 
ing both goals after pretty carries 
up the field. 



The A. A. dance given by the mem- 
bers of the Athletic Association at 
the High School last Saturday even- 
ing proved to be a huge success. The 
gymnasium was decorated very ap- 
propriatedely and picturesquely. The 
patrons. Principal Wade 1.. Grindle 
and Mr. and Mrs. Wendell Mansfield, 
were seated in one corner of the gym 
surrounded by a white picket fence. 
Around the wall were corn stalks and 
pumpkins. Entwined streamers of 
many colors were used to hide the 
ceiling and made a pretty effect over 
the dancers. The orchestra of George 
Varney was exceptionally good and 
many pronounced it t<> be one of the 
best ever heard in Winchester. 

The committee in charge of the 
dance comprised Janet Nichols, chair- 
man; Mabel Tompkins. Olive Bou- 
tillier, Paul Welburn. William Stalk- 
er, Charles Main. 



Your Heating System can be 
Modernized for a Very 



If you are not getting complete heating satisfaction 
from your present equipment, our engineer will call at 
your convenience, make the necessary recommendations 
and furnish estimate of cost at no expense to you. 

HIDEOUT, CHANDLER & JOYCE 

1 30 BROAD STREET BOSTON, MASS. 

Tel. Hancock 6383-6384 



The summarv 
game follows: 
WINCHESTER 



of 



Nichels 

Little, li 

Poland, cf. . . 
Kenclrick, ri 
Williams, rw 
Abbott, rw 
Nichols, 1 
Carli ten. 
Tompkins, 

Shaw, HI' 

Kim.', rfb. ■ • . 
Thompson, rfb 

Keepers, g . . . 



the first team 

MELROSE 
li. Miller 
I). Gilley 
K. Fillmoru 
li. E. Smith 
I.I 



. . . rw. 



. .Iw. 



ib. . . 
■lib . 
rhb. 



V. McDoni 
E. Reard 



L. 
M. 
II. 
.1. 

k 

1 1.. i 

Referees Bennett 
keepers Orpin and 
periods. 



rhh, 

chb, A. Colbert 

lhb, E, Johnson 

rfb. .1. Ward 

Ifb, S. Tibbetts 

v, V.. Davidaon 

and Townsend. Time- 
Houser. Time 1"> min. 



Mr. and Mrs. Frank II. Knight of 
Hidgeway spent the week-end and 
holiday in Portland, Me. 



Dei 



ONE NAME 



Delco 



ONE QUALITY 



NO BATTERY — regardless of price, or make, will serve 
you better. 

NO BATTERY — costing less will serve you as well. 

FOR SERVICE, RECHARGING AND STORAGE 
ON ALL MAKES CALL 

Oscar Hedtler 

26 Church Street, Winchester Tel. 1208 



C. f). OF A. NOTES 

The next meeting of Santa Maria 
Court. 150, ('. D. of A. will be held 
on Monday evening. Nov. IT in Ly- 
ceum Hall. The date has been changed 
from Thursday, Nov. 2o, because of 
the F.Iks' Ball to be held on that night. 
Lecturer Catherine Rowen has ar- 
ranged a delightful program for the 
Nov. 17 meeting, which is to be a 
social, the entertainment provided en- 
t :ri ly by children. 

Flans are already under way for 
an o'd timers' night on Thursdav. 
Dec. IS in aid of the charitable com- 
mittee of the Court. There will be 
dancing and entertainment, modern 
ami old-fashioned. Mrs. Hannah 
Stygles, chairman, announces that no 
one under 25 will be admitted with- 
out guardian or escort and anyone 
over 70 will be admitted free. 



Miss Eleanor Ives is to be an ush- 
er at the Lawrence Tibbett song re- 
cital, to be held Nov. '1\ in th.> Hotel 
Statler ballroom under the auspices 
of the Boston Home and Social Visi- 
tors' Association. 



Tk\n^Sfmnserthan9&ti0tt! 

t ome in and ask for PROOF of every statement in this advertisement 

The second taliesfc- 
IT mountain in the 
K Wm world is onlu 2000 
feet above *ea level 




i\ Chicago vroxnaiC 
^a.ve a. conductor 
x ttatisf er 36yeaxs old 




Iceland is famous 
for its hot sprmqs 

YEARS AGO the kitchen sink was rarely thought of. as far as a 
thmjr <»f beauty »as concerned —In the up-to-date home, it is the 
outstanding lixture in the kitchen. 

P T. FOLEY 6c <*0. 

PLUMBING- AND M EATI NO CONTRACTORS 

^/// #o66//7g promp/ft/ (?/fc/7cfcrf fo 

599 MAIN STf^EET WINCHESTER. MASS- 

SHOP — Tel. Win. 14«>2 RES. — Tel. Win. 1726 



0^ 




Our Modern, Completely Equipped Funeral Home and Chapel 

KELLEY &r HAWES CO. 

jFunCtal SMieCtOVS Lady Assistants 
Service Available Anywhere in Xew England PHONES: WINCHESTER 0035. 0174, 0106 




To Women who 

do their own Housework 



Ha 



S your telephone bell rung this morning? 

// so, may we ask how far away from it you were? Whether 
at work in the kitchen? Or making beds? Or sweeping, dusting, 
or doing any of the numerous chores that come under the head 
of "Housekeeping?" 

We are not asking out of idle curiosity. Wc, as Service 
Representatives, are assigned a definite number of cus- 
tomers. They are our clients, so to speak. !t is our duty 
to see that they are well served in every respect. 

We know that a great many women do their own housework, 
and are proud to do it, because housekeeping is a business in itself. 
They're interested in what science has done to relieve that 
business of its tedium or drudgery, and likewise in antrum,' that 
sat es their time or energy- 

Now, when we suggest the saving of time and steps that a 
second telephone in your home would bring about, please 
do not jump to the conclusion that we mean another 
telephone line. We mean just another instrument, conneeteJ 
to your present line, but located perhaps in the kitchen or 
the bedroom. Then you could answer calls from either 
telephone and make them, too. It practically doubles the 
value of the service at only a small fraction of the first cost. 

We would be glad to have you call us and let us teil you how 
an extension telephone could be adapted to your particular needs. 

Mrs. Jessie C. McLeod Miss Edna V. Babcock 

Winchester Service Representative: Winchester Serine Representative 

lor Numt-eri 0001 to I -j<w Number! IIO0 la JJjO 

WincKcstCT Biuineis Office : 17 Ttampscm Street 



New England Telephone and Telegraph Company 



5 



.t-~.. — n — ! — ™ — — 

„ „ i — — . 



r 



'■ — — — ' ■ ■ 

m — - — [ [%huUL*iii M 



Holiday Season 



I! \ 

f ■-' 



Clark Jewel Mange Sale 



II: 



$10 
Allowance 
for your 
Old Range 



Many Colors and 
Models to Choose 
from 




$10 
first payment 

Balance in 17 
equal monthly 
payments 



I 



All ranges equipped with 
Loraine Oven Heat Con- 
I trol and Insulated Oven 



Arlington Gas Light Co. 

Tel. Win. 0142 527 Main Street, Winchester 



, illlikl 



3 

I 

I 



WINCHESTER PUBLIC LIBRARY BOWDOIN SQUARE THEATRE 



From Nov. 10-29 there will tic an 
exhibition of photographs loaned by 
the Library Ait Club on "St. Francis 
of Assisi" after water-colors by 
Pedro Subereaseaux Errazuriz, n't' 
Chili. 

St. Francis of Assisi, a famous 
Italian monk ami preacher, was born 
in lis:; and died Oct. 4, L226. In his 
youth he was rich ami conspicuous 
fur prodigality, but a severe illness 
turned his thoughts to religion, and 
he devoted himself henceforth to a 
life of aseetie devotion, founding in 
1210 the oriler of the Franciscans. 

His blameless, gentle life has been 
peculiarly adapted to illustration, and 
a visit to Assisi by Subereaseaux 
awakened a strong desire to give pic- 
torial expression to the feelings 
these legends aroused in him. 



Another Winchester boy jumped in- 
to the semi-pro football ranks last 
week-end when Roger "Ty" Sherman. 
ex-Norwich quarterback and captain, 
appearetl in the lineup of the Mill- 
streams. "Ty" was one of tht best 
backs to play at Norwich in recent 
years and was the first of three Win- 
chester boys to lead the Cadets in 
successive vears on the gridiron. 



At the Bowdoin Square Theatre 
beginning Sunday for the first halt' of 
the week the management offers a 
most enjoyable talking picture bill and 
vaudeville of the selected type. That 
thrilling talking hit, "The Sea Wolf" 
from the pen of ".lack" London will 
introduce in the cast such well known 
screen stars as Milton Sills. Jane 
Keith and Raymond Hackett. Anoth- 
er top-line feature will present, 
"Those Three French Girls" a story 
of Parisian life where three flappers 
take a party of ex-doughboys for a 
ride. It is well supplied with whole- 
some comedy and the cast will intro- 
duce, Fifi Dorsay, Reginald Denny. 
Cliff Edwards and others of screen 
value. Other features will make up 
the bill and on Wednesday night 
cabaret features are offered in addi- 
tion to the regular show. On Thurs- 
day the entire program is changed 
including vaudeville and high grade 
pictures. 

Mrs. Holbrook Ayer of Oxford 
street and son. Holbrook Aver. Jr., left 
Winchester last week to spend the 
w'nter at Coral Gables in Florida. 
Holbrook, Jr. is to attend the Coral 
' Cables elementary schools during his 
sojourn in the south. 



SALVATION ARMY ANNUAL 
DRIVE IN WINCHESTER 
ASKS FOR $2000 



Imagine your embarrassment 

WHEN YOU SPEK1D lO MIKJUTES" 
SPEAKING- TO THE WAITER. IN COR-— 
RESPOMDENCE. SCHOOL FRE>JCH AMD HE 
ANSWERS YOU INI 
PERFECT 
ENGLISH 





IMAGINE YOUR SATISFACTION— to know that Fur Trimmed 
Coats and Garments can be cleaned without removing the Fur 
Trimmings. These fur trimmings are usually fitted to the gar- 
ments by experienced hands and should not be removed, and it is 
not at all necessary to remove them when a PROPER CLEANSING 
PROCESS is used. 

Mter a thorough cleaning of Fur Trimmed Coats and Garments 
we carefully rehnish them and also REFINISH THE FUR so that 
it takes on its soft, lustrous, new appearance. 

Careful thought should be given to whom you intrust Fur Trimmed 
Garments and Coats as many of them are quite expensive to buy. 
We are particularly well equipped for this kind of work and we 
invite comparison of our work with others. 

E & R CLEANSING and DYEING COMPANY 

SMART ST. at 209 MASS. AVE. 
TELEPHONES UNIVERSITY 4170-4171-4172 
CAMBRIDGE. MASS. 

INCORPORATED 190S 



The annual Salvation Army drive 
for the Winchester district tor $200(1 
has now begun. Lt.-Col. Paul 1!. 
Moulton, the local chairman. Charles 
K. Barrett, the local treasurer, of the 
Winchester Trust Co., together with 
the campaign organizer, Leland H. 
Cady and his committee have the 
campaign well underway now. 

The need is even greater this year 
than ever, on account of the unem- 
ployment situation, so everyone is 
urged to contribute as generous as 

j pi ssihle. Send your contribution to 
Charles E. Barrett at the Winchester 

. Trust Company or hand it to a Sal- 
vation Army solicitor when he calls 
as the solicitor will have proper 

| credentials signed by Mr. Moulton, 
the local chairman. 

The chairman and treasurer and 
committee of the Winchester district 
made the following statement today: 
The Salvation Army stands ready 
at all times to feed the hungry, to 
clothe the naked, to give succor to 
those suffering from either mental 
or physical distress, in other words, 
to rentier the most vital service at the j 
most crucial periods. 

If all who are employed, who have 
steady incomes, will aid even more 
generously this year than in the past j 

• the Army' can carry on its humatarian 
work unimpaired. I 

Help the Salvation Army to help 
others. We all know the good work 
of the Army, so let us all help theni 
carry it sti'll on further. 



lean Legion; Principal of Winchester High 
School. 

25. John F. Donaghey, Exalted Ruler <>f 
Elks. 

-ti. Rev. William S. Packer, editorial and 
literary writer of Boston Globe stair; assis- 
tant at Episcopal Church. 

Judge Curtis W. Nash, Judge of 4th 
Judicial Court. 



ADRIANOPLE: CITY OF TUR- 
KEY'S WEST 



The destructive wind which re- 
cently left Adrianople's windows 
without glass, leveled building and 
toppled lofty minarets, adds anoth- 
er, if minor, disaster to the history 



of the venerabl 



e city, 



ays 



bulk 



Salvation Army Committee for 
Winchester 

1 Lleut.-Col. Paul B. Moulton, chairman 
.if Drive, retired V. S. Army: member of 
National Geographical Society. 

Charles K. Barrett, Treasurer nf drive; 
treasurer of Winchester Trust Company. 

:t. William 11. Ki'Kirs. Chief of Police 
Department. 

4. Mabel W. Stinson, Town Clerk 

5. T. Price Wilson, Manager and Publisher 
of Winchester Star. 

fi Rev. John E. Whitley. Second Congre- 
gational Church. 

7. Rev. George H. Rood. Unitarian Church. 

8. Rev. Truman Heminway. Church of the 
Epiphany, Kpiscopal. 

9. George F. Arnold, florist and president 
of Chamber of Commerce. 

10. Creorge H. Lochman. Postmaster. 

11. David H. DeCourcy, Chief of Fire 
Department. 

12. Mrs. Christine E. Hay den, president of 
Fortnightly Club. 

13. Harry C. Sanborn, president of Sav- 
ings Hank and office manager. 

14. Rev. Benjamin P. Browne. First Bap- 
tist Church. 

l.">. Rev. J. West Thompson, Crawford Me- 
morial M. E. Church. 

15. Miss Hilda M. Torrop. Superintendent 
of Winchester Hospital. 

IT. Lewis Parkhurst. Treasurer of Ginn 
Publishing Company. 

is. H. M. Hell, manager of Winchester 
Laundries, Inc. 

19. Judge Charles N. Harris, Judge of 
Pn-hate Court. Middlesex County. 

20. Howard F Lunt, Superintendent of 
International Agricultural Corporation. 

21. Joseph W. Worthen, attorney-at-law. 
ex-chairman of Hoard of Selectmen. 

22. Dr. Arthur I.. Brown, vice-president of 
N. E. Physical Theraphy Association : past 
president of Amerioan Physical Theraphy 
Association. 

23. Vincent P. Clarke, Selectman ; lawyer, 
past chairman of drive. 

24. Wade L. Grindle. Commander of Amer- 



tin from the Washington, D, C. head- 
quarters of the National Geographic 
Society. 

Since Hadrian rebuilt the city in 
the second century, Adrianople has 
risen to envious heights among 
Turkish cities in commercial impor- 
tance. It also has been engulfed in 
periods of distress. 

A City of the East 

The city lies on the banks of the 
Maritsa and Tunja Rivers, 137 
miles northwest of Constantinople 
on the railroad which connects the 
famous old Turkish capital with Bel- 
grade, Sotia and Salonika. Com- 
merce that passed between the 
Balkans and other portions of Eu- 
rope, and Turkey, made Adrianople 
a great market and distributing 
point. Tariff barriers set up by the 
Balkan states and emigration of the 
city's population — the Turks east- I 
ward and the Greeks westward — 
have been charged with the more re- 
cent depression of the city's commer- 
cial importance. 

If visitors to Adrianople were un- 
aware of its location on the map, a ! 
tour of the city would lead them to j 
believe that they were east of the 
Bosporus, for a marked Oriental at- \ 
mosphere prevails. Caravans ar- 
rive as they do in Damascus; dusty, 
ruddy-skinned camel men mingle 
with the street crowds, peering into 
windows where a colorful array of 
Oriental carpets, shawls, bric-a-brac 
and other eastern merchandise pre- 
dominates; lofty cypress trees poke 
their uppermost limbs above the con- 
glomeration of red roofs, and mosque 
domes dominate the irregular sky- 
line much as they do in Brusa. while 
muezzins call the faithful Moslems 
to prayer from tall white minarets 
which point fingerlike to the sky. 
Commercial Glamor Gone 

As one peers into Adrianople 
shops, guides decry the fact that 
their city is not what it once was. 
Before the World War. they will tell 
the visitor. Adrianople shops dis- 
played handsome pieces of Austrian 
, crockery, artistic German iron pieces 
fancy French jewelry, and English 
textiles. And during a shopping 
tour, the tones of an American pho- 
I nograph competed with the loud 
; bickering of shop keepers and pur- 
chasers, and the boistrous calls of 
street vendors. 

Although the city now is quieter, its 
i population has diminished, from 
186,000 to 56.000 since 1905, and 



things Turkish appear to be moving 
eastward, Adrianople continues to 
hang on to a certain commercial pres- 
tige. Raw silk from near-by nuil- 
berry tree plantations, cotton, opium, 
rosewater, attar of roses, wax, and 
Turkey red dye are exported, and the 
city still has a pride in tine wines 
produced from grapes from neigh- 
boring vineyards. 

Adrianople came into its own in 
1361 when Murad 11 took residence 
there and for a century it remained 
the seat of Turkish Sultans. Then 
Constantinople fell and Adrianople 
was shorn of its political importance. 
Bulgarians, Turks, and Creeks have 
all had a hand in governing the city 
from time to time since 1913, but m 
1922 it was returned to Turkey. 



RARATONGA, NEAR SCENE OF 
PACIFIC RESCUE 



I Raratonga is on a direct line be- 
tween New Zealand and Lower Cali- 
| fornia, about 1600 miles from the 
■ former. Since 1900 the island has 
I been a possession of New Zealand 
along with the other Cook Islands 
and adjoining islets. Raratonga is 
.about tile same distance south of the 
Equator as central Cuba and Honolu- 
lu are north of it. Some '.iimiii peo- 
ple live on the Cook Islands, includ- 
ing 300 Europeans. About a third of 
the entire population lives on Rara- 
tonga. Its chief settlement. Avaruna, 
is the seat of government for the is- 
lands within a radius of 250 miles. 

The natives of Raratonga became 
Christianized in 1821. Avaruna now 
has a training school for mission- 
aries maintained by the London Mis- 
sionary Society. In this little town 
of 875 people is a hospital, a wire- 
less station, and even a telephone 
system. 



Raratonga, remote island of the 
South Seas, nearest land to the pas- 
senger steamer that recently sank in 
the Pacific, is the subject of the fol- 
lowing bulletin from the Washington, 
D. C. headquarters of the National 
Geographic Society. But for the res- 
cue by another liner, the 251 men, 
women, and children who were on the 
disabled ship would have had to make 
for Raratonga in open boats. 
Typical South Sea Island 

Raratonga is the most fertile and 
most valuable of the Cook Islands, 
says the bulletin. It might be con- 
sidered the typical South Sea island 
of the volcanic kind — the sort of is- 
land thai a connoisseur of islands 
would most like to see rising above 
his horizon. And it has the added at- 
traction of possessing one of the 
finest tropical climates in the world. 
Durng the warm season (November 
to June) the temperature ranges 
from 74 to 84 degrees Fahrenheit, and 
•luring the cool months, from GO to 
72. The abundant but not excessive 
rains fall mostly during the warm 
season and the island is well watered. 
A unique feature of the island is a 
spring that gushes from the top of 
a peak nearly 2000 feet high, giv- 
ing rise to the principal stream. 

The striking beauty of Raratonga 
arises from its sharp mountain pin- 
nacles, the tallest of which reach 
2100 feet above the sea. and the luxu- 
riant tropical verdure that blanket? 
them to the top. These stage-secn- 
ery-like peaks rise in the center of 
the island and from them the land 
slopes more gentlv to the sea. leav- 
ing a slightly elevated shelf. The 
houses of the villages are built of 
coral whitewashed, with thatched 
roofs. Peeping from the rich green 
foliage, they add greatly to picturcs- 
queness of the island as the observer 
steams along the coast. 

Plantations Rim Mountains 

The island is six miles in length 
and slightly less in breadth. The 
level belt of land between the moun- 
tains and the sea is from one to 
three miles wide. This strip is very- 
fertile and on it flourish coconut 
palms, coffee trees, and a variety of 
tropical fruits. 



The Pastor Says: 

The reason why the Scripture speaks 
of a certain crowded way as lead- 
ing to destruction Is that those 
who travel it do not obey the traffic 
regulations, — John Andrew Holmes. 



Companionship 

Death In battle or in shipwreck, 
with a number of our fellow being! 
sharing the same fate, loses much of 
Us horror simply because it loses its 
loneliness.— American Magazine. 



Spontaneous Action 

Our spontaneous action Is always 
the best. You cannot with your best 
deliberation anil heed come Bo close 
to any question as your spontaneous 
glance shall bring you.— Ralph Waldo 
Km Arson. 

Smart but Unprincipled 

.Turl Tonkins says he bought a gold 
brick and feels pretty smart because 
he never said a word about It until 
he had sold It again at a profit. — 
Washington Star. 



Truth Hurt Him 

An Atchison man pouted for a week 
because one day when he had a sick 
headache and asked bis wife if she 
was worried about him. she replied, 
"No."— AtchisoD Globe. 



Early Use of Monograms 

The Creeks are supposed to have 
oeen the first to use monograms. They 
are found on old fJreek coins and 
rings. The Romans, however, made 
the more personal application to fam- 



Greatness Recognised 

There never was a great truth but 
U was revereced ; never a great In- 
stitution, nor a great man. that did 
not, sooner or later, receive the rev- 
erence of mankind.— Theodore I'urker. 



6 



THK WINCHESTER, MASS. STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER u. i930 



The Winchester Star! 

THEODORE P. WILSON. Editor and 
Publisher: WINCHESTER. MASS. 

SINGLE COPIES, SEVEN CENTS 
Left at Your Residence for One Year 
The W inchester Star, $2.50. in advance ; 



News Items, Lodge Meetings, Society 
Events, Personals, etc., sent to this 
office will Ik- welcomed by the Editor 



EnUrctt at th« poctuflirt at Winch**t*r. 
Maima< huw-Ui, a, nrrond-rlaaa matter. 

TELEPHONE NUMBER 0029 



REPORT OF DR. CHIDLEY'S TRIP 
TO CANADIAN ROCKIES 



Northwest Farm Problems Discussed 



Last July I sat with a North Oak'.- j 
ta farmer on the piazza of his farm- j 
house. As we looked out over hia 
fields he said, "I ought to have a fine 
crop this y« ar if nothing happens, the 
first in four years. Farming; is one 
of the greatest gambles in the world. 
I planted $1200 worth of seed out of 
my granaries this sprint?. Which is 
about the average cost of the seed- 
grain • ach year on this farm, and if I 
get a crop this year it will be, as I 
said, one crop out of four. Add to the 
cost of the seed, the investment in 
land, tock, machinery and buildings, 
plus the cost of preparing the soil and 
putting in the crop, and it totals up 
into thousands of dollars. "Inthe 
township across the road there," he 
continued, "there are only three farm- 
ers who were there before the war 
who have been able to hold their land. 
The r 1 have been sold out." 

This dismal story I heard repeated 
again and again in substantially the; 
sain- language as I swung round a j 
I0i n mile circle recently through our 
own and the Canadian Northwest. 

What are the principal (dements in 
this gamble which the farmer faces? | 
Tiny are weather and economic con- | 
ditions. Consider the weather hazards 
the Northwest farmer faces, hazards | 
which the Eastern farmer knows 
nothing about. What Eastern farm- i 
or, for instance, considers it necessary j 
to carry hail insurance? Yet hml is 
the bete noir of the Northwest farm- j 
er. Til- majority of them carry had 
insurance if they can afford it. And 1 
when I say "hail," I mean had. Our 
small hail-stones here in the East have 
been known to ruin crops, but when 
the hail-stones are frequently as large j 
as hen's eggs, and sometimes as large j 
ns goose-eggs their dostructiveness is 
immeasurably increased. These hail- j 
storms kill chickens and pigs, dent the > 
sides of buildings, smash window-, and | 
mow down crops as (dean as if cut with 
a reaper, We saw one Held of wheat i 
in Saskatchewan where the farmer j 
had nu.de three rounds with his binder | 
before a hail storm struck, and after 
the st irm was ever one could scarcely 
tell the difference between that cut 
by the hinder and that cut by the nail, 
( scrpt ng for the -heaves lying on the 
ground where the binder had been. 
While I was in Saskatchewan another 
hail storm cut a swath 15 miles wide 
and <iu miles long, wiping out practi- 
cally every crop within its range. It 
was so violent that all the windows on j 
the west side of a train passing 
through it were smashed. After every 
hot spell the Northwest farmer lives 
in dn ad of hail. 

Or take, ngain. the matter of wind. 
What Eastern farmer worries about 
having his crop "blown out"? Yet this 
is a constant menace in the Northwest. 
The violent winds, born somewhere 
East of the Hookies, sweep across the 
flat country unohstructe 1 and blow the 
pulverized soil before it, piling it up j 
along the railroad tracks and the road- : 
ways like sand drifts. The roots of 
the crops are left exposed to the j 

scorching sun. and the eron wilts. I 

saw one half-section of wheat, 320 | 
acres, completely "blown out." with 
the exception of a sheltered little tract 
of 30 acres. The wise farmer in the 
Northwest should also carry wind in- 
surance 

Added to these he has the ordina- 
ry hazards of the Eastern farmer, 
drought too much rain, and frost. If 
liis cron ; s wheat, which is the stanle 
crop of the Northwest, he most also 
face tb- hazards of rust and smut. 
The latter falls ns a silent blight some 
hot, dewy morning unon a promising 
field of wheat, ami the market value 
of the crop collanses, 

There is furthermore, the extraor- 
dinarilv difficult situation of weeds to 
contend with. Dirtv and lazv farmers 
have done inestimable barm in the 
Northwest. When land was to bo had 
tor tb- nak'ng, they :>n I their sons 
homesteaded large sections, and pro- 
ceeded to crop it in the most slip-shod 
manner. Some of the land will not 
stand much cultivating, that is true, 
for it is not the heavy, clay land of 
the East, which must be pulverized in 
order to sow a crop, but is mellow soil 
that needs little cultivation as far as 
its texture is concerned. The land 
mvst b- cultivated nevertheless, in 
order to kill the weeds. Some of these 
earlv farmers took unfair advantage 
of the soil and merely ran over it 
hastily, before sowing their crops in 
the spring, with a disc harrow, in- 
stead of ploughing it in the fall. The 
result was that they were forced, in 
time, to abandon their homesteads 
because the soil became so overrun 
r-\th weeds *hs»t it did not pay to crop 
it longer. They moved on and took 
op land elsewhere. But the clean 
farmer is at the mercy of the dirty 
farmer wh< se land is near his. for 
s-eds trnvel on the wind and affect the 
clem farmer's land no matter how 
r>ai n staking he may be. The result is 
that vast facts of th* Northwest have 
become infested w ; th mustard, wild 
oats and sow-thistle. The latter is 
-nosua'ly pestiferous, for it grows 
from the root, and will sprout from 
every node, like witoh-e r ass and will 
stay in the ground indefinitely awa't- 
Ing its rmnortunitv to smother out the 
cron. Net only that, it seems to make 
the soil sour, sn that a crop will not 
«!,•■:- . ivVie-e it ha« thrown, Besides 
the lessened yield, the farmer suffers 
.' . tremendous economic loss on 
account of these weeds for. in order 
to WU them. h» must gnmtn»r-faUow a 
large proportion of his farm each 



A 

LIFE 
INSURANCE 
POLICY 
IS 
A 

SINCERE 

LOVE 
LETTER. 



WILLIAM W. HILL, Agent 

The Northwestern Mutual 
Life Insurance Company 

233 Park Square Building 
Boston 

Phone Hancock 3763— Win. 0418 



tain point in a business or farming 
beyond which neither can be done 
economically without greatly in- 
creased capital. If, for instance, a 
farm of 800 acres can be handled ef- 
ficiently by one man, a tractor and a 
"combine, 1 working at maximum 
speed, it is evident that a 1200 acre 
farm, necessitating an extra tractor, 
an extra combine and extra help will 
not be economically productive. l.a- 
bor costs an 1 supervision are anoth- 
er item of expense which large-scale 

■ farming require-. Machinery is an- 

' other. 

| Machinery is the Dane of the North- 




west farmer, 
is the cost. 

credit, he mil 



In the firs 
If the far 
•t pay nine 



ter< st <:n r 
picion, als 
machinery 
high that 
guess that 
pc 



s notes. One has 
. that the pr ce 
is extravagantly 
one ventures a 
if the farmer nu 
r cent initial payment, thi 
ery company who sold it to 
not stand to lose much if h 
on the other payments. If. 
the farmer has. say five bad 
they have been known to 
Northwest, and cannot m 
ments, tr 
interest charges 
reckoned at compoun 



ce there 
buys on 
cent in- 
the sus- 
of farm 



gn, 



■re is l"> | 



shrewd 
kes a 50 
machin- 
him does 
defaults 
however, 
year.-, as 
have in the 
ke his pay- 



year. By summer-fallow I mean he 
must not sow a crop, but must culti- 
vate this land all summer long in or- 
der to keep the weeds smothered be- 
neath the surface of the ground. Some 
of these Northwest farmers summer- 
fallow one third of their farm each 
year, Think of the economic loss en- 1 
tailed by having one-third of one's J 
land lying idle each year! This pro- 
cess, it is true, gives the land a rest, 
and in some sections farmers deliber- 1 
ately allow certain fields to rest a! 
year in rotation, but this is not done! 
in the proportion or with the economic 
loss with which it is dune in the North- 
west. 

Of course there is still free land in 
the Canadian Northwest. Homesteads 
are being taken as a free gift from 
the Canadian Government. But here, 
again, one faces a new factor in 
Northwest farming. It costs more to 
break up the raw prairie than it did 
in the old days. The cost per acre of 
breaking up new land ranges from 
$10 to $15. Add to this the cost of 
equipment, and the fact that the lirst 
crop must be llax, which is at best a 
precarious crop, for wheat will not 
grow profitably on newly broken prai- 
rie, and the land is not as cheap as 
the first glance would lead one to as- 
sume. As one travels through Sas- 
katchewan, for instance, he sees aban- 
doned farms which were once home- 
steaded by hopeful farmers from the 
United States or Eastern Canada. 
There was nothing the matter with 
the soil, but under modern conditions 
of fa'-ming it was not economically 

profitable. 

That the Northwest farmer is in 
hard straits needs no proof. I talked 
with dozens of these farmers, an I 
there was not one who would not glad- 
ly quit if he could get out with a 
whole skin. Those who bought land 
during the war boom are hopelessly 
bunk. Their farms will not pay the 
interest on their investments at the 
present price of wheat. But even 
those who homesteaded or bought laml 
before the war cannot make farming 
pav. 

The remedies suggested, both by the 
farmers themselves, and others, are 
legion, Some sav it must be more 
mixed forming. By that they mean 
that the farmer must grow less wheat 
and grow more of other grains, and 
feed those- to livestock, thus getting 
their main income out of livestock. 
The situation In the wheat-market of 
the Northwest today is parallel to 
that which the Ontario farmers were 
facing :?0 years ago. The Ontario 
farmer could not survive at the prices 
paid in those days if he shinped his 
grain to market as grain. He there- 
fore fed his grain to hog- and cattle 
and sold it as livestock. He went so 
far as to combine and ship his cattle 
to the English markets direct, without 
paving the middleman-drover a com- 
mission. On that basis he survived 
and made money. 

One North Dakota farmer, at least, 
has learned that lesson. On his farm 
1 saw over 100 hogs last July that 
will be ready for the market this 
fall. He has also 30 head of cattle to 
which he will feed his grain. These 
hogs and cattle will furnish an eco- 
nomic buttress against bankruptcy if 
the bottom drops out of the grain 
market this year, as it seems reason- 
ably certain to do. What will become 
of the farmers who have gambled 
solely on wtftat is hard to conjecture. 
Perhaps, if they survive, they will 
learn not to put all their eggs In one 
basket again. 

Others are convinced that the 
Northwest farmer is trying to handle 
too much land. Farms of 800 to 1000 
acres are too large to be handled ef- 
ficiently, they say. On the contrary, 
there are those who are convinced 
that, with modern farm-macihinery 
and modern methods the solution lies 
in still larger farms. One farmer, 
with a tractor and "combine." that is 
a machine which cuts and threshes 
the grain in one operation, can farm 
S00 acres with no hired labor except- 
ing two extra men at harvest time. 
My own observation leads me to the 
conviction that there are two things 
fundamentally wrong with the North- 
west farmer. In the first place he has 
too much land to handle efficiently. 
In the second place, he has an obses- 
sion on wheat. 

As to the first, a large-scale North 
Dakota farmer said. "I have always 
been told that you couldn't go wrong 
en land, so I bought more and more 
of it. I am convinced I was wrong. 
I have spread out so far that my hold- 
ings are gradually eating up the 
original homestead." We are familiar 
with the phrase "land poor." A great 
number of Northwest farmers are 
just that. But let me explain how 
this has come about. There are in- 
creasing tax-rates, for instance. 
Roads are being built, forced on the 
country by the automobile. More 
land means more aggregate taxes, 
and if the land is not paying, the 
more land one has the worse off he is. 
In addition to the taxes there is the 
cost of equipment. There is a eer- 



ier cent gone in I 
More than that if 
interest, which 
is what happens. Add to this the fact 
that the farmers have no facilities 
for housing their machinery, due to 
the high cost of lumber, and it there- 
fore deteriorates rapidly and needs 
replacing or is out of date by the time 
it is paid for in many case--, and it 
needs little imagination to see how 
machinery eats up the farmer's 
profits. 

There are others who maintain 
that the solution of the Northwest 
farmer's troubles lies in consolidation 
in marketing. Two factors militate 
against this. The farmer is an indi- 
vidualist. He finds it difficult to com- 
bine with other farmers, and when 
he does, to withstand the temptation 
to sell outside the organization if his 
own personal advantage is to be 
served. To illustrate, there was a 
meeting of farmers in North Dakota 
a year ago at which the government 
farm-representative in the district 
urged the farmers to diversify their 
crops to the extent at least that of 
growing ten per cent less wheat the 
next year. All the farmers at the 
meeting agreed to sow ten per cent 
less wheat the following year. The 
farm agent happened to overhear on 
the train that evening two German 
farmers who entered the agreement, 
talking in their native tongue. One 
of them said to the other, "now that 
the other farmers are going to grow 
less wheat next year, we'd better 
grow more." The other assented! 

But even when the Northwest farm- 
er has been able and willing to com- 
bine, as in the various wheat and 
grain pools, his inexperience as a 
business man has frequently led to 
unfortunate results. While I was in 
a certain North Dakota village this 
summer there was quite a furor arose 
because it was discovered that some 
of the farmer-directors of the local 
grain ebvator had been using the sur- 
plus funds of the organization to buy 
wheat futures. These futures had 
collapsed and the $15,000 gambled 
was gone, thus wiping out the entire 
reserve fund. A meeting of the stock- 
holders was called, and from reports 
it was a highly exciting meeting. But 
what was done with the defaulting di- 
rectors? Nothing. The directors and 
stockholders were neighbors. No- 
body wanted to cause ill-feeling by 
making accusations or pressing de- 
mands for refunding the cash. The 
result was, that although each of the 
miscreant directors were property- 
owners, none of them was obliged to 
give any security whatsoever that 
the money would be refunded. The 
meeting broke up with merely vague 
promises on the part of the directors. 
Such a fiasco could not have occurred 
in an organization where the stock- 
holders were accustomed to the first 
principles of valid business methods, 
As another illustration of the hazy 
ideas many of these Northwest farm- 
ers have as to business procedure. I 
listened to a Saskatchewan farmer 
singing the praises of the wheat pool. 
He told .how he had got higher prices 
for his grain since he had joined the 
pool and a higher grading for his 
wheat. When I asked him, however, 
what cash reserves the pool had in 
case it could not later sell its wheat 
at the initial price paid him and oth- 
er farmers, he did not know. He had 
not thought that far. 

As a matter of fact this is the crux 
of the entire financial structure of 
the wheat pool, and vitally affects 
the farmer, as I shall show. Take 
the situation which the Canadian 
wheat pool faces today. The Canadian 
wheat pool held onto the 1929 crop 
because of reports of a shortage in 
the Argentine and United States 
wheat crops last yea.-, expecting that 
prices would rise above the Septem- 
ber quotations. The pool executives 
failed to reckon on the immense car- 
ry-over of the 1928 wheat crop in 
Argentine, which was dumped on the 
European markets at less than the 
pool price paid the farmers. The 
pool held on. in the meanwhile pay- 
ing in some cases storage of one and 
one-half cents per bushel per month, 
and still the price if wheat dropped! 
Carrying charges in the past have 
run as high as 34 cents per bushel on 
Canadian pool wheat. The pool ad- 
vanced $1 per bushel to its farmer 
patrons for September 1929 wheat. 
When the price of wheat declined be- 
low $1 the banks which were support- 
ing the pool pressed for security. At 
least three Northwest provincial gov- 
ernments cam- to the rescue of the 
banks. But these governments are 
not in private business. Even though 
the Canadian wheat pool does include 



An Easy Way To Accumulate 
Funds For Your /axes 

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$1.00 CLASS PAYS $50.00 

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Interest added if all payments are made regularly or in advance 



JOIN 



Winchester 

NATIONAL 

Bank 



TODAY 



1 m ffimffimmimmfflffiffim 




CM 



Pies and cakes for Thanksgiving. 
Mistress Mary, Win. 0985 or Win. 
1779-R. 

ceedings make the farmer stick by a 
sinking ship? Nobody knows. My 
hazard is, from what 1 have seen of 
Ann rican farmers under like condi- 
tions, that he will not. Should such 
be the case, what will happen to the 
pool? Evidently an effort is being 
made, as I write, to force all farmers 
into the pool, Such an effort will, 
however, be as ineffective as an at- 
tempt to call a universal strike. 

Buy New Er .nd Coke from your 
local dealer. J. 7. Winn & Co. 

One cannot help feeling sorry that 
the pool is in such straits. There is 
no doubt that in the past it has been 

of great benefit to the farmer, both 

financially and as a lesson in combina- We have a few tons of Cannel Coal 
tion marketing. Should the pool fail, in Stove and Nut sizes which, we are 
the psychological effect will be felt closing out at $16.50 per ton. $8.50 
for a century. The farmer does not 1 " or half ton. $4.50 quarter ton, while 
easily forget. He is slow to trust lasts - ■»• P- Winn & Co. 
others, and failure here, in his lirst Calendar pads at the Star Office, 
venture, will burn deeply into his Miss Fanny J. Bowse;-, a former 
memory and make him and his de- well known storekeeper of this town, 



THANKSGIVING DINNER 

BY RESERVATION 

Mistress Mary Indoor Tea Room 

93 WILDW00D STREET WINCHESTER 



TEL. WIN. 0985 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



. individual 
now on dis- 



scendants doubly timid in the face of 
any new venture. 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



nearly 140,000 farmers 



the 



entire I 



population cannot fairly be taxed for 
the benefit of the farmer. Someone 
will have to pav the governments in- 
volved. The logic is plain. The 
farmers in the pool will have to make 
up the deficit. This involves a great 
strain on the loyalty of the farmer, 
individualist by nature as he is. as I 
have already pointed out. Of course 
he has signed a contract with the 
pool. Heretofore the pool has been 
known to sue members who haye 
broken their contract by selling to 
outside markets. They have won 
their suits. Will fear of legal pro- 



Mr. and Mrs. Claude G. Fleming, 
and Miss Myrtle Fleming of 8 Glen 
road, this town, have left for their 
winter home in St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Mr. Claude H. Fleming is very much 
interested in the game of Shuffle- 
board. He has been captain of the 
Massachusetts team for the past two 
years. 

Select your Christmas cards now 
while our stock is complete. There 
are some most attractive new cards 
for your approval at the Star Office. 

Mr. Richard Parkhurst, secretary of 
the Boston Port Authority, was one 
of those making the trip about Bos- 
ton Harbor last Friday on the tug j 
Nathaniel P. Doane as the first step 
toward ridding the harbor of rotting 
hulks and floating debris which have , 
long constituted a menace to shipping 
and health. On the east side of Chel- j 
sea creek were counted 125 hulks that 
have rested submerged from 20 to 40 
years, and at the intersection of Bor- j 
dor and Condor streets were found 18 
hulks While the investigating com- 
mittee were studying rubbish condi- 
tions off the New Haven docks, South 
Boston, a submerged object fouled the 
tug's propellor, forcing her into dry- 
dock for repairs estimated to cost 
about $250. 

We have the "Beacon Scotch" im- 
ported Coal in Egg. Stove and Nut 
sires. Parker & Lane Co. 

Mr. H. D. I.ikins of Gien road was 
one of those who reported the loss of 
coats from automobiles parked in the 
vicinity of Harvard square during the 
Harvard-Michigan football game last , 
Saturday afternoon. A top coat was | 
teken from Mr. Likins' machine which 
was parked at Harvard and Quincy | 
streets. 

Don't forget the Christmas Bazaar 
and Food Sale by Victoria Rebekah 
Lodge, Thursday. Nov. 20. from 4 to 
10 p. m. at Association Bu 
Vine street. Old-fashioned bean sup- 
per served at 6:30. Tickets :b r >c. 
Bridge and whist in the evening. 

Patrolman John H. N'oonan of the 
Police Department reported a wire o'clock the same evening 
down at the corner of Harvard and ' It is not too early to think about 
Washington streets on Armistice Day. Christmas cards, printed with your 
The Eastern Massachusetts Street name. A fine line is awaiting your 
Railway repair crew was notified and ( inspection at the Star Office, 
repaired the damage. ; The Winchester Girls' A A. held 

John J. Murphy, Dealer in JunK of ; a bridge in Fortnightly Hall Wed- 
• * " nesday evening to raise the club's 

quota of the money necessary to send 
the All-Boston Association eleven to 
Philadelphia for the championship 
playoff. 



died at Fast Pepperell on Sunday. She 
was about 1)2 years of age and for a 
period of about 55 years conducted the 
dry goods store on Mt. Vernon street 
now owned by Mr. J. Raymond Ban- 
croft. Mr. Bancroft bought her out 
in 1910. The funeral services were 
held on Wednesday, the remains be- 
| ing cremated, and the ashes are to be 
| intered in Wildwood Cemetery. 

Miss Catherine McGowan of this 
town, returned home after spending 
the past week in New York visiting 
: friends. 

We are snowing our usual com- 
plete line of diaries, line-a-day and I 
engagement books. Good selection, 
! wide range of prices. At the Star , 
Office. 

Fancy paper napkins, tor bridges j 
1 and luncheons, at the STAR office. | 
Mrs. Bowen Tufts of Winchester is j 
noting as treasurer for the Copley | 
Plaza premiere on Friday morning, 
Nov. 21, when the Grand Duchess Ma- j 
rie of Russia is to speak under the 
auspices of the Massachusetts League 
of Women Voters, on "My Escape 
from Russia — and Since." 

Call us for your supply of New 
England Coke. Parker & T.ane Co. 

Rev. Howard J. Chidley, D.D.. pas- 
tor of the First Congregational 
Church, with Prof. Harry F. Ward of 
New York and former Bishop Fred 
B. Fisher contributed to the discus- 
sion of "The Social Functions of the 
Christian Church" which was one of 
the many features of the 27th annual 
meeting of the Massachusetts Feder- 
ation of Churches, held in conjunc- 
tion with the meeting of the Massa- 
chusetts Council of Religious Educa- 
tion on Wednesday and Thursday in 
Lowell. Many prominent clergy were 
in attendance. 

All the boys are flying model aero- 
planes. Can be had in Winchester for 
$] at the STAR office. 

A Chrysler roadster reported stolen 
Sunday evening from the residence of 
Mr. Frederick C. Hitchcock. 29 Wedge- 
mere avenue, wa- recovered Wednes- 
ding. 34 day morning in Cambridge. A Buick 
coupe, stolen from the residence of 
Mr. Richard F. Fenno of Wildwoo i 
street. Armistice afternoon, was re- 
covered in Cambridge shortly after 9 
c' ' 



New Christmas cards 
and box assortments, are 
play at the Star Office. 

Superintendent of Schools James J. 
Quinn was elected a member of the 
i executive committee of the Southern 
i .Middlesex Health Association, Inc. at 
! the annual meeting held last week 
Thursday in the North Reading State 
Sanatorium. Rev. C. P. Wellman of 
Woburn, a former resident of Win- 
chester, was also elected to the com- 
mittee. 

See the handsome new line of 
greeting cards for Christmas at the 
Star Office. 

Corner Stone of Republic 

Though the meek may Inherit tha 
earth, agitation 1ms a place In life. 
The theory that something ought to be 
done about something Is the corner 
stone of our republic. Constructive 
criticism Inspired the saga of fault- 
finding, which gave George III a pain 
In the neck.— Toledo Blade. 



Claitet of Diplomati 

The terms career and non-career In 
reference to the United states foreign 
service refer respectively to men who 
have taken up the foreign service ns 
their profession and to men who aro 
appointed from private life to diplo- 
matic positions. 



World'* Fir.t Settlementi 

So far as history and archeology 
tell, the first cities or towns In tho 
world were built by the Sumerlans 
In the Tigris-Euphrates valley per- 
haps as early as 4"ri x ) B. C. Towns and 
villages exist today on gome of these 
sites, hut none can be pointed to ns 
exlstine contlnously. — National Geo- 
graphic Society Bulletin, 



New York Prison* 

Sin? Sim: was first culled the Mount 
Pleasant prison and Is historically the 
third In order of New York state 
prisons. The first is Newgate prison, 
built In 1701, In New York city, and 
the second Is Auburn prison, built In 
1810. The Sine Sine cell block was 
built entirely by prisoners with stones 
taken from the prison quarry. It was 
started In May, l»'jr», and was com- 
pleted in 1828. 



All Kinds. Highest prices paid. If 
vou have anything in this line, tele- 
phone either Winchester 0924. 0824-W 
or drop a postal to 28 Church street. 

mh9-tf 



Sheffield PUt* 

A/tides of Sheffield plate are made of 
copper and coated with silver by a 
process of fusion. About 1742 Thomaa 
BoulSover discovered accidentally that 
an application of heat would fuse the 
two materials so that they could be 
worked as one. Joseph Hancock, a 
relative of th*» Inventor, soon applied 
It to the making of candlesticks and 
other articles for domestic use. The 
first factory for production on an ex- 
tensive scale was founded in 1700 by 
Tudor and Leader. 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER U. 1930 



N 4 

of Facts and Figures 

ABOUT 

Co-Operative Banks 

\\ hilc the *izr of a financial institution not the in«>-t 
important factor that ininlit be cited, yet it i- interesting to 
note that thrr<- are eighty-nine institutions of our t> |»«- in 
the I nited States with individual assets exceeding ten mil- 
lion dollars. 

Of ilii- ^n>ii|i of eighty-nine institutions, six are Co- 
operative Hank- located in Massachusetts. 

Current reports show that each and every Co-operative 
it.uik in Massachusetts i- sound and Btrong, — a worthy de- 
pository for tit*- investment of savings, 

oi r sii \m;s are pa\ in<; iysu 



SUNDAY SERVICES 



FIRST BAPTIST CHUKCH 

Rev. liin;aniin I'. Browne. Pastor, 31 Church 
■treet. 



Winchester Co-operative Bank 

11 Church Street, Winchester Telephone 1078 



W illard T. Carleton 
John ( hallis 
Ernest K. Kustis 
Vincent Farnsworth 
Georjfe A. Fernald 



DIRECTORS 
James J. Fitzgerald 
Charles A. (ileason 
Daniel W. Hawes 
Alfred II. Ilildreth 
James Hinds 



Raymond Merrill 
Curtis W. Nash 
Sewall E. Newman 
Frank E. Randall 
Samuel S. Symmes 



Sunday. Nov. 16, i< :30 A. M. — Church 
School. Cla.-**** for all axes. 

9:30 A. M. Everyman's Class meets in 
social hall. All men welcome. 

10:45 A. M. Morninir worship. Sermon 
by the putor: My Idea of the Won! of Hod." , 
Junior talk: "On Guard Dut>." Music by 
quartet and senior choir. 

P. M Meeting of Comrades of the Cross. 
Leader. Marjorie Finger. Subject : "Loving 
Ail God's Children." 

>; P. M. V. P. S. C. E. Leader, Leslie 
Hili. Subject: "Our Pledge for Christ ami ; 
the Church." All young people incited. 

T p. M -Evening service. Sermon l>y the 
pastor. "Are You Keady ?" 

M mday, 8 P. M. -Meeting of the Board of 
Religious Education in church parlor. 

Tuesday, 8:30 P. M. Junior Christian En- : 
deavor. Leader, Pauline Lindsay. Subject: 
"Children in Blue and What lluy Do, ...i , 
l">- and girls of 12 years and under are wel- j 
come. 

icesday, 8 P. M.— Regular meeting of tha 
E P. H. classroom. 

Wednesday. 7 ;4o P. M. Prayer meeting. 
The speaker will be Rev. John Lake, D.D., 

of Shamrhai. t t. ind' r ■ ... * 

to the Lepers. Dr. Lake has been decorated 

by ine Ciunese bovermnuni, ui.u ..as ...... 

derfUj story to tell. 

Enday, .". I'. M. Regular meeting of the 
World Wide Uuild in social hall. 

Friday, H 1'. M. Reception to Miss Lydia 
Jennie Crawford, recently returned mission- , 
ary of this church, by the Woman's League, j 
E. P. H. Class and Philathea Class. All mi ni- | 
bers and friends of the church are invited. 



SECOND CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

Rev. John E, Whitley, Pastor. .">it7 'A ash- 
ington street. Tel. Win. 0756-J. 



Sunday. 10:30 A. M. Evidences of Church i 
I ii) ults . 

12 M. Sunday School. 

7 P. M. Whin U.<i Christian Religion Be- 
er n. 

Tuesday, 7:1". I". M. November meeting of 
the Adult Bible Class. 

Wednesday. 7:45 1'. M. Mid-week study of 
the Commandments. 

Friday, 8 1'. M. A first class entertain- 
ment, Sain Tyack, the man of many moods," 
will be given in assembly hall. Proceeds to 
pay balance of church pledge of the Corner- 
stone (.'lass. 

Sunday. Nov. ll:i Every Member Canvass to 
receive pledges for church support for 1H31. 



LOST AND FOUND 



LOST Saturday, vicinity of Lewis road or 
Thompson stro't mid Economy Grocery Store, 
black Onyx and silver bracelet; reward. Tel. 
Win 1424. 

LOST A pair of spectacles in black case, 
between Lawson roail nod Winchester Sav- 
ings Bank . reward. Tel. Win. 0532-M. 



LANDSCAPE PLANTING 
SI1RLBS AND TREES 
at the Mtlrose Nurseries 

A. M. TUTTLE & CO. 

261 Howard >jtr«t. 
Melrose Highlands Mass. 
Tel. Melrese 0042 

mhlo-tf 



FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 

All Seats Free 

Sunday, Nov 16 Subject, "Mortals and 
Immortals." 

Siimhlj Sel I at 12 o'clock. 

Services in the ( lunch Building opposite the 
Town Hall. 10:4.1 A. M. 

Wednesday livening meeting nt 7:1' I . M. 

Rending com in Church Building, Open 
ilnily from 1J M. t.. ."> IV M. except Sundays 
and holidays. 



HELP WANTED 



FOR KENT Stall in private garage, Wash- 
ington street, near center. Tel. Win. 1326. 

o3-tf 



F<ilt KENT Six room apartment and sun- 
Brlor, fireplace; garage if desired oil Park 
venue. Tel. Win. 1836-M. olO-tf 



Foil KENT Upper apartment of ^ix 
room- an.l mi parlor, 1 Park road. Tel. 
Win. 0209-W, 



First Class Upholstering 

SLIP COVERS MADE TO ORDER 
MATTRESSES 
Repair Work a Specialty 

H. J. ROSCOE 

38 CHESTNUT RD. STONETIAM 

Telephune 0472-W 
Reference ap8-tf Reasonable 



CHURCH OF THE EPIPHANY 

The Rev, Truman Heminway, B.D., Rector. 
I'hnne, Win. 11)22. 

Ib'licnucss Helen I'. Lane, Will, lil.lti, 
I'lliiall House, Win. 1B22. 



TO LET 3 sunny, warm room- furnished, 
on bathroom floor, gas, light, heat ; very rea- 
sonable. Tel Win. U721-W. • 

To LET Private family desires a refined 
paying guest, beautiful, convenient location. 
Tel. Win. 1224-M. * 

TO LET Heated room on bathroom floor. 
.».'. Vine street, nll-tf 



ONE, TWO AND THREE ROOM 

Apartments in Stetson Hail 

Now ready for ocrupanry. Rent $1.7 
lo $1*0 per month. Every modern con- 
venience. Including elevator and re- 
frigeraion. APPLY TO THE JANITOR. 



To LET Lnrg< 
nishi d : no other i 

07HU-M. 



room furnished or unfur- 
imers : very central. Tel. 



To LET Large, furnished, front room, 
hot water heat. Tel. Win. 1046-W. 



TO LET Furnished room 
floor Tel. Win. 0695. 



an batln 



TO LET Modern live room apartment, 
rent reasonable . easy to heat and tine loca- 
tion. Apply at 14 Park road in- cull Win. 
0726-M, * 



FOR SALE 



FIREPLACE WOOD!!! 

4 foot lengths (per cord) ...$18.00 

Cut any length (extra) 2.00 

$20.00 

Hard mountain growth dried under 
cover. Also, kindling wood. SI LOO 
and $16.00. ROGER S. HKATTIK. 
tel. Wob. 0139. au29-tf 



FIREPLACE WOOD 

VERY FANCY, all cleft gmal sized white birch 
$18 per cord. 4 ft. lengths; $20 sawed; maple 
and oak $lti per cord. 4 ft. lengths, $ls 
saw ed: kindling wood 6 bu. $1: 211 bu. $11; 
35 bu. 15. All wood may be seen in yard at 
52 High street. Woburn. Frizicll Bros., tel. 

Woburn of.70. si2-tr 



1926 CHEVROLET COUPE 

For Sale 

In perfect mechanical condition, 
good tires, needs painting, $7.1 cash. 
TEL. WIN. 0981 



FOR SALE Mason and Hamlen upright 
piano. Kood condition; $12.7. Tel. Win. 
0588-M. * 



FOR SALE Two Selyham pups; low price. 
Tel. Win. l»16. 

FOR SALE Apples. Macintosh Rods. Bald- 
win ami Northern Spy. Walter H Dot ten. 
10 Alhen street, Winchester. Tel. (!72fi. sS-tf 

FOR SALE Stelnway Upright piano, in 
splendid condition. See E I.. Thorn. |uist, 
e ,. Butterworth's Jewelry Store, Win. 1«S7-R. 



MISCELLANEOUS 
SECRETARY-STENOGRAPHER 

With over ten years' experience and 
living in Winchester would accept 
work as public stenographer or do 
private typing one or two evenings 
a week. Write Bos Y. Star Office. 

nl4-2t* 



THREE PLY ROLL ROOFING 

$1.25 SLATE SURFACED 
Ashpalt Shinnies . . . $.1.(MI a square and up 

liia.k Sheet Steel Ash I ans «()c each 

Flat White Paint $1.00 per gallon 

Hard, Dry Cord Wood $16. no per cord 

H. M. ALPEKIN & CO. 
.727 Concord Ave. ( amh 'idge, Mass. 

Tel. Porter 15N0 — University >>6>>i< 

o31-13t 

AMERICAN GLASS COMPANY 

Glass For AH Purposes 

MIRRORS RESILVEKKI) 

.!fi!l Ferry St. Everett, Mass. 

Tel. Everett 0911 

Winchester (alls and Deliveries Twice 
Weekly 



SNOWFLAKE GARDENS 

Baltic E. Snow, Prop. 
39 FOREST ST. TEL. WIN. 1018—1057 

Rock Gardens Constructed and 
Planted. Planting of Evergreens 
and Shrubs. Perennial and Alpine 
Plants for Sale. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHI'SETTS 

MIDDLESEX. SS. PROBATE COURT 

To the heirs-at-!aw, next of kin and all 
other persons interested in the estate of 
Charles 1 Mitchell late of Winchester in ^aid 
County, deceased. 

WHEREAS, a certain instrument purport- 
ing to be the last will and testament of said 
deceased has Ihh n presented to said Court, 
tor probate by The Boston Safe Deposit and 
Trust Company and Chauncey L. Mitchell 
who pray that letters testamentary mas be 
issued to them, the executors therein named, 
without giving a surety on their official bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a Pro- 
bate Court to be heM at Cambridge in said 
County of Middlesex, on the fir>t day ..f De- 
cember A. Ii. 1930, at ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon, to show cause, if any you have, why 
the same should not be granted. 

And said petitioners are hereby directed to 
fcive public notice thereof, by publishing this 
citation once in each week, for thrive succes- 
sive weeks, in The Winchester Star a news- 
paper published in Winchester the la>l pub- 
lication to he one day, at least, before said 
Court, and by mailing, post-paid, or deliver- 
ing a Copy of this citation to all known per- 
sons interested in the estate, seven days at 
bust before said Court. 

Witness, JOHN C. LEGGAT, Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, this thirteenth day of 
November in the year one thousand nine hun- 
dred and thirty. 

LORING P. JORDAN. Register 

nl4-.1t 



Nov. 16 22nd Sunday after Trinity. 

Holy Communion. M a. m. 
Church School, p :;;u a. m. 
Morning prayer. 11 a. m, 
Kindergarten and primary department, 11 
n. m. 

Evening prayer, 5 p. m. 

Tuesday, Nov. 1 s, : :in a. m. Holy Com- 
munion. 

Meetings 

Tuesday, Nov. Is. 111.4 : all-day sewing; 
luncheon, 12:30. 

Wednesday, Nov. 19, 7 p. m. Evening 
Branch. 

Friday, Nov. 21. 10:15 a. ni. Mrs. Nicholas 
Burke on "The Life of Prayer.*' 

UNITARIAN CHURCH 

Rev. George Hal- Reed. Minister, K Ridge- 
Held road. T.I. Win. 11424. 

Sunday, Now ill Public service of worship 
at 10:48. Mr. Reed will preach. Subject; 
"Religion and Dividends," a sermon for 
Kvery-Memb.r Sunday. The primary De- 
partment of the Sunday School, including the 
kindergarten through the third grade w ill 
rro*et a* 10:45. The junior department, in- 
cluding the fourth grade throueh the eighth, 
will meet at 9:30, The Metcalf Union will 
meet at 12 in the Meyer Chapel The mu- 
sic for the morning church service will be 
"s follows : 

Organ Prelude Adagio from Svmphony No. 2 

Widor 

First Anthem Seek Him that. Maketh the 

Seven Stars Rovers 

Second Antrim Thou Wilt Keep Him in Per- 
fect PeHc>» Peace 

Orgnn Postlude Cortpga Dunuhan 

Tue«dav, Nov. IX The Neighborhood meet- 
ing of the Ladies' Friendly Society. The 
Board meet., at 1 :30, th<> regular meeting is 
at ? :30 p. m. Tea will lie served. 

Nov. IB from 2 t" ii in the sfternoon. w III 
be our "Fverv-Memb-'r Canvass" to provide 
for th > financial needs of nur church for the 
year N - 1 IflSn to Oct. tl 19S1 The can- 
vass will he conducted by .Ml men of the church 
who are giving up the afternoon for this 
worthy task. Mr William 1). F.nton is di- 
recting th- work, assisted by Mr. Norman 
and Mr. Albion Danforth. 

Crawford Memorial 
MFTI*'»ni«T ppmrnint riipifll 

Corn«r Church and Oix «tr»«>ts. R»v, .1. 
West Thompson. Minister Residence, 3n Dix 
street. Tel. Win. 0539-M, 



WINCHESTER TRUST COMPANY 

WINCHESTER MASS. 




MEMBER OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



CONDENSED STATEMENT 

as rendered to the Comptroller as of the close of Business Sept. 24, 1930 

RESOIRCES LIABILITIES 

Cash and Due from Banks. .$ 197,428.13 Capital $ 100,000.00 

U. S. Bonds 219,370.94 Surplus and Profits 282,324.79 

Other Stocks and Bonds ... 1,099,680.99 Reserve for Taxes and In- 

Loans and Discounts 1,113,400.81 torest 11,500.00 

Ilankinir House 62,509.36 Reserve lor Amortization 

and Depreciation 32.727.95 

Deposits, Commercial 1,163,169.10 

> Deposits, Savings 1,102,668.29 

$2,692,390.23 $2,692,390.23 
Officer $ 

RALPH E. JOSPIN, President CHARLES E. BARRETT, Treasurer 

FREELAND E. HOVEY, Vice President O. DWIGHT CABOT. Assistant Treasurer 
FRED L. PATTEE, Vice President HELEN M. MONROE, Assistant Treasurer 



CHARLES E. BARRETT 
CUTLER B. DOWNER 
.) ERE A. DOWNS 
GEORGE A. FERNALD 
HENRY C. GUERNSEY 



Director* 

H. WADS WORTH HIGHT 
FREELAND E. HOVEY 
RALPH E. JOSLIN 
JAMES NOWELL 



WILLIAM L. PARSONS 
FRED L PATTEE 
EDWIN R. ROONEY 
FREDERIC s. SNYDER 
CHARLES H. SYMMES 



TO CALL MERCHANTS TOGETER 
ON CLOSING 



['resident George F. Arnold <>f the 
Winchester Chamber of Commerce an- 
nounced yesterday that the Chamber 
is planning to invito all merchants of 
the town tn a get-together discussion 
of the holiday closing problem, A 
mure definite announcement will be 
made in the near future, and will be 
welcomed by local business men who 
are tired of the haphazard conditions 
which have prevailed in the past. 



It's smart to be thrifty 



AIR TRAVEL CREATES NEW 
TIES BETWEEN THE TWO 
AMERICAS 



Church School at 9:r<0. Mr. Vir,... r i P, 
Clarke, Sunt. Men's Class, tau-ht hv Prof 
Kenneth Rpvnnldfi. Other well organised 
classes for nil Hires and a welcome to all who 
come. 

Morning worship nt 10:30. Sermon snh- 

ieet : "Contact nnd Strength " C let solo: 

"Th" I ost Chord." by Mr. Clenn Hopkins. 

TupsdBv Fpworth t.eamie Institute «t 
Wakefield. Sin ner betrins at (5:1". 

Werineftdnv Prayer service nt 7-t.V Topic: 
"Reasons for Thnnkseivinc " Whnt form 
should our gratitude this venr take? Psalm 

int. 

Friday The Men's Clnss will hold a su*".or 
and social m«etintr at the home of Mr. Nor. 
man H ! »c»<c<ick S Conley street 'it « 110. Prof. 
Kenneth Reynolds will *rivo an i1Uigt* > ated :ol- 
dress on hjs life nnd experiences in C.erirtsnv. 
Trier* will be election of ofneer* and a ".k»1 
social time. Every man of the church is 
coH ; nllv invited. 

Friday VerMnc- of th" junior choir at the 
church nt 3:46. Fvery junior is invited. 

Friday The Standard Rearers will meet 
with Dorothv nnd Virginia Fancie at their 
home on Arlington street at 7 :30. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHt'RCH 

Pee Howard .1. Chidley. D.D.. Minister. 
Residence, Fernwav. Tel. Win noTl. 
Mr. Jay A. Wabeke. assistant. 



WORK WANTED Accoinmodator or gen- 
eral work. Write Box t... 1 M. I... Star 
Office. " 



Cl'HTAINS AND DRAPERIES -AR kind* 
made Ui order. We do hemstitching. Perry. 
16 Pleasant street. Medford. Tel. Mystic 
flSTlJ. n6-tf 



POSITION WANTED - Reliable woman , 
would like work evenings caring for children, t 
( all Mystic U715-J. n7-^f 



SECOND MORTGAGE 1.0A>» r^ade from 
our own funds. We also buy mortgage notes 
or lend on them as collateral. We are not 
brokers and your dealings are solely wiOl us. 
Mvstic Valley Mortgage Co. 7 Forest Street. 
Medford. Phone Mystic 02R6. jall-tf 

POSITION WANTED A Protestant girl 
of 19, from New Brunswick desires position 
in tfmsl family, can do housework and is 
anxious to learn cooking, no washing. Tel. 
Milton SS70 or write Box N, Star Office. • 



A REFINED, willing colored boy wants 
work of any kind, chauffeur or helper, ref- 
erence*. Apply 2". Irving street, Winchester. 

PIANO WANTED Willing to store 
piano during the winter for its use. In Rood 
home ; excellent care 
Office, 



Write Box E, Star 



WANTED (ienersl housework wanted by a 
mother w ishing to keep her child w ith her : 
reasonable wages and references. Apply Miss 
Burton. U State House, Boston. 

WANTED General housework by girl thor- 
oughly experienced and best of references. 
Tel. Win. 2077-M. • 



WANTED - Garage space near Winchester 
Chambers. Tel. Win. 1867-J. • 



No Job for Cowards 

Real conservation involves wise, 
non-wasteful use In the present 
generation, with every possible 
means of preservation for succeed- 
ing generations. The harden is on 
the present generation to solve 
this problem, and nut to run away 
from it as onwards, lest in the at- 
tempt to meet it we may make 
some mistake.— William Howard 
Taft. 



Morning worship at 10:30 The Sacrament 
of the Lord's Supper will be observed. Dr 
Chidley will speak on, "A Table in a Charmed 
Circle." 

Sunday School Visitors are always wel- 
come. The departments meet as follows : 
10:30 to lt:46, kindergarten and primary de- 
partments: 11 :2o to in :2n, junior department, 
grades 4, "> and fi, Ripley Chapel; 12 to 1. 
intermediate and senior departments, grades 
7 ami 8 nnd high school. Ripley Chanel. 

The Young People's Society meets at 6 
o'clock in Ripley Chapel. Dr. J, Churchill 
Hindes will speak on, "Dentistry as a Pro- 
fession." in the series of addresses on life 
w-ork. Miss Madeline Little will lead. 

Mid-week service on Wednesday at 7 :!.">. 
Mr. Wabeke's subject will be: "The Nature 
of Religion " 

Men's Club dinner. Nov. 20. parish house at 
*:3ii. Mr Lawrence Lombard will show mo- 
tion pictures of his thrilling bear hunt in 
Alaska this summer. This is the annual 
meeting of the club. 



Fish That Walk 

Several specimens of the walking 
fish were demonstrated at an outdoor 
life show held In Chicago. This spe- 
cies has its breathing apparatus adapt- 
ed tn life out of the water. By means 
of its tins and gills it can travel over- 
land from one body of water to an- 
other. It is found In Asiatic waters.— 
Pathfinder Magazine. 



Hi w airplane s are blazing new 
travel paths between the Americas, 
rescuing many places from long-time 
obscurity, and Kivinjc a cosmopolitan 
touch to' others, is told in the follow- 
ing bulletin by Frederick Simpich, 
National Geographic Society corres- 
pondent with the party making an 
aerial survey from New York to 
Buenos Aires: 

Prom New York to Buenos Aires is 
strung a line of American boys in 
overalls. Some are seaplane pilots; 
some are mechanics, with grease 
»;uns and wrenches; some are radio 
operators. There also are agents 
and tickit sellers, stationed at various 
ports. For now an air line for mail 
and passengers ties the two Ameri- 
cans together, and a small army of 
highly trained men is required to fly 
and care for the airplanes which 
operate this loner-distance service. 
Hotel Registers Tell Story 

At our hotel in Para, 27 puests 
from the United States were regis- 
tered. All were seaplane employees 
or air passengers. Already, seaplane 
tatrons and crews have increased 
business enough in some remote parts 
off the main steamship lanes, so that 
new or remodeled hotels are discussed. 

Flying has brought new types to 
cities all the way from Havana and 
San Juan de Porto Rico to Para and 
Pemambuco. Guests at hotels are 
accustomed now to seeing a crowrl of 
sun-burned, khaki-clad flying Yankees 
come trooping in to lunch, just in 
from a long flight, too hungry to stop 
to change clothes. In a day the mail- 
plane pilots make anywhere from 
1200 to 1500 miles, eating breakfast 
in Miami and dinner in Haiti, or 
sleeping one night in Para, Brazil, 
and the next in Port of Spain, Trini- 
dad. Passengers who ride these planes 
are up at dawn, and into the air be- 
fore sunrise. Agents supply each with 
a lunch, and reading matter is put 
on the ships. Baggage is limited, but 
careful choice of light wash clothes 
and quick work by seaport laundry 
women afford comfort to travelers. 

Many "Point-to-Point" Passengers 

Mail flies from Buenos Aires to 
Miami in 6% days, and passengers 
may make this same rapid cruise, 
though most of them are "point-to- 
point" riders. 

Exotic scenes mark many stons. 
At Fortaleza, Brazil, men. women, 
nude children. w ; th parrots, monkeys 
and dogs, cluttered the docks and 
beaches as we stopped for gas. Cir- 
cling for pictures, before we landed, 
we saw pigs and goats run into the 
houses, as people ran out. Here and 
there we stopped, for three or four 
days, to make side trips, for we were 
not flying on regular schedule. To 
gtt maps, aerial photos of islands, 
lakes, river mouths, light-houses and 
harbors, we halted, gathering such 
landmark and other data useful to 
seaplane pilots along this great air 
oath. While working out from Para, 
for example, the Geographic Society's 
party, flown by pilot Hawkins, ex- 
plored the islands of Marajao and 
Mexiana in the Amazon delta. From 




Clothes 
for Old 



Kalher un anfhiliuuft iluim 
which we can pfoVC w it h > nur 
own rlolbrw. Pick out Some 
auit or dr?sj* which hang* idly 
in your clOMt Let u« give it 
the continuous sterile filtration 
cleaning treatment, and (hen 
press it with our usual rare — 
you'll he the jud«e of it* new 
life and wear. 



WINTER COATS $1 

(fur trimmed extra) 

MEN'S SUiTS . . $1 
6 NECKTIES . . 75c 
FUR COATS $3.50 up 



WORKS AT MALDEN 



MALden 2000 



GOLDEN BELL 
Cleaners — Dyers 



It/s thrifty to call Golden Bell 



\ f u r\ y-> ■ K I U. S. Pat. Off. 

VIRGIN DIAMONDS 

are more {/ion. a TRADE- NAME 




Dir»ct from th» minat, 
never before individ- 
ually owned or worn, 
Virgin Diamond* may 
be obtained at itandard 
price* th* world over. 



Any reputable Jeweler can offer 
you diamonds of assured beauty 
and quality — but none can dis- 
tinguish those which have passed 
from hand to hand, of unsavory 
past and undesirable associa- 
tions. Today, for the first time 
you can secure Certified VIRGIN 
DIAMONDS— but only through an 

Authoriied Virgin Diamond Dealer 

HENRY EILLAUER 

Square Deal Jeweler 

327 M M.N STREET 
WOBURN 



SALE ON DRESSES 

$16.75 DRESSES FOR $12.75 $10.75 FOR $8.75 

$9.75 FOR $6.95 
House Dresses and Underwear Also on Sale 

The Apparel Shoppe 

2 SALEM STREET, WOBURN TEL. WOB. 0672-K 

Employment Agency— Mrs. A. S. Bovia, Proprietress 



terrain and lakes observed and photo- 
graphed, it now appears that the 
Cayenne-Para lep of this long route 
may be much shortened by flying 
over these islands, safely, instead of 
around them as heretofore. 

Wherever we stopped, the pilots 
are known, just as encineer< and 
brakemen were in the early days of 
western railroading. 

Besides being skilled flyers, many 
of these pilots are good linguists, as 
are also the airplane agents at many 
ports; for confusion of tongues is 
met from Havana to the Argentine. 
We have had Spanish, French, Eng- 



lish, Dutch an l Portuguese to deal 
with! And money! Some say it has 
no home— that it wanders where it 
can earn the best return. But along 
this line, jumping from flag to flag, 
we've found in use dollars, pesos, 
francs, shillings, Danish money in the 
Virgin Islands, guilders in Dutch 
Guiana, francs asain in Cayenne, 
milreis in Brazil. 



Handinapkin Holders, complete with 



paper aapkins. $1 



Refills, 15c. 



The modern way to keep paper nap- 
kins for instant use. At the Star 
Office. 



8 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1930 



'DUNCAN STORES! 



Clearing Away Warehouse Stock Jam 




GARBAGE CANS 



f. ix gr.ilon si:c: made cf 
heavy ?,auge galvanized ircn: 
light fining cover, look at the 
price! 



79c 



ALARM CLOCKS 



"Thrift" make: dependable time- 
keepers, a sure-fire alarm; four 
color finishes. 



79c 



CLOTHES LINE REELS 



"Blue Bird" rigid self-winding reel, 
complete with clothes line; com- 
pact when not used. 



49c 



Putting to rout, with a Cut-Price raid, all odd lots, lagging lines and left- 
overs, accumulated from an unprecedented busy season. 

$ V 

No temporizing— no stretching out the selling. This is a time when the 
public are looking for sensational values in indispensibles. Here they 
are- not plentiful in all lots, as quantities are necessarily limited and we 
cannot promise to meet the sustained demand in all items that these 
lowered prices are sure to arouse. ... , 

Amazing Reductions-Downright Sacrifices 

to make a quick, effectual clearance 




BREAD BOXES 



Where's the house- 
wife who doesn't 
want one of these 
cobred enamel 
containers, w h e n 
price is as low as . 




ELECTRIC TOASTERS 

$ 



Nickel plated; toasts two slices 
at once; intense heating unit. 
Absurdly low prices! 



|.19 



ALLUMINUM SAUCE PANS 

Universally popular and proven dependable "Wear 
Ever"; set of 3 pans, 3 sizes, nested. 



98c 




VACUUM 
BOTTLES 



Aluminum with 
screw cup top; 
keeps li mi l h >l 
or col J, what's 
needed for 
packed lunches 
duri.14 winter. 



69c 



IRONING STAND 

Smooth finished wocd, 
ttrcngly supported; fold- 
ing into compact space ; 
nothing weak about them 
but price! 



$169 



1 



WASTE BASKETS 




All Metal - that makes 
'em durable and clean- 
atle; nicdy 

col ired and 
a t'>uch of 
ornamenta- 
tion, 



• ana Clean- 

29c 



CLOTHES 
BASKETS 

Ti", huge seasoned willow 
Cloches Baskets; woven to 
hold ea:h strand tightl 
Startling value. 



98c 



NUT CRACKERS 



The "Ideal"— cracks so the 
nut meats pop out in whole 
halves, a 50c bargain at 
this price! 



19c 



BREAD KNIVES 



Keen cutting serated edge, 
slices without crumbling; 
colored handles price cut to 



14c 



CANNISTER SETS 



Indispensable for every 
pintry shelf; 4 cannisters of 
four sizes; set complete 



69c 



HUMIDIFIERS 



for place above radiators; 
made of galvanized iron and 
soldered against chance of 
leakage; 5 sections. 



3 ior$ 2 



Advance Showing 

TOYS, GAMES Etc. 

Purposely arranged for your con- 
venience-selections can now be 
made with every advantage of un- 
hurried first choice. 

Purchases will be held for 
future delivery if desired. 



CARVING SETS 




Three pieces: carver, fork and sharp- 
ening steel; stag bone handles: really 
fine sets— heretofore priced $5, all 
this week at 



$3.88 



ORANGE SHELLAC 



Guaranteed 4 pound cut. 
Not the cheap diluted Shellac 
sometimes sold at a low 
price. QUART 



59c 



WOOD TONE 



Eight ounce bottles of cele- 
brated furniture t^ish; 35c 
bottle or if you buy TWO 
BOTTLES PRICE 



36c 



METAL POLISH 



"Signet", one of our fastest 
selling brighteners for all 
metal wares; gritless. ) z pt. 
cans for 



19c 



HOUSE AXES 



"Winchester" wouldn't 
stamp their name on an in- 
ferior article! Bully for split 
ting kindling. 



49c 



Special Notice 

Due to the extreme low prices we 
must exact CASH for all purchases 
made of REDUC2D merchandise, 
during this sale. 

You will greatly assist our delivery system 
if you will thoughtfully take small uacKagts 
with you. 




f or HaHlwaFe 



631 Main St., Melrose 
437 Franklin St., Melrose £L 
435 Broadway, Everett 
204 Pleasant St., Maiden 
369 Main St., Stoneham 
469 Main St., Wakefield 
5 Mt. Vernon St., Winchester 
437 Main St., Woburn 



PUDDING 
STEAMER 



Heavy aluminum; just 
what you'll need for plum 
pudding or brown bread ; 
"Wear Ever" alumil 




anize 




POLISHING WAX 



Kyanize make 1 there's no 
better liquid wax for 
floors and furniture: this 
price gives you a full pint 
;an. 



59c 



WINDOW VENTILATORS 



Wood frame with metal 
center slotted to admit air: 
adjustable in length; ready 
to slip into windows. 



17c 



JUICE EXTRACTORS 



Favorably known "Driver" 
a whirl of the handle and all 
the fruit iuice is extracted; 
surely a VALUE! 



98c 



SXgS. THANKSGIVING TURKEY ^S'S&^SSS^ GIVEN FREE/ 



Duncan Stores Open Every Saturday ~,ening 



irwivv mag imm&m*m 



CROWD SPOILED TOWN TEAM — 
LEXINGTON GAME 

Visitors Forfeited Game Vfter Fight 
in Pinal Quarter 



Tin' Lexington Minuteboys forfeited 
their game with the Winchester town 
Team, 1 0, alter ;i rignt had halted 
play during the final quarter of the 
contest at .Manchester r ield on Arm- 
istice Day afternoon. The crowd 
streamed unto the gridiron after two 
of tne players became mixed up in a 
squabble, and with darkness rapidly 
approaching, the Lexington manager 
decided that Ins hoys hud had enough. 

I'erhaps Ins decision was a wise 
one. '1 lie rabid element of the crowd 
seemed intent upon precipitating 
trouble, and so spoiled for the big per- 
centage of spectators what had pre- 
vious to tne scrap been a nice foot- 
ball game, The trouble between tne 
players could have been quickly ironed 
ivit it the crowd had stayed where it 
belonged— in the stands and aloiitf 
the s.delines. A scrap between play- 
ers m a football game is nut unusual, 
and if the boys are left to themselves, 
is quickly over, Its entirely a dif- 
ferent story when a hundred or so 
rabid fans swarm around the com- 
batants, urging them t,. "knock 'is 
block off." By far the larger part of 
the crowds at football games detest a 
brawl, They go to the fields to see 
football games, not gang fights, ami 
it is too bad that a small minority 
can spoil a good time by starting a 
fight at any pretext. 

Several of the Town Team's games 
have been marred by battles, and the 
playt rs on the club should put a curb 
upon their pugilistic supporters, lest 
the latter spoil the splendid reputa- 
tion wnich the team is winning for 
itself by its tine football playing, 

The holiday scrap might have been 
avoided entirely, had a few 15-yard 
penalties been inflicted at the rirst 
Bigns of roughness early in the Rame. 
Pfom the sidelines, at least, the (fame 
did net seem to be dirty, thouvrh it 
was a rugged bruising battle with 
both 'cams playing a hard same. 

The elevens were very evenly 
matched, and the battle was a corker 
through the three and a half periods 
the boys were left to themselves. 
Winchester had the edge through its 
better passing game which finally re- 
sulted in the only touchdown of the 
battle just before the half time 
whistle. 

Lexington threatened to score 

through the air shortly after the 
start of hostilities. With Watt doinvr 
the rassinir the Minuteboys advanced 
to Winchester's 15-yard line where a 
pass was intercepted by the locals. 
On a spinner play the Lexinptor 
eleven was completely fooled am' 



•\ut.-y" Amico got away, running al- 
most to midfield, Chefalo, "Sam" 
Horn and Amico crashed into Lexing- 
ton territory as the first period came 
to a close. 

Winch ^trr soon found that it could 
do little or nothing with the Minute- 
boy's frontier, and took to the air in 
.in attempt to score. With Amico do- 
ing the passim;' to McNeil and Chefalo 
tin- ball was plugged along until 
Chefalo caught a long pass and was 
hauled down In yards from the Lex- 
ingt m goal. 

Winchester plugged the line for 
four yards, and an offside penalty 
placed the ball on the one-yard line. 
The locals then engaged in a joint de- 
bate which lost them five yards for 
stalling, Lexington took the ball on 
downs and rushed and kicked out of 
dancer. 

The locals would not be denied, and 
still keeping pretty much to the air 
they began to work the ball up the 
tield. Amico was forced out of the 
tranie with injuries, and his place was 
taken by "Jocko" Prue. Lexington 
was failing to hurry the passer and 
Prue was doing some very accurate 
hurling of the pigskin. 

Two long passes, the first to "Livin" 
McNeil and the second to "Punk" 
Cummings, again worked the ball in- 
to scoriner position, and after a short 
pass to McNeil had gone almost to 
th" goal line Prue dropped back and 
shot off a pretty heave out to the 
right which was gathered in by Chefa- 
lo. the latter going over for the score. 
The try for goal failed, and the half 
closed soon after. 

During much of the third quarter 
: the teams fought on even terms, 
though the hall was always in Lex- 
incton territory, due to some nice 
open flelii running by "Five Yards" 
Flaherty of the locals. 

Shortly after the beginning of the 
final period. Lexington held for downs 
rear its goal line ami with Watt and 
Porter d.-inir some pretty running, 
worked the ball up to its 40-yard line. 

Amico had returned to the same 
and at this point, he and Watt be- 
came involved in a mixup. The crowd 
ran onto the tield. and anythinir ap- 
proach'ng football was impossible 
from then on. 

The summary: 
WINCHESTER T T. LEXINGTON 

McNeil, ft' If. Spt'ltman 

le, TrOTiea.no 

Quigley, rt It. J. Phi Icy 

It. Cameron 

Kerrigan, rs... lit, Williams 

Carroll, r* Ik, Silva 

Flrmlnjf. c c... Sherman 

DelGrasso, c e, Lewis 

Tofurl, 1k tk. Savage 

Corbl, Ik tk. Baas 

''apone Ik 

Kronglllo, It rt. Julin 

'V>h.Tty. It rt. Ryan 

McDonnell, le re. MacPhce 

Cummin** le re, L. Dailey 

t. H .rn. le 



qb, Watt 

ill*. Frank!) 

Ihb, .1. porter 

Iht), Casey 

lhb. I. in, I 

rhb, R. Porter 

rhb, Wilson 

rhl>. Psaltls 

fb, Woodward 

fl>. D. Porter 

Score Winchester l. Game forfeited by 
Lexington. Referee Tansey, M. C. I Tim- 
er Murphy, H. C. Linesman O'Connell, 
Winchester, Time 1"» minute periods. 



Amico, «il» 

Klemintr, qb 

S. Horn, rhl 

Prue, fhb 

Haley, Ihb 

Flaherty, Ihb 

Chefalo. fh 



SIX MINUTES IX BUENOS AIRES 



Buenas Aires, wonder city of Ar- 
gentina, and metropolis of the south- 
ern hemisphere, is the subject of the 
following bulletin from the Washing- 
ton, I>. C. headquarters of the Na- 
tional Geographic Society. The bul- 
letin is a communication to the Society 
from Frederick Simpich who recently 
conducted an aerial survey party from 
New York to the Argentine capital. 

Fly 8500 miles south from New- 
York, along new blazed seaplane paths 
that hug the Western Hemisphere, 
writes Mr. Simpich. Turn into the 
vast, muddy mouth of the River Plate 
—in South America— and fly 150 miles 
upstream. There is glittering Buenos 
Aires, one of the most remarkable 
cities ever built. 

No city in the United States is so 
important to us as Buenos Aires is to 
Argentina. It handles four-fifths of 
all Argentina's ttade, and houses 20 
per cent of all the nation's 10,000,000 
inhabitants. All its 2,000.000 people 
are either Europeans, or of European 
descent. This is true of onlv one oth- 
er Latin American city — Montevideo. 

Three times as big as Spain's larg- 
est city, modern Buenas Aires — as ex- 
panded and rebuilt in the last 30 
years — is conspicuous in all the world 
for its matric growth. 

Focus of Argentine Life 

The whole 25, 000-mile railway sys- 
tem of Argentina has its focus here 
—the finest railroads in South Amer- 
ica. No great motor highways radi- 
ate from the city, because the vast 
pampas afford no road-makintr ma- 
terials. But by rail and river Buenos 
Aires handles more than half as much 
freight as the port of New York, and 
the net tonnage of ships calling each 
year is equal to all that passes 
through the Panama Canal. 

Not trade alone makes it great. Its 
social, artistic and political attrac- 
tions rank it amontr the world's most 
dazzling capitals. To it flock the rich, 
the influential, the intelligentsia of 
all Argentina. Our country as a Whole 
would develop faster, said one promi- 
nent banker, if more of our best brains 
would stay in the provinces. 

Yet, although so many land owners 
live in the city, the swift, prodigious 
growth of herds and farming on the 
vast campos is an economic phenome- 



na in this comparatively new country. 
In Europe the Argentine visitor is 
noted among hotels, resorts ami shop 
heeners for the freedom with which 
he spends money. These immense in- 
comes are mostly from the soil. I 
visited one Estancia in Sante Fe 
Province that runs 50,000 cattle, and 
boasts of prize bulls costing $10,000 
each and upwards. There were 25,000 
hogs, 1200 horses, a creamery mak- 
ing duoo pounds of butter daily for 
export to England; a private tele- 
phone system, a rambling chalet set 
in an artificial forest of imported 
trees, swimming pools, tennis courts — 
a princely estate that would make 
even a Texas cattle kinp dumb with 
astonishment. Similar ranches lie near 
Buenos Aires; others are far away, on 
the pampas. Their number, size, and 
money-making organization amazes 
the tourist — with schoolbook memo- 
ries of woodcuts showing a hard-rid- 
ing gaticho swinging a three-balled 
lasso over his head and chasing a 
li nit-horn steer — or an ostrich. 
South America's Beauties in Reach 
Nature is kind to Buenos Aires. Up 
the Parana are the majestic falls of 
Iguazu — and Guayra, solemn and stu- 
pendous, rankinc with Niaeara and 
Victoria in Africa. Up the Andes and 
"ndcr the shadow of Aconcagua — ■ 
highest mountain in the Western 
World — runs a cogwheel railway that 
lift* you in a few hours from green 
plains to Alpine heights and snow- 
dr'fts 20 feet deep — where Argentine 
soldiers train on skis. Winter hotels 
are here now — a new St. Mortiz. And 
there is ancient Cordoha. historic Tu- 
ournan, the famous baths of Rosario. 

And as melons and oranges rush to 
our East from California and Florida, 
so Argentina's fruits flow into Buenos 
Aires. It lives well. Whole train- 
loads of fresh grapes come from the 
famed vineyards of Mendoza — and 
many reach our own markets. New 
Vork is at one end— Rupnos Aires at 
the other — of a busv trade route. Now 
hoth sea and skv ships s^rve it. And 
shins are "Ceaseless shuttles weaving 
the fabric of international oommoTe 
and good will." Mutual trade has 
hreuo-ht Americpn investments to Bue- 
nos \ire«— lotablv in packing honses, 
nublic utilities and hanks. Two Yan- 
kpi enr>oerns alone control morp than 
100 lifM and power units in Argen- 
tina. Here too you see the new- policy 
of r-'-e'tt American corporations ap- 
nliv*. by which now their Argentine 
emrJ 1 >y°ps are encouraged to become 
'trckh^lders. 

"•"o'lth. vitality, she^r pnjovment of 
I 'vine;, thev are the attributes of 
Buenos Aire*. Shinv new motor cars; 
fasr ; n"tin*r. Paris-like shon windows; 
arc lights glaring on well-dressed mid- 
night crowds in brilliant Calle Flori- 



da; cafes, casinos, highpriced restau- 
rants and hotels, all packed with chat- 
tering-, laughing people . . . Endless 
places of amusement, including the 
great Grecian Colon theater; and. on 
billboards, many names familiar to 
Broadway: Titta Schipa, Chaliapin. 
Spinelli, Mistinguette, "Peliculas Par- 
lantes." they call the "talkies." 
Immigrants Swarm to Argentina 
Anil still it grows. Here lands the 
immigrant stream. Bearded men in 
boots, carrying bundles; wondering 
hoys and girls, chattering in strange 
Slav or Initio tongues; bewildered 
mothers, their heads wrapped in 
shawls, hard-handed women bent from 
work, carrying babies and still more 
bundles — you see them all come slowly- 
down gangplanks from European 
ships to stand a bit on the busy wharf 
and stare at Buenos Aires. Argentina 
needs these. She has one-third as much 
land as the United States; hut only as 
many people as live in and about 
New York City. Or about one and 
one-third per square mile, as against 
400 in the British Isles. 



First "Typewriter" 

Christopher Latham Sholes Is known 
us the inventor of the typewriter. His 
first "writing machine" was the end 
of a telegraph key with the letter "w" 
cut in brass. 

Sweets for Indigent 

Rolled sweets are supplied to the 
women in poor law institutions in Eng- 
land to balance 'ho tobacco given to 
the men. The "ration" is tour ounces 
a week. 



Emma J. Prince, Chiropodist, Mas- 
seuse, hours 0-12. l-">, closed Wed- 
nesday afternoons. Tel. Win. 015"). I 
13 Church street. sl2-tf 



Establiiihed l)h 



Postar Furniture 

Manufacturers 

CABINET MAKING 

UPHOLSTERING 

REPAIRING 

594-596 Main Street 
Winchester, Mass. 



TEL. WIN. 0748 



n7-4t 



BYRD PICTURES 
WINCHESTER TOWN HALL 
SATURDAY, DEC. 6 

2 Shows 

3 P. M. — Tickets 10c and 20c 
8 P. M. — Tickets 50c 

Glee Club in Evening 

Tickets of Mrs. Cleaves 
Tel. Win. 1121 

Wadleigh Parent Teacher Association 

nl4-28-di 



Evening EXCLUSION Fares 

IB O STON 

ROUND 32c TRIP 

Tickets good weekday evenings only, on 
trains from Winchester arriving at 
Boston 6 P. M. or Ister; returning 
leaving Hoston the ssme evening not 
later than midnight. 

EVENING EXCURSION TICKETS 
also on aale to Boston and return from 

Woburn 40c 

BUY TICKETS BE KOBE BOARDING 
TRAINS 
Tickets on sale in advance 

BOSTON AND MAINE R. R. 

nH-3t 




CALE RADIATOR FURNITURE S 




THE NEW VOGUE 

Concealing bare, unsightly radiators 
is now the accepted vogue. The 
CALE Metal Products Company man- 
ufacture a series of radiator enclo- 
auies of characteristic New England 
(harm and rraf tmanship. When you 
discover how they protect your walls 
and draperies from discoloration*, 
and how harmoniously they blend 
into your decorative scheme, you will 
not be satisfied until you have cov- 
ered every radiator in your home 
K-timate* cheerfully furnished 
C ILE METAL PRODUCT8 CO. 
50 Sluart St. Boston. 
Hancock M»l 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14 1930 



9 



W. C. T. U. NOTES 



The woman's Christian Temperance 
Union will hold a meeting from 10:30 
till 4 o'clock on Friday, Nov. 21, at 
the home of Mrs. George Arnold, 7 
I>ix terrace. 

Comfort bags will be made for the 
department of Soldiers and Sailors. 

Business meeting and reports of 
State Convention at 2:30. Basket 
lurch. 

Can Itooze be Regulated? 

If it is so desirable that booze 
should have sanction of the law — if it 



is all right and can be controlled and 
regulated as some profess to believe- 
why has it been the target of so many 
prohibitions ? For instance in the sa- 
! loon days, why did the Government 
i place *j many restrictions on it? 
I Why was the sale of liquor forbidden 
j to \ounu men under 21 years of age? 
i Why were women forbidden to enter 
a saloon where men had free access 
to the bar? Why were saloons re- 
quired to be located certain distances 
from schools and churches? Why 
did the railroad companies forbid 
their employees to drink liquor on 



ANNOUNCING A 



Sensational Factory Sale 

Offering Our $20,000 Stock of Upholstered Wicker 
Furniture at Wholesale Prices and Less 

SALE NOW ON 

Unparalleled Values in Fine Reed and Rattan Furniture 
LIVING ROOM SUITES— SUN ROOM SUITES 
INDIVIDUAL PIECES AND NOVELTIES 



Woven Reed 



Stick Reed 



Burnished Rattan 



Till: VERY LATEST STYLES AND FINISHES 
\n Unlimited Choice for the Modest Home or the Finest Estate 
COME DIRECT TO OCR FACTORY 

REAR NO. 3S8 MAIN STREET, WAKEFIELD, MASS. 

Opposite Public Library 



THE JORDAN - WAKEFIELD GO. 



CM MR MAKERS FOR 10 Y EARS 



nl4-2t 



duty or off? Why is it now a crime 
for a person to drive an automobile 
while under the influence of booze? 
Obviously there is only one answer to 
these questions. Liquor, personified 
is a crook. 

Contrast conditions now with those 
prevailing formerly under the licensed, 
so-called "controlled" and "regulated" 
liquor systems when drunkenness was 
rampant. At that time intoxicated 
men were frequently seen staggerins; 
along the streets. They were also 
much in evidence on excursion trains, 
at picnics and other public gatherings, 
creating disorderly scenes and even- 
tually causing a revulsion of senti- 
ment that resulted in the 18th Amend- 
ment. 



The Evening Branch of the Epiph- 
any Church will hold a Rummage 
Sale Wednesday, Nov. 19 at 2 p. m. 
in the Parish House. 



tJie 



BUSY WEEK-END FOR FIREMEN 



there 
corner of 
Governor's 



\or 

\n H I VI i s \ RY 

a tour/ net 

ii in V 




j/ic will remember 
so {lot?/ you Jor^cl 



WINCHESTER CONSERVATORIES 

INCORPORATED 
— Two Stores — 

Main Store and Greenhouses 

186 Cambridge Street 
Phones: Win. 1702, Win. 0fi()9 

ARNOLD SHOP 

1 Common Street Phone Win. 0205 



RADIO 

Only the radio with 

the Golden Voice 




The past week-end proved one of 
the busiest that the local firemen have 
experienced since early fall. 

Their activity commenced at 12:35 
last Friday afternoon when a tele- 
phone cal! came in for a brush fire in 
the rear of Cross street off Washing- 
ton street, li <x 521 sounded at 12:.">1 
p. m. for a irrass and hedge fire at the 
residence of Mr. Harry G, Davy at 23 
Everett avenue. At 12:40 p. m. 
was a crass fire at the 
Washington street and 
avenue. 

At 2:05 i n the afternoon a tele- 
phone message called the firemen to 
put out a brush fire on town land op- 
posite Lebanon street. Mr. L. B. Slo- 
cum of 337 Highland avenue notified 
the Central Station at 3:35 p. m. that 
a I^iSalle coupe was afire at his 
home. 

Saturday's first run came at 7:41 in 
the morning for the most serious fire 
of the week-end. The fire was dis- 
covered in the basement of the house 
at 7oO-7>>2 Main street, owned by Mrs. 
| C. Murray and occupied by Edward 
j F. Maguire and .1. A ('line. The tire 
. apparently bcran in the cellar and 
had trotten a good start before it was 
i discovered. Box 11 was pulled in by 
a passer-by who saw the smoke pour- 
| ing from the basement of the house. 
The fire worked up into the parti- 
tions and through a closet into the 
| hack part of the house. The cellar 
timbers were badly burned and there 
was considerable damage done to the 
! side of the dwelling occupied by Mr. 
| Maguire. Most of th< damage done 
I the main nart of the house was the 
I result of the heavy smoke. The fire- 
men had a stiff two hour fight before 
th< fire was finally extinguished. The 
police were given a busy time hand- 
ling the heavy Saturday morning 
traffic which had to be detoured to 
give the fire fighters a chance to work. 
I While the men were busy at the 
[above fire they were notified that 
• there was a second fire in progress at 
a near-by tailoring establishment. 
Thi-^ proved to be only 
I in the cellar and was 
I guished. 

At 1 1 :23 Saturday morning there 
was a crass fire on Thornton road 
and at 3:4G in the afternoon burning 
brush called the men to Harvard 
stn et. 

A prass fire was reported on the 
Shore mad at 6:27 p. m. and an hour 
later a hay stack on fire took the de- 
partment to Loring avenue. 

Sunday's first call came at 3:01 in 
the afternoon for burning grass in 
the rear of 69 Cambridge street. Tel. 
Box -1?. was sounded at 3:21 p. m. for 
a dump fire at the rear of Clark 
street. 

At 4:55 p. m.. Box 111 came in for 
a grass fire at Dunster lane and Ridge 
street and it was while enroute to 
this fire that Engine 3 collided with 
the automobile driven by Mrs. Emily 
\. Latremore of Lawrence street. 
Box 53 was sounded at 4:59 during 
the excitement occasioned by the col- 
lision at the corner of Bacon and 
Church streets and at 6 o'clock the 
final run of the week-end was made 
in response to an alarm from Box 35 
for a grass fire in the rear of Puffer's 
factory off Swanton street. 



WINCHESTER GIRLS A. A. WON 
FROM LEXINGTON 



Winchester Girls A. A. field hockey 
team reversed its previous defeat at 
the hands of Lexington by winning 
its Boston Association match, 4 — 1. 
from the Lexington eleven last Sat- 
urdaj afternoon on Manchester Field. 

The locals made their best show- 
ing of the season, and were never in 
any danger of defeat. "Kay" Yal- 
lety. Winchester's center forward 
'■ scored the first goal of the afternoon 
from scrimmage midway through 
the first half, to be followed by a 
second goal from the stick of "Kay" 
Carlisle, also shot from scrimmage 
shortly before the half time whistle. 

Capt. "Lou" Skilling of Winches- 
ter scored the third goal of the j^aiiiv. 
after a long carry up the field. Fol- 
lowing the bully. Lexington worked 
the ball up and into a fierce scrim- 
mage in front of the Winchester 
sticKS. Left wing Park of the visit- 
ors finally gut the ball past "Puggy" 
Mt reer for the only Lexington goal 
of the game. 

"Hot" MacKenzie, speedy little 
right wing, gave Winchester its final 
goal as the second half was drawing 
to a close, scoring her K r »al from a 
scrimmage in the Lexington striking 



W INCHESTER WON FROM 
| WATERTOWN 
I Emery Scored First Touchdown on 
Blocked Kick— l.undblad 
Ran for Second 



\v 
I). 

L. 

K. 

M. 
K. 
B. 
c. 
E. 
I). 
M. 
M. 
It. 
A. 
C. 

V 
R 



rcie. 

The summary: 

iNCHESTKK A. A. 
MacKenzie, r» ... 



SkillinK, 



ri. 



Villi, ly, <T 

Cullen, li 

Carliale, lw 

Hendriiik, rhb. . . 
Wiiliunia, rhb 
Morrow, ehb. ... 

Bond, ihb 

Newman, lhl> 

Cutter, rfb 

Bond, rfb 

Dolan, Ifb 

Merci r, v 



I.KXINGTON 

Iw, H. Kurr 

l«, 0. Park 

li. H. Foley 

li. B. Welch 
. L, Wilkinson 
cf, M. Caswidy 
. ii, E. Dalrympie 
. . . rw. A Summer 
...Ihb, H, Neville 

...hi,, li. O'NVil 
..rhb, <i. .loin-,-., n 



.HI 



M McDonald 
. .Ifb, K. Lowe 
.rfb, li. Tcrhuhe 
. .v. A. GalTney 



a pile of rue's 
quickly extin- 



Sr,»iv Winchester I ; Lexington 1. Goals 
illely, Carlisle, SkillinK, MacKenzie, Park, 
•d iv, * Frost and Whitehead, 'rum- 20 



W. EDWARD LAFFERTY 



W. Edward Lafferty of 7s:: Main 
treet died Saturday. Nov. s at his 
| home after a long illness. 

Mr. Lafferty was 29 years ,,1,1 and 
was born in Woburn, which city lu 
made his home until 1924 when lie 
came to Winchester. Until forced t,> 
retire because of ill health he had 
been employed as a tile worker in a 
factory at North Woburn. He is sur- 
vived by his wife, who was Miss El- 
len MeKee of Winchester; by two 
sisters. Miss Margaret F. Lafferty of 
Woburn and Miss M. Catherine Laf- 
ferty of Medford; and by a brother, 
.John M. Lafferty of Chicago, 111. 

The funeral was held from the late 
residence Tuesday morning with a 
high mass of requiem celebrated in 
St. Mary's Church by Rev. Fr, Wil- 
liam ,1. Clarke. Bearers were Wil- 
liam Lagerty of Medford, Robert Me- 
Kee and Arthur Johnson of Winches- 
ter, Owen Murphy of Woburn. John 
Quinn of Arlington and Theodore Mc- 
Carthy of Medford. Interment was 
in Calvary Cemetery. 



Mr. Bowen Tufts of this town has 
been elected a director of the Massa- 
chusetts Real Estate Exchange. Mr. 
Tufts is a member of the Boston firm 
of C. D. Parker & Co. 



Sergt. Thomas F. Cassidy with 
Patrolmen Edward W. O'Connell, 
Henry P. Dompsey, Joseph J. Derro, 
John H. Boyle, John E. Hanlon and 
Charles J. Harrold went to Woburn 
on the holiday forenoon to assist in 
handling the bin: crowd in the Tanning 
City for the parade. 



THE 



satisfy yon! 



NASH 



\Appearance and comfort are notahls advanced 
Vtrfurmance is smoother, more thrilling than ever 



1 



n 



CONSIDER that this new Atwater Kent 
with the Golden Voice is not the product 
of a year or two years' experience hut the 
result of eight years of setting the pace for the 
whole industry. 

Sit at the Quick-Vision Dial and tune in vour 
favorite station swiftly, easily, accurately. 
Let the Golden Voice convince you. Test it 
on high notes, on low notes. Turn it up to 
tull volume or down to a mere whisper. 
Test it on distant and nearby stations see 
how Perfected Tone Control makes vou 
master of the program Lmphasire the bass 
or treble as you choose. Four definite tone 
shading!— always the Golden Voice. 

Remember, you are investing not merely for 
a month or a year, but for manv years. See 
and hear the new Atwater Kent today. 





Lowbov, SI 19. Other hc.iuti- 
ful model., including Radii* 
Phonograph co nvb i n a 1 1 o n, 
from St:S lo $1>»S. Pr ces 
less tubei. 



The Fi<ht-90— Finest Motorinf 
Money Can Buy — S1565 



Everywhere you go, you will hear glowing trib- 
utes to the new Nash. Some refer to the car's 
smooth, Hashing speed and delightful ease of 
control. Others stress its finer beauty and 
luxury. All marvel at the wholly unexampled 
value. Iieyond these tributes, there is the 
unmistakable fact that every one who rides in 
or drives the new Nash desires to own it. 
demonstration will make you, too, one of the 
new thousands now turning to the new Nash. 



J. H. BURKE CO. rXiyXKmft 221 Columbus Ave., Boston 



WE CAN SERVE YOU BETTER 



S. S. McNEILLY CO. 

YOUR LOCAL DEALER 

547 Main Street, Winchester 

RADIO SERVICE ON ALL MAKES 



Six-6o Series 
6-Cyl., ii4 I 4 " Wheelbaae 

$795 to $845 

Eight-70 Series 



Kight-80 Series 
8-CvL, 1 21" Wheelba* 

$1245 to $1375 



A N F. W 



Eight-70 Series F.igkt-90 Series 

8-C\:., 1 i6< 4 " Wheelbaae 8-CyL, 124* and 133* WheelbtM 

$945 to $995 $1565 to $2025 

{PritU F 0. B. Fartenti) 

D E A L FOR TODAY'S DOLLAR 



Federal Motor Car Co. 



526-528 Main Street 



Winchester, Mass. 



u A u ffttiy improved Watertown 
iligh School football team put up a 
great fight against Winchester last 
baturdaj afternoon, holding the locals 
to a pan- of touchdowns in the Mystic 
Valley League engagement between 
the two schools ,.ii Victory Field, Wa- 
tertown. 

The game was pretty much an even 
thing. Winchester, wholly lacking in 
light, couldn't make its offense click 
at all against the hard charging Wa- 
tertown boys, and seemed verv content 
to take things easily after the first 
touchdown. The locals had the "we- 
ean-do-it-any-time-we-want-to" atti- 
tude against Watertown, despite the 
fact that during much of the game 
they were actually outplayed by the 
scrappy Crimsc n u am. 

Toward the end of the game Wat. r- 
town put on an offense of its own. and 
had the ball inches from the Win- 
chester goal when the tinal whistle 
sounded. I Oe Arsenal buys showed a 
Larking haltback in Lane and a good 
tackle hi Katttgan. The whole Crim- 
bi n line playe i well and had the jump 
on the half-hearted Winchester play- 
ers, time and again sifting through to 
stop the lm-al i.a.ks in their tracks. 
Captain Emery and Wilmer Smith 
with Lundblad, DiMinico and Mobbs 
kept the Winchester team from dying 
altogether. 

Watertown kicked off to start the 
game, and Winchester's running at- 
tack was .-lopped (ieaii by the combina- 
tion of muddy ground and charging 
Watertown tacklers. Lee kicked t • 
the Watertown 30-yard line and on the 
first play Lane got away at end for a 
first down on the 40-yard marker. 
Winchester braced and Watertown 
was forced to kick. Emery was 
through very fast to block the punt 
and picking up the leather, ran 2'> 
yards for the score, aided by some, 
very effective cleaning out by "Stutz" 
DiMinico, 

I ee kicked the goal from placement, 
and from then until the end of the 
quarter H was even Stephen, neither 
•■lull being aide to gain consistently. 
Just before the whistle Lane grabbed 
a :;-J yard pass on Winchester's 40 
yard line, but Winchester braced 
again and Watertown kicked to Hickey 
at Winchester's 10-yard line. 

The second quartet' was only a min- 
ute or so old at this point and Win- 
chester staited an offi nsive drive that 
to,.!, the 1ml! to midfield, \\ it irtuwn 
stopped three attempts t , advance the 
hall and Lee kicked to the Water! iwtl 
20-yard line. Watertown, on gome ef- 
fective running by Lane, advanced the 
hall to its 34-yard line, and there an 
offside penalty against Winchester 
placed tile hall on the "'.'-yard marker. 
t»n the next rush Watertown fumbled 
and Winchester recovered at the do- 
yard sttipe. Lee got •"> yards at tackle 
and Wilmer Smith ran to a first down 
on the 20-yard line around right end 
as the halt elided. 

Starting the second half. Water- 
town kicked to "Dan" Smith who ran 
the hall to the 38-yard line. With 
Lee, Lundblad and Smith alternating 
in carrying the hall, Winchester 
rushed to the Watertown 15-yard line 
where on fourth down a pass was 
partially blocked and Watertown took 
the hall at its own 23-yard marker. 
Shortly before the beginning of the 
last fpuartcr Watertown completed a 
long forward pass on Winchester's 
40-yard line. Two rushes and the re- 
covery of a fumble gave the Crimson 
the ball on Winchester's 30-yard line. 

Here the locals hurried a pass which 
went awry and "Stutz" DiMinico was 
in fast to nail the passer on a second 
attempt at the Winchester 40-yarcf 
line, giving the lrcals the ball. Smith 
and Lundblad advanced the ball to 
midfield as the quarter ended. 

Smith passed to Lee for 22 yards 
to start the final period, hut a short 
pass lost a foot. Lundblad passed to 
Smith for '.) yards and Wil mer made 
it first down on Watertown's 15-yard 
line. On the next rush Lundblad got 
away off his own right tackle, and 
running beh'nd nice interference went 
to the L r < a| line where hf dove over 
for the score. A pass for the extra 
point failed. 

Soon after the kickoff "Dan" Smith 
intercepted a Watertown pass at the 
Crimson's 48-yard line, but Winches- 
ter fumbled and Watertown recovered 
at Watertown's 42-yard mark. Then 
with the assistance of a couple of 
penalties Watertown worked the ball 
along to Winchester's 28- yard line. 
Here MeXamara crashed tackle for n 
first down on the 18-yard line and on 
the next play, a clever lateral, Lane 
reached the fj-yard marker. 

The Watertown stands were im- 
nloring the team to score, and when 
I nne got two yards at center the 
ero« - d went "'ild, Goueh ndd'd two 
"ards at tackle hut the Watertown 
boy - wasted nrerious time in talking 
thine* over in the huddle and the 
whist'o blew before another play 
coi'ld b run. 

Tbn summary: 

W l NCHESTER WATERTOWN 
IS^nhhK, If re, Ross 

Di \pi,rlB If 

fotpaa, It rt. PappaH 

Flaherty. Ik rte. Wolopojtan 

Emery, <■ <'. Cnnn<>n« 

<•. Shean 

Amhro«p. r«r. Iv'. Androtkl 

Procopio, ri? 

D Smith, rt It. Rattitran 

DiMinico. re le, Planidori 

Hickey, qh qb, MrNarrmra 

Rnliin»on, ihb rhb. Ron* 

l.undblad, Ihb 

I "Rov. rhh Ihb. I.ane 

W. Smith, rhb 

fb fb, ririusfh 

Knowlton, fh 

Ser.r- Winrh'ster 18, ToilchdowtM Kmcry, 

r.undhlad. Point fnr goal after touchdown 
Lee. hy placement. Referee W. .1 Murphy, 
fmnire H. Kower. Linesman W .1. Dooley. 
Time ten minute periods. 

M \RRL\GE INTENTIONS 

Marriage intention- have been 
filed with the Town Clerk as follows: 

Joseph William Howard of 34 Al- 
len road and Mary Christina Dinneen 
of 4"> Swanton street. 

Daniel Angus Murray of 8 Broad- 
way. Stuneham and Margaret Win- 
nifred Callahan of 188 Washington 
street. 

William Doherty of 77 Green street 
Charlestown and Alice McDevitt of 
12 Grove street. 



10 



THE WINCHESTER. MASS. STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER W, 1930 





I 



G R A N A D A ATTR AC TION S 



CALUMET CLUB NOTES 



The winners of ihe IsdieB 1 after- 
noon bowling party last Friday were 



FORTNIGHTLY NOTES 



a follows 

Highest -ink')*? 



string— Mrs. Glen Brown- 



At the regular meeting of the club 
on Mon. lay, Skv. 3, Mrs. Mabelle H. 
Win ship, fir.-t vice-president, was in 
the chair, nwir.-r to the very serious 
illness «.f the sister of the president, 
Mrs, < 'hristine E. Hayden. 

The American Home Committee, 
Mrs. Amy Grant, chairman, gave a 



program to th>- mem- 
Fortnightly and their 
consisted of a Fashion 
by Mi-s Dorothy Dorr of 
& Co., of Boston, in which 
of mannequins wen- most 
efficiently and delightfully taken by 
Indies belonging to the club. 

Miss Dorr called our attention to 
the length of gowns, saying that the 



very pleasin 
bers of the 
friends. It 
Show put on 
1 handler 

I lie place 



distance from the ground 
irt dress is 14 inches, a 
ternoon gown, five or six 
informal evening gown or 
three inches, and a for- 
u 



: emulation 
for a .spi 
formal af 
inches, an 
dinner dres 

mal dinner or evening gown not used 
in dancing should sweep the ground. 
Although these are safe and general 
rules, she advised our being sufficient- 
ly individual to wear a length that is 
becoming to our figures. 

Over 30 gowns were then displayed, 
being in each case shown with appt 



Highest tingle string with handicai»--Mra 
Albert Allen. ■". ami JO 105. 

Highest t ml Mr-. Warren 0>x. ITT. 

JiigM..>t t-.tai with handicap— Mr». Barker 
1 ano IPS. 

The next ladies' afternoon of bowl- 
ing will take place on Tuesday, Nov. 
1*. beginning at 2:30 o'clock. 

The annual Thanksgiving turkey 
roll is to be held at the club next Sat- 
urday afternoon and evening. Mem- 
bers are urged to visit the club and 
take their bird home with them. 

Calumet now is in first place in tin 
Mystic Valley League. On Monday 
evening it took the Middlesex Club of 
Arlington into camp '.' to o", winning 
seven of the eight bowling points and 
two of the three card points. The 
billiard- and pool went to Middlesex. 

The scores were as follow.-: 
( iilumel >h Middlesex 



in iate ac 
neckpiece 



hats, fur 
bags, uni 
proper coats 



es such a: 
Iry, gloves 
com si . 

mg these latter IVr- 
broadtail, and squh 
as t r 

for 

k m 



mg. The 
port, and 
in colors, 
wear were fa- 
may be short 
are m keeping 
may 



dress and 



ssori 

jewe 
I of 

or wrap-. Aim 
sian lamb, lapin 
re I were prominent 
gorgeous new tweeds 
hroa Iclot h, either blai 
for more formal day 
vored. EvenJjt\g wrap 
<.r long, provided they 
with the lines of th 
be in matching or contrasting colors. 
One most interest ing detail show n was 
in the use of large patch pocket- whol- 
ly of Persian lamb. 

Anion-- the gowns, the most out- 
. landing points were those of fullness, 
sometimes in pleat- and sometimes in 
circular flounce- and godets, bat al- 
ilaeed low. an I the refreshing 
of sleeves and sleeve trim- 
There v. ere long am! short 
trimmed above the elbow and 
it. tight sleeves and largi 



ways | 
variet y 
mings. 
sleeves 
below 

gracefully draped ones, embroidered 
ami frilled, cuffed a id open. It seems 
(hat t'lis year one can have sleeves 
to suit them no matte: how temptra- 
mental one may be. 

The soft n?w tweeds for sport wear 
were m st appealing, especially when 
I rim nu 1 with fur. an I here il must he 
km'Wi that the fur on all pieces of the 
same costume must be the same va- 
ii, tv to I really smart. Sunray treat- 
ment in nailhead decoration was most 
strikii'f. and cowl necks may appear 
either in back or front. The Russian 
influence was plainly seen in the fre 
traent use of the three-quarter length 
tunic in all daytime costumes. Loung- 
ing robes and pajamas were in very 
lovely c.dors ami combinations, one 
particularly good looking pair in the 
new color, Bittersweet. Beauty of 
material and intricacy of lino made 
the pageant of evening gowns a gor- 
geous and fitting ending. 

Mrs. Nancy l>. Alexander furnished 
the soft and' pleasant music for the 
parade of the models, Mrs. Grace !'.. 
Ascltino. Mrs. Helen T. Howe. Mrs. 
Sarah de Rochemont, Mrs. Mabel IL 
Cage. Mrs. Carolyn 1>. Gilnatric, Mrs. 
Martha W. KeHev, Mrs. Winifrede S. 
Meyer, Mrs. Ednah F. Miller, Mrs 
Anne I. Sargent and Mrs. Gretehen II 
West. 





CALUMET ■ 


1 1 






H. Purrinirton 1 15 






3 5 8 


Roomier .. 






99 


262 


N Piiringti 


in' ... ,7.110 


112 


90 




McOratn . . 


:p- 


B3 


109 




HiKieina ■ 


12:1 


111 


-1 








491 


5:ia 


1563 




MIDDLESEX 


1 1 1 






.1. Donnelly 


105 


102 


BQ 




P, Donnelly 






88 




Twitchell . . 


*.','..'.'.'. 102 


lot 


9:1 




R. Keating 


1)2 


'..6 


109 


297 


II. Cook .. 


H2 


96 


108 






l>-.( 


1-1 


4X8 


1458 




CALUM ET 








Blanchard 


105 


"iJI 


96 




MrCurthy . 


iiT 






271 


Priest .... 


117 


-1 


9:1 


27 1 


Holbrook . 


PIT 




87 


2T4 


Hlldroth ■ . 


89 


911 


91 


273 




495 


1 


115 


hit 




MIDDLESEX 


■ J 1 








T'', 


99 


9C 


2T1 


O'rUrn 


SN 


7- 


»:i 




MacDonnld 


64 


-1 


106 


2 SO 


Carver ■ • . 


106 


91 


ST 






!>1 


1 23 


95 






421 


472 


172 


1868 


Calumet 






Middlesex 




Straight Pool 






Batters . . 


.".(i Adams . . 








Cowboy Pool 






Carleton • • 


197 Swift ... 




2o 1 




1 I I Balkline Rilliarda 






Sibley . . . . 


tut Broughton 




150 


Three Cushion Milliards 






Reynolds 


26 Gri 


pse . . . 




. 30 




Cards 








Barry and 


W. 


.1. Ready anil 


Smith . 


Bits f 


;. C. Hildreth 


. 51)0 


Kelley and 


1! 


V. Til 


ion Rnd 


Pitman 


620 ( 


i. O. Sinclair 




Kellej and 


w. 


.1 K. 1 


dy an 


1 


Pitman 


511 1 


:. c. 11 


Idreth 


. :!9T 


Barry and 


II 


V. Ti 


.on a 


1,1 


Smith . . 


485 < 


;. i). s 




. :i"4 



"Her Wedding Night." revealing 
the amusing and romantic adventures 
of a red-haired movie .star who tries 
to escape the men, i.s Clara Bow's 
new laugh and love hit which will 
head the double feature program the 
big Granada Theater in Maiden will be 
for seven days starting next Satur- 
day. "Her Wedding Night,' is an 
Avery Hopwood farce, with a succes- 
sion of comedy situations that bubble 
and frothy in rapid crescendo to an 
exciting and thrilling climax. It is 
a new type of vehicle for the "it" 
girl, being altogether farce with little 
if any serious drama. Ilalph Forbes 
plays the romantic lead with Charles 
Ruggies and "Skeets" Gallagher 
heading the comedy business. 

Richard Arlen in his new picture, 
"The Santa Fe Trail" will be the sec- 
ond attraction on th( program which 
opens at the Grar.ada on Saturday. 
This picture is an adaption of Hal 
• '. Everts widely read novel "Span- 
ish Acus." Rosita Moreno, former 
musical c< medy favorite and vaude- 
ville headline!', is Mr. Arlen's leading 
lady in this stirring story. 

'*Mont« Carlo." with beautiful 
Jeanette MacDonald and ".lack" 
Buchar in as the featured players, 
heads (lie pro-jrarr which concludes 
its run at ...c Canada >•. Friday. 



ON (H E AN VOYAGES 



ALBERT EUGENE AYER 



Albert Eugene Ayer, a resident of 
Winchester for nearlv three-quarters 
of a century, died Friday morning. 
Nov T, in the Winchester Hospital af- 
ter a week's illness. He was 78 years 

° Mr \v.o was the son of Albert and 
Caroline (Stiles) Ayer. and was born 
in Charlestown. When seven years ot 
nge he came with his parent- to Win- 
chester, and had since ma le his home 
lu re, attending the Winchester school- 
end takiivr an active interest in com- 
munity aflfairs, 

As a voting man he entered the ex- 
press business and hit -r was engaged 
in the ftsh business in Winchester. He 
was for many years a member of the 
Kite Department, having been a mem- 
ber of the Hoard of Engineers, clerk, 
and chief of the department 111 1 
He numbered among the oldest mem- 
bers of William Parkman Lodge of 
Masons. 

In 1875 he married Miss Addie 
Whitney of Winchester, who died in 
to-; Surviving are ft'e daughters. 
Mrs Norman Schadt of Tujunga, Cal.; 
Mrs William Hyde of Arlington, Mrs. 
Walter Senior of Medway. Mrs. Les- 
ter l ane of Hingham and Miss Rachel 
Aver of Hull. A s.-n. Luther Ayer 
of Plainfield, N. .1.. also survives with 
12 grandchildren. 

Representatives of William Park- 
man 1 o.lge attended the funeral serv- 
ices which were held on last Sunday 
afternoon at the late residence. 11 
Sanborn street, with the Rev. George 
Hale Reed, minister of the Unitarian 
Church officiating. 

Bearers were Samuel S. Symmes, 
Chester Butterworth, Edward H. Ken- 
erson. all of Winchester, and Amasa 
Harrington of Arlington. During the 
services Kenneth McLeod sang two 
favorite hvmns. "Abide With Me and 
"Rock of Ages." Interment was m 
Wildwood Cemetery. 



Calumel will meet the Maiden Club 
next Tuesday evening. Nov. 18, and a 
good turn-out is requested of mem- 
bers and friends, as these matches 
promise to be particularly interest- 
ing. 

This Saturday evening. Nov. 15, 
tin re will be moving pictures at the 
club. The usual Saturday night 
lunch will be served after the enter- 
tainment. 

Calumet will hold its customary 
New Year's party this season. Mem- 
bers and thei.- friends should make 
no plans for this date until they 
learn of the plans made for this furi- 
ously full evening of fun and frolic 
for all. Reservations can be made 
now. 

WINCHESTER BOAT CLUB 



Through an arrangement with the 
Calumet Club it is to be possible to 
run dances there, under the auspices 
of the Winchester Boat Club, but 
jointly with the Calumet Club. 

It has always seemed unfortunate 
that the dance season at the Boat 
Club was so short, and now the op- 
portunity has arisen for a continua- 
tion of those dances right through 
the winter. 

The success of these dances will of 
course depend on the support ac- 
corded them. It is planned to run 
them twice a month. The charge is 
very reasonable. A suggestion is for 
members to bring other couples with 
them who are not necessarily mem- 
bus, thus making it more sociable 
for everyone. Young and old are all 
welcome and our aim is to give every- 
one a pleasant evening. 

The first dance is scheduled for 
Friday evening, Nov. 21. Ix>t us try 
to make these sort of community af- 
fairs and something to be looked for- 
ward to. 

Now for a good turnout the first 
night, Nov. 121. 



MYSTIC THEATRE 

"All Quiet on the Western Front." 
a stupendous, graphic and truthful 
presentation on the screen of Fric 
Remarque's sensational book, will 
open a seven day engagement at the 
Mystic Theater in Maiden on Satur- 
day and also Sunday. Remarque's 
book, regarded as the greatest hu- 
man document of the war, has broken 
all publishing records and has been 
translated into almost every lang- 
uage. No story ever pictured has 
had as many readers. The battle 
scenes of "All Quiet." in which more 
than 2000 soldiers, war veterans of 
all nationalities, participated are the 
most spectacular and yet the most 
genuine ever pictured. The cast is 
headed by Few Ayers, Louis Wol- 
heini, Slim Summervil'.e. Yola D'Av- 
ril. Russell Gleason, and Raymond 
Griffith. 

"The King of Jazz" with Paul 
Whiteman and his famous band heads 
the double bill which closes its run 
at the Mystic on Friday. This all- 
color picture is a feast of mirth and 
melody. Rin-Tin-Tin in "The Man 
Hunter is the second attraction on 
the current bill. 



Americana •"Cold and Sour" 

The average AmerV-an eats 23 pints 
of ice crenm and 25 pickles in a year. 
Perhaps that's what makes him such 
a cold, sour proposition.— Roanoke 
Times. 



True Delight 

The most fascinating thing In the 
world is a winding road. It forever 
holds a hint of mystery, a promise 
of adventure, a sense of freedom.— 
American Magazine. 



Locust Pest 

The 17-year locust is about one Inch 
long when foil grown and is marked 
with black and yellow. 



r«<tjr International Bridge 

More than 2.000,000 persons pass 
over the bridge between Kajle Pass, 
Texas, and IMedras Negras, Mexico, 
each year. 



TO COMBAT YOUTHFUL "REDS" 



Mrs. Archibald Jordan of Winches- 
ti r, State chairman of the national 
defense of the D. A. It., was the prin- 
cipal speaker at a inciting (if the 
State Director of the Children of the 
American Revolution and the presi- 
dents of the C. A. R., held Monday 
morning in the committee room of the 
Old Colony Trust Company in Boston. 
I he meeting was called with a view 
of combatting the activities of the 
"Young Pioneers of America." a,- 1 
lei ed to be a youthful "Red" organiza- 
tion, through the Incerased activity of 
th< Children of the American Revolu- 
tion o iiich was founded '■•'> years ago 
and which has 26 societies in Massa- 
chusetts. Mis. .Jordan stated that 
everywhere the activity of Commu- 
nists and Reds is being carried on un- 
der the ve:y eyes of patriotic parents 
who seem supremely indifferent to the 
danger to which their progeny is be- 
ing exposed. It has been so difficult 
to arouse parents to a realization thai 
th - danger is existing in their own 
neighborhoods and schools that it has 
been deemed wise to organize the 
youngsters through the C A. II. to 
combat the activities of the "Young 
Pioneei s ol America." 

UNIVERSITY THEATRE 

Among the featured players in 
••Her Man" which comes to the Uni- 
versity for four days starting Sun- 
day, are Helen Twelvetrees, Marjorie 
Rambeau, Phillips Holmes. James 
Gleason, Ricardo Cortez, Franklyn 
Pangborn and Thelma Todd. The 
scenes of the pictures are located on 
the waterfront and gilded den- of 
vice in Havana. There is drama and 
swift-moving action, with an enjoya- 
ble mixture of relishable comedy. 

"Queen High." the companion fea- 
ture, was originally a Schwab and 
Mandel musicomedy smash-hit in 
New York. In its audible form it re- 
tains all the sure-fire laughs and all 
the original wit of the basic piece, 
"A Pair of Sixes." Its cast includes 
Charles Ruggies, Ginger Rogers, 
Stanley Smith and Frank Morgan. 

One' of the world's greatest ro- 
mances is the basis for the action in 
Norma Talmadge's newest picture, 
"Du Harry, Woman of Passion" which 
comes Thursday for the last three 
davs of the week. The plot concerns 
the heart adventures of the siren who 
risked power and a king's patronage 
for the love of a common soldier. A 
brilliant cast appears in the picture 
with Miss Talmadge. 

The largest group of comedy play- 
ers gathered into the cast of a mu- 
sical talkie appear in "Bright Lights 
the all-technicolor companion feature. 
It includes such aide laugh getters as 
Frank Fay, Daphne Pollard, "Tom" 
Dugan, Frank Mcllugh and "Eddie" 
Nugent. Dorothy Mackaill, erstwhile 
comedienne, but in a dramatic role in 
"Bright Lights." Noah Beery. James 
Murray and Philip Strange, hold up 
the melodramatic side of this unusual 
picture. 



Of late there seems to have been a \ 
regular epidemic of "almost" ocean 
voyages. We say almost because their 
chief object seems to be to get some 
old "crate" of a boat or some "trick" 
rig, tie up at some prominent munici- 
pal wharf and then invite the news- 
papers and their attendant photogra- 
phers to come and interview the intre- 
pid sailors. Tall statements are made 
about the long days at sea to come, the 
terrific storms to be encountered and 
finally the strange lands ti. be visited. 
The result is, as usual, a lot of news- 
paper twaddle, a few pictures and the 
mariners find themselves famou. — or 
almost so. 

The next move is to find that the 
alleged boat is not suited for the ocean 
voyage or that something has gone 
wrong with tin financing and then — 
oblivion. Another "ocean" voyage has 
gone wrong. 

Of course, there are those who have 
really done the trick. Mating back to 
the days of "The Old Man" and h:s 
voyages in Detroit and in Sea Bird 
down through countless others. Slo- 
cum, Gerhault, Pidgeon and other deep 
ea sailors who really sailed the seas. 
These men we give ci edit to, but we 
can't abide those publicity seekers who 
want all their press notices first and 
then do nothing. There have been too 
many of them lately and they have 
hurt the real sailors and have caused 
many of us to lose faith in legitimate 
enterprises, 

Probably one of the most outstand- 
ing examples of a man who has really 
dene something is our young friend 
William Albeit Robinson and his hus- 
ky little ketch, the Svaap. 

Here is a totally un-press-agented 
affair, the story of which has been go- 
ing on quietly in this magazine for 
something around two years, Robin- 
son has really done things and at pres- 
ent is some ll.iioo niib s from his 
starting point and so far as we can 
ascertain, he is still going strong with 
a stout little ship, a good crew, con- 
sisting of one man. a camera and his 
trusty typewriter. Robinson has gone 
at his j'.b in a leisurely and thorough 
manner. He has visited the isles that 
are usually skipped entirely by yachts- 
men-voyagers. He lakes pains 
point out the navigational diffi 
the troubles with the pilot hoe 
local dangers that will 
value to those wh > follow 



Farther up the line we crossed a 
small stream running among cacao- 
covered hills. Long chutes made of 
boards ran down the hillsides to the 
water's edge. Down these chutes na- 
tives were sliding fresh cacao beans, 
which emptied into waiting dugout 
canoes. Although cacao has been 
grown here for so long, the methods 
of harvesting it are still primitive; 
for lf> l _jr is cheap. 

White nun tint? life here bard, be- 
cause of so manv i.isects, and malaria. 
Bugs are a plague. I saw a horned 



tumble-bug more than seven inches 
long — larger than many kinds of 
biros. And there were snails that 

I must have weighed half a pound, and 
there was the fer de lance, and other 
bad snakes. 

For days I see only native work- 
men, an Fnglish superintendent told 
me. The natives' language is quickly 
learned — they use only about 400 

.word.-, a blend of Portuguese. Indian, 
and African words imported by 
slaves. 



STANLEY'S WiCKER FURNITURE 

Made to Order in All Sizes 

WOOD BASKETS. FOOT RESTS. PLANT STANDS. WINDOW 
BASKETS AT REASONABLE PRICES 

Repairing Chairs and Baby Carriages 

9 C 



East Arlington 

n7-2t« 



48 Massachusetts Avenue. Rear 



Money to Loan 



in Boston 
and Yicinty 



AT 



On one and two-family houses preferred. Owner 
and occupant preferred. Applications now being 
taken for loans — not over $8000 to one borrower. 
Money advanced to build. Call personally with 

Deed. 



6% 



MERCHANT'S Co operative Bank 

24 School Street, Boston, Mass. 

Assets over §30,000,000 



o21-13l 



Hi- • 



to 

ulties, 
. books and 
ie of great 
his courses. 

He is truly making a real job of his 
voyage and his story is easily the most 
fascinating 'round the world cruise 
that has ever appeared in print, lie 
is ivt prone to exaggerate, vet he tells 
of the interesting ports and islands in 
a simnle, straightforward manner that 
contains considerable charm 
.-tones are well written and concise 
and are well worth reading, with then- 
wealth of detail and interest. 

We suppose that by the tone the 
Svaap gets around to the Atlanta- 
Ocean again, the newspapers will be- 
pin to take notice of her and by the 
time Robinson gets to New York the 
Mayor's Welcoming Committee will be 
on the job. It's (piite true that, some 
fuss and feathers should be made oyer 
this rather bashful and unassuming 
voung man— [The Rudder. 



T. F. Kanrsefick 

Roofing and Metal Work 
of AH Kinds 

Office at A. Miles Holbrook's 
24 CHURCH STREET TEL. WIN. 1250 



f U -tf 




LIFE IN 



TH E 
OF 



CACAO 
BRAZiii, 



OUNTRY 



In the mouth of 
river we anchore 



BUILDING PERMITS GRANTED 



The Building Commissioner has is- 
sued permits for week ending Thurs- 
day, Nov. <). as follows: 

Francis MacNeil, Somerville— new 
dwelling on lot at 39A Wildwood 
street. 

A. E. Northrop, Arlington — new- 
dwelling on lot at 19 Ledyard road. 

J. Waldo Bond. Winchester — new 
garage on lot at 14 Mason street. 

Herbert I'etrie, Winchester— recover 
roof and make alterations Jo store 
building corner Main and Thompson 
streets. 

Charles O. Anderson. Winchester — 
replace front piazza on dwelling at 36 
Grove place. 

Something Wrong 

A new system of memory training 
was being taught in a village school, 
and the teacher was becoming en- 
| thushistie. 

"For Instance," he said, "supposing 
I you want to remember the name of 
| a poet — Bobby Burns. Fix in your 
i mind's eye a picture of a policeman in 
| flames. See— Bobby Burns?" 
i "Yes, I see." said a bright pupil. 
I "But how is anyone to know it does 
not represent Robert Browning?" 



Anti-JewUh Outbreak! 

"Pogrom" Is a Russian word mean- 
ing devastation and was applied to 
anti-Jewish riots in Hussia. The first 
pogroms took place In 1881 and were 
the direct cause of the first wave of 
Busslan-Jewish emigration to America. 



Thinking and Speaking 

"To think quickly." said Hi Ho, the 
sage of Chinatown, "is valuable. To 
spenk slowly Is more so."— Washing- 
ton Star. 



i crocodile-infested 
our seaplane and 
went ashore in the palm-fringed little 
town of Uheos, Bn/.d writes Freder- 
ick Simpich. National Geographic So- 
ciety correspondent with the seaplane i 
party which is surveying routes from 
Washington to Buenos Aires. Ilhoes 
lives on chocolate beans, or cacao. 
One-seventh of the world's crop moves 
from here, and five men managed the 
giant industry. 

Riding in a gasoline sp<ed car. with 
the railway manager, we rattled out 
over the 50-mile toy line which wan- 
ders into the jungle. 

From the forest whizzed a sting- 
ing bug, and bit our driver on the 
nose. If we weren't here, he would 
probably take a crocodile tooth from 
his pocket and rub his nose with it, 
said our host. That is the popular 
cure here for snake bites and other 
poisons. We passed a new-made 
grave with flowers on it. A man 
killed by a crocodile had just been 
buried. 

Dogs are the crocodiles favorite 
dish. When a village dog ventures 
near the river bank at night and 
barks, the crocodiles gather. 

In the state of Bahia are about 
80,000,000 cacao trees; this fruit has 
been grown here for about 1">() years, 
and the tiny railway serves the heart 
of the great cacao region. It hauls 
more tons of freight per mile than 
any other line in South America. 

Leaving the coastal plain and en- 
tering the foothills, one sees the cacao 
plantations. We walked in the shaded 
groves. Among bigger, protecting 
trees the small cacao trees are planted 
thus sheltered from sun and wind. I 
twisted off a green fruit, broke it open 
and tasted the whitish seeds; the flav- j 
,„• was like watermelon. Barefoot 
men and women split the pods, empty ; 
the seeds on a wide platform, and 
tread them free of pulp and pith. 
They call this "Dancing the facao. 

The seeds are dried by stirring 
them in a bi K flat bin. A wide roof, 
set on wheels, is at hand, to be hastily 
hauled over the bin if it rams. Turn- i 
ing a dark brown when dried, and 
tasting plainly of unsweetened choco- 
late when ripe, the beans are packed 
in bags and sent to Europe and the 
United States. In 30 years Bahia s 
expS has risen from 150.000 to 
1 ''OO.OOO bags a year. Brazil herself 
drinks very little chocolate— but much j 

coffee. , liT n _ „ ' 

Near a station named "Lava Pes, 
or "Wash Your Feet." we stopped to 
watch a long file of umbrella ants. 
Each carried a leaf, as if it were an 
umbrella. Many ants were up in a 
biting off bits of leaf and drop- i 
them to other ants waiting on 
the e-round. This line of marching 
ants is often a mile or more long. The 
rnta carry the leaves to their under- | 
ground home, and store them. On 
The leaves a fungus forms, and this 
the insects eat. 

Under a shed nearby we saw four 
men. with machete.,, scraping a wild 
pig they had shot. 



POTATO 
CHIPS 



MAX BY 

NEWTON PURE TOOD CO. 

AWeuRNbALI. MASI. 



i =3 



For Luncheon, Bridge and 
Supper Parties 

Ask for the Chips in the Yellow Box 




| tree. 
! ping 



MILK CHART FOR MONTH OF SEPTEMBER 19.10 


Published by the Winchester Board of Health 




The bacteria count in this chart gives the number of bacteria found in 
one c. c. taken from the center of the sample after it had been well shaken. 
It should be remembered that another c. c. taken from the same sample might 
give a somewhat different count, but the difference would rarely, if ever, 
exceed 10 per cent. 


Dealer and Producer 


Designa- 
tion 


rat Con- Tots! Sol- 
tent T.e- ids Ix-ksI 
galStand- Standard 
ard S.3-> 12.00 


Pas- 
teur- 
lied 


No. of 

Bacteria 
per C. C. 


Whore Produced 


Daniel Doherty 
Woburn, Mas.-. 


Market 


3.50 


il.84 


Yes 


48,000 


Woburn. Mass. 


Willium Fallon * Ron* 
SUincham. Mans. 


Market 


3 60 


11.96 


Yes 


4.000 


•Stoneham, Mass. 


First National Stores, Inc. 
Winchester, Mass. 


Market 


3.70 


12.34 


Yes 


7.000 


Bellows Falls, Vt. 


Harvey Forbes 

Melrose. Mass. 


.Market 


3.80 


12.20 


Yes 


2.000 


Eppiatr, Derry 
and 

Goarille. N. H. 


Harvey Forbes 

Melrose. Mass. 


Crude A 


4.50 


13.64 


Yes 


2,000 


Ipswich. Mass. 


Herlihy Bros. 

Somerville, Mass. 


Market 


4.20 


12.68 


Yes 


25.000 


Milton. Vt. 


H. P Hood & Sons 

Charlestown. Mass. 


Market 


3.90 


12.44 


Yes 


6,000 


Littleton. 
Lancaster and 
Mountorne, N. H. 


H. P. Hood & Sons 

Charleatuwn. Mass. 


Grade A 


4.5<l 


13.30 


Yes 


1,000 


Concord, Mass. 


New England Creamery 
Products Company, Inc. 
Winter Hill. Mass. 


Market 


4.40 


13.30 


Yes 


2,000 


Barre, Vt. 


New England Creamery 
Products Company, Inc. 
Winter Hill. Mass. 


C-radc A A 


4.50 


13.66 


Yea 


7.000 


Wells. Me. and 
North Falmouth. 
Mass. 


Fred Schneider 

Woburn, Mass. 


Mass. 
Grade A 


3.80 


12.58 


Yes 


1.000 


Woburn. Mass. 


Charles Tabbutt 
Woburn, Mass. 


Mass. 
Grade A 


4.00 


12.94 


Yes 


2.000 


Wohurn. Mass. 


H. H. Whitromh 

Arlington. Mass. 


Market 


3.80 


12.46 


Yes 


7.000 


- ■ 

Littleton. Mass. 


H. H. Whitcomb 

Arlington. Mass. 


Guernsey 
farm 


4«(> 


13.66 


Yes 


13.000 


West Addison. Vt. 
snd Littleton, 
Westford. Mass. 


Whiting Milk Companlet 
Charles town. Mass. 


Market 


3.90 


12.70 


Yes 


13.000 


Wilton. N. H. 


Whiting Milk Companies 
Charlestown. Mass. 


Grade A 


4.20 


12.68 


Yes 


21,000 


Wilton. N. H. 



The above names are arranged alphabetically, not in order of quality of 
milk. Certain brands are not listed in this chart, because they have been 
i quantitf b> ' C ° mpetent authorities or are sol d >n Winchester in negligible 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1930 



11 



Bread on the Waters 

A good deed is never lost: who 
sows courtesy reaps friendship, 
and he who plants kindness gath- 
ers love.— Basil. 



Distinctive Hitch 

A "<ii;iinond hitch" is a method of 
fastening a rope about a pack animal's 
load by which the rope, secured by a 
eteeh; erossea so as to leave a cliu- 
mond-shaped patch on top. 



No Love in Flirtation 

What we find the lea'it of In fllrtii- 
tlon is love.— I.a Bochf foucauld. 



ninau line 01 nunor 

"Mahatma" in Hindu means great- 
souled one. 



Iiiaries at. the Star Office. 



STONEHAM 



Mat. 2:l.'i 



Eve. 7:4{ 



Sat. 6:15. S:.10 



Sun. .1 I'. M. 



Friday. Nov. 1 1 

Frederick Marsh & Claudia Colbert in "MANSLAUGHTER" 
Mona Mavis and Don Jose Majica in "ONE MAD KISS" 

Linen ware Friday 



Saturday, Nov. 15 
George O'Brien in "LAST OF THE DUANES" 

Sally O'Neil and Mollie O'Day in "SISTERS" 

PABtrES 



Sunday and Monday, Nov. 16, 17 

Norma Shearer in "LET US BE GAY" 
Rod LaRocque and Barbara Stanwyck in 
"THE LOCKED DOOR" 

SOrXI) NEWS Heautyware Monday 

Tuesday and Wednesday, Nov. 18, 19 

Richard Barthelmess in "DAWN PATROL" 

COMEm KMTE ROCKNE FOOTBALL SERIES NEWS 
Special Matinee Tuesday at 3:25 

Thursday and Friday, Nov. •_'(•. 21 

Dorothy MacKail and Milton Sills in "MAN TROUBLE" 

Fannie Brice and Robert Armstrong in "BE YOURSELF" 

U DID REVIEW 



MEDFORD THEATER 

Mat. 2:00 Eve. 7:00 

( all Mystic 1800 For Reserve Seats 



Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 17, 18, 19 
GARY COOPER in 

"Spoilers" 

BILLIE DOVE in 

"Notorious Affair" 

Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Nov. 20, 21, 22 
ROBERT MONTGOMERY in 

"Love in The Rough" 
"Silent Enemy" 

The epic of the American Indians 

Now Playing 
"DOUGH BOY" and "SINS OF THE CHILDREN" 



ORANADft MRAND 



N<.w Playing -Ends Friday 
TEL. MALDEN 0212 

J F AN ETTE Mac DON A LD 

in 

"MONTE CARLO" 

also 

"SILENT ENEMY" 



Starts Saturday, Nov. 15 
Sunday, Continuous S to ll 

CLARA BOW 

in her comedy hit 

"HER WEDDING NIGHT" 

Second Attraction 

RICHARD ARLEN in 

"SANTA FE TRAIL" 





TEL. MALDEN 3711 

7 I>a>s StJirtinjr Saturday, Nov. l"i 

REGINALD DENNY and 
I II 1 DOKSAY in 

"THOSE 3 FRENCH 
GIRLS" 

also 

A (irippin*: Drama of the North 

"MEN OF THE NORTH" 

with GILBERT ROLAND 

Coming Week of Nov, 22 
MILTON SILLS in 

"THE SEA WOLF" 



a 



Our new line of diaries, !ine-a-day 1 
hooks and calendar pads is at. the 
Star Office. 



Great Artist'* Affliction 

Joshua Key n olds, when a young 
man. contracted a mid while studying 
in !h< Vatican. Lifelong deafness re- 
sulted. 



MORTGAGEE'S SALE 

By virtue ami in execution of the Power of 
Sale contained in a certain mortgaRe given 
by Dorothy A. Brine to the Wildey Sawngs 
Bank, dated June 5, 1905 and recorded with 
Middlesex South District Deeds in Book 31 T3, 
Page 4.66. of which mortgage the undersigned 
la the present holder, for breach ol the con- 
dition, of .-aid mortgage and lor the purpose 
of foreclosing the same will he sold at pub- 
lie auction on the premises on Monday, the 
twenty-fourth day of November, 1980 at ton- 
thirty o'clock in the forenoon, all and singu- 
lar the premises which are described in said 
mortgage substantially as follows: 

\ certain parrel of land with all the build- 
ings thereon ••»*•• situated in said Win- 
chester on the Southwesterly corner of Wash- 
ington and Webster Streets, liounded anil de- 
scribed as follows, tu wit: Northwesterly 
by -aid Washington Street about one hun- 
dred and twenty three feet: Northeasterly by 
.-aid Webster Stre. t about one hundred and 
sixty five feet . Southeasterly by land of 

Caroline A Payne by a line passing through 
the centre of a hedge and the centre of two 
red cedar stakes therein about one hundred 
and twenty three feet; and Southwesterly by 
land <.f Amelia C. Greenlaw by a line pass- 
ing through the centre of a hedge anil the 
centre id' a red cedar stake at the corner of 
tie hedge about one hundred and seventy 
feet. Said premises are conveyed together 
with and subject to all right* contained in 
deed of Joseph Shattuck to Dorothy A. Brine 
dated April :i", 1».'J and recorded with Mid- 
dlesex South District Deeds, Book 2116, page 
or however otherwise said premises may 
be bounded or described." 

The premises will be sold subject to all 
unpaid taxes, '.ax titles, sewer assessments 
and municipal liens if any there are. 

A deposit of five hundred dollars I $500.) in 
cash will be required to la* paid by the pur- 
chaser at the time and place of sale, the 
balance to be paid in tell (10J days from 
dale of sale. 

WII DEY SAVINOS BANK. 

Mortgagee 

By Frank B. ( utter, 

President 

William J. Kurth, Atty., 



.! Tremont Street, 
Boston, .Mas-. 



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thut the 
subscriber has been duly appointed executor 
of tie- will of David A. Carlue late of Win- 
chester in tin- County of Middlesex, deceased, 
testate, and has taken upon himself that trust 
by giving Isoid, as the law directs. 

All persons having demands upon the es- 
tate of said d used are hereby required to 

exhibit the same; and all persons indebted 
to said estate are called upon to make pay- 
ment i<) 

GEORGE It. H AY WARD, Executor 
i Address I 
10 Court Street, Boston, Muss. 
October 20, ttiao o9t-3t 



BOWDOINi?H T T rH E u A o T SI 



WtlK 01 NOV 16 - SUN -WOfl - tUtS -WUW lal KING HITS 

MILTON SILLS in ' 7he SEA WOLF " 
FIFI DORSfty in "THOSE THREE FRENCH GIRLS" 

5 R-K-0 VAUDEVILLE ACTSjn Person 

BltitNHING NCX7 THUKS - LNIIRI NI W SHOW 

mRjoRn i*Mh:»u-xicAitoo cwm-pwiups mints- 

JAMIS 01 IAS0N aho -HHICHI (r/S~„M 00f0!lt> miKHJII- 
fRAfK fAY - NVAH tiHRy - tOOIl NMtNl- 



M. 



A Cambridge Instifuliii 



University/ 
Theatre 

Harvard Square. Cainbridfe. Mass 

Now Playing 
John McCormack in 
"SONG <>• MY HEART" 
Irene Rich in 
"ON YOUR BACK" 
Sun. Mr.n. Tues. Wed, 
Nov. Hi, 17, IK, in 

HELEN TWELVETREES in 

"HER MAN" 

"QUEEN HIGH" 
Stanley Smith and 
Ginge r Rogers 

Thurs. I'ri. Sat. 
Nov. 20. 21. 22 
NORMA TALMADGE in 

"DU BARRY. WOM- 
AN OF PASSION" 

Dorothy ..Wkaill in 
"BRIGHT I IGHTS" 




CAPITA 

Now Showing 
Claudette Colbert in 
"MANSLAUGHTER" 

and 

Jack Oakie in 

"LET'S GO NATIVE" 

Saturday Evening football Pictures 

Mon. Tues. Wed.. Nov. IT. 1«, lit 
A Picture or Drama and Pathos 

"SINS OF THE CHILDREN" 

with LEILA HYAMS 
Edward Everett Burton in 
"ONCE A GENTLEMAN" 



Thurs. Fl 



Sat., Nov. 20, 21. 22 



RUTH CHATTERTON and 
(LIVE KROOK in 

"ANYBODY'S WOMAN" 

Sally Starr in 
•PARDON MY GUN" 
Big Gift Night Saturday Evening 



Nov. 24. 25. 26 
All Ouiet on the Western Proof' 



MYSTIC 



THEATRE 
MALDEIM 



Now Playing— Ends Saturday 
Tel. Maiden 1230 

Paul Whiteman and Band in "KING OF JAZZ" 
Rin-Tin-Tin in "MAN HUNTER" 

Starts Saturrlav. Nov. 15th — Sumlav Continuous 3 to 11 

"ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT" 

A great book — now a wonderful picture 



K. M. LOEWS 



Regent 

ARLINGTON 
1 Medford St. Tel. Art. 1197 



Monday. Tues., Nov. IT, 18 

Joe Cook in 
"RAIN OR SHINE" 



Merna Kennedy in 
"WORLDLY GOODS" 

ABSOLUTELY FREE TO OUR 
LADY PATRONS 

A Selected Line of Amoskcag 
Products and 
Parisian Boudoir Set 

Betfinninp Monday Night, Nov. 
17 and Tuesday Night. Nov. IS 
and every Monday and Tuesday 
thereafter. 



Mr. Frank E. Rowe of the Town 
Planning Board was elected president 
of the Field and Forest Club at the 
recent annual meeting of the organi- 
zation, held in the Twentieth Century 
Club. Boston. The members held their 
annua! Armistice Fay outing on Tues- 
day at Foxboro. 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the sub- 
scribers have been duly appoint .d executors of 
the will of Alice Helen Pratt late of Winches- 
ter in the County of Middlesex, Maaa deceased, 
testate, and have taa -n upon themselves that 
trust by giving bond, as tne law directs 

All persona having: demands upon the es- 
tate of said deceased are hereby required to 
exhibit the -am. ; and all persona Indebted to 
saifl estate are called upon t.i make payment 
to 

ELMER IV FLETCHER 
CHAS. H. PRATT 

Executors 

i Address I 
20 George St.. Somerville, Mass. 
8 Lagrange St.. Winchester Mas-. 

November 8, 1930 nH-3t 



We never have enough of the Philip 
Brooks calendars. Now on sale at the 
STAR office. 



WINCHESTER NATIONAL BANK 

In compliance with the requirements of 
Chapter, 590, Section 40, Acts of 1808, as 
amended by Chapter 481, Section 6, Acts of 
is>o<<. and by c halter 171. Section 1. Act.- of 
1912, notice is hereby given of the loss of 
pass-book No. 13*0. 

EDWIN M. NELSON, Cashier 

n7-3t 



QUITO: EQUATORIAL CITY 
SPRINGLIKE CLIMATE 



OF 



Cabinet reinstated 
voting confidence in 
Quito, i ho country's 

to itst 



down 



ti 



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai the 
subscribers have been duly appointed execu- 
tors oi the will of Daniel Webster Pratt late 
of Winchester in the County of Middlesex, 
Massachusetts, deceased, testate, and have tak- 
en upon themselves that trust by giving bonds, 
as the law direct.-. 

All persons having demands upon the cs- 



i the 
itanta 
i\s a 
It C. 
Geo- 



COMMON WEALTH 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 



OF 



MASSACHUSETTS ' 

PROBATE COURT 



tate of said dit 
exhibit the slime 

said estate are 1 
to 



Add 



ed are hoi 
ind all per: 
led upon to 



, by 



required to 
indebted to 
ke payment 



i ll \R1.1 s H PRATT 
ELMER D. r LETCHER 
Executors 



1 1 



sled ill the estate of 
-•f Winchester in .-aid 



r>31-3t 



To all persons intei 
Pannle E. Rus-. 11 late 
County, deceased: 

WHEREAS, the State Street Trust Company 
the surviving executor of the will of said de- 
ceased, has presented for allowance the first 
account of the administration of ftaelf and 
Edward M. Moore upon th,. istat. of said 
de^sed; together with the tirst account of it- 
self a.- surviving executor of said wilt, and the 
accountant requests that the items of said 
accounts be finally det< rmlned and adjudicated. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a Pro- 
bate Court, to be held at Cambridge in said 
county, on the seventeenth day of November 
A lb 1930 at ten o'clach in the forenoon, to 

-how cause, if any you have, why the same 
should not be allowed. 

And -aid executor is ordered to serve this 
citation by delivering a copy thereof to all 
persons interested in the estate fourteen days 
at l.asl before sal. I Court or by publishing 
the -.one once in each week, for three succes- 
sive weeks, in The Winchester Star a news- 
paper published in Winchester the last pub- 
lication to be one day at least before said 
Court, and by mailing, post-paid, a copy of 
this citation to all known persons interested 
in tin- estate .-even days at lea.-t before said 
Court. 

Win,,—, JOHN c. LEGO AT, Esquire, First 
Judge ..I' said Court, this twenty-third day of 
October in the year one thousand nine hun- 
dred and thirty. 

LOR1NG 1'. JORDAN, Register 

o81-3t 



Street. 
Somerville, Mass. 
s Lagrange Street. 

w inchester, Mass, 
November 5, 1930 



n7-:it 



Winchester, Mass . Nov l, 1930 
To the Middlesex County Commissioners; 

Respectfully represent the undersigned In- 
habitants of the town of Winchester, in said 
I ounty, that High Street, in -aid Winchester, 
should ho relocated and specifically repaired. 

ay that you will relocat 
lid direct specific 



With Ecuador 
and its (."engross 
;ts President 
unique capita'., settles 
normal status. 
_ Quito's suburbs nearly 
Equator but 100,1)00 inhat 
enjoy perpetual springtime, s 
bulletin from the Washington, 
headquarters of the National 
graphic Society, The city nestles in 
a bowl-shaped depression" nearly two 
miles high among the Andean peaks. 
Snow-capped mountains are visible 

from the streets. 

Railroad Makes City Accessible 

Before the completion of the Quito- 
Guayaquil railroad, connecting the 
capital with Ecuador's principal gate- 
way and port, Quito was isolated. The 
few travelers that visited the city 
trekked for two weeks over difficult 
traiU to reach Quito. Now, by rail, 
they may alight at the Quito depot 
th. evening of the second day out of 
Guayaquij. The night is spent at a 
i picturesque An- 



.-tu 




MORTGAGEE'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE 



By virtue of the powi 
a certain mortgage th 
Elliott lo the Winches! 
dated October s, 1929, 



r of sale contained in 

id given Harrv T. 
r C pi i at l\ e Hank. 

being Document No. 



| 101,!.'S2 noted on Certiflcate of Title No. 
. 2!).x;,l tiled in the Smith Registry District for 
' Middlesex County, Registration Hook 200, 
| Page 205, for breach of the conditions of said 
I mortgage and lor the purpose of foreclosing 
the same will Ik 1 sold at public auction on the 
pnnii.-es hereinafter described on Monday. 
I November J I. 1930 at nine o'clock in the fore- 
noon, all and singular the premises conveyed 
by said mortgage deed, ami therein substan- 
tially described as follows: 

"A certain parcel of land with the build- 
I ing- thereon situated in Winchester, Middle- 
, sex County, on Grayson Road, and being 
I shown a- Lot 33 on a plan hereinafter re- 
more fully bounded 
s : Southwesterly by 
Ion 166.321 
one hundred 



Win r< fo 
naid High 
then on. 

II VRRY W. s l i A I NS 

and four others. 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS, 

At a no tin*.: of the County Commissioners 
for the County of Middlesex, at Lowell, in 
.-aid County, on tne first Tuesda} of Septem- 
ber, in the year of our Lord one thousand 
nine hundred and thirty, to wit, by adjourn- 
ment at Cambridge in said County, on the 
seventh day of November, A. D. 1980. 

ON th,' foregoing petition, Ordered, that 
the Sheriff of said County, or his Deputy give 
notice to all persons and corporations inter- 
ested therein, that said Commissioners will 
me» t for the purpose of viewing the premises 
and hearing the parties at the Commissioners' 
(Jfllee, Court House, Cambridge in .-aid Coun- 
ty, ..ll Krida) tin- twelfth das of December, 
A. I). 19311, .it ton of the clock in tin- fore- 
noon, b> serving the Clerk of the town of 
Winchester, with a copy of said petition and 
of this order thereon, thirty days at lea.-t be- 
fore -aid view, and by publishing tile -ann- 
ul the Winchester Star a new-paper printed 
at Winchester, three weeks successively, the 
la-t publication to be fourteen days at l,a-t 
before -aid view, and also by posting the same 
in two public plan - in the -aid town of Win- 
cheater, fourteen days before .-aid view; and 
thalt be make return of his doings herein, to 
said Commissioners, at the time and place 
fixed for said view and bearing. 

CHARLES T. HUGHES, 



base of Mt . Chim- 
loftiest mountain 

Quito reveal what, 
done for the city, 
been lifted from 
set down in the 



hotel in Riobamba 
dean town near the 
borazo Ecuador's 
pea k. 

Shop window's of 
air, ! the freight car has 
: They might have 
Fifth Avenue and 

streets of the capital. Behind largo 
plate glass windows are displayed 
American radios, bolts of English 
cloth, French perfumery and cosmet- 
ics, and chinaware from Germany. 
Motor Cars ami Caravans 
At the curb purr motors of smart, 
rod. green and yellow automobiles 
from Detroit that have just dis- 
charged wealth'- Quitans dressed in 
the latest fashions from New York, 
1 London and Paris. 

I Hut Quito retains remnants even 
1 of pre-Spanish days. The smart motor 
cars must dodge straggling, dust-cov- 
ered, donkeys and llamas with car- 
goes of lumber, bags of cacao beans 
: and vegetables, and bundles u f Pana- 
ma hat - lnshed t.. their backs. If the 
traveler knows his Ecuador Indians, 
he can identify their origin by the 

ponchos 



cut 
and 
Ten 



it t h 



>r; 



Dollar 



Copy of petitii 
Attest, 



e 



•der tin 



rcnani 

mama Hat 
Headgear 

ans make Qu 
sidencei many 



ire Popular 



CM \RI.ES T. 



A true copy. 
Attest : 



HUGHES, 
Asst. Clerk 



HENRY I 



. WAL 

Deputy 



,KI!. 



nl i-:st 



; Many Ind 
permanent n 

fo from the rural district: 
Quito -tin. In the market 
I bright -bawl- and ponchos 
I tives add color to the pill 
and vegetables, homemade 
I dyed cloth. Some of 1 1 



oi 1 



their 
• ami 



lot bei 
foil 



ferreil to. said 
ami described 

Grayson Road sixty-six ami "J 
fi t . South, nstorly by Lot 18, 



six and 96 loo (106.05) f.-, t : Northeasterly 
by land now or formerly of George K. Nugent, 
sixty-six and 50 UK) (66,50) feet; Northwest- 
erlj by Lot 34, one hundred two and 07 loo 
f 102.071 tei t. All of -aid boundaries are de- 
termined t, ( be locnted a- shown on a plan 
drawn by I'arker Holbrook. Engineer, dated 
July 24, 1929, and filed m the Middlesex 
South Di-tiict Deeds, as plan numbered 3536- 
1. and filed with Certificate of Title No. 
29.39K. The above premises are subject to 
restrictions of record so far as the same may 
now be in force and applicable. Hereby con- 
veying the same premises conveyed to Har- 
rj T Elliott by the Winchester Realty Com- 
pany, by deed dated Oct. 7, 1929, and duly 
recorded with said Deeds." 

Said premises will be sold subject to all 
unpaid taxes, tax titles, assessments or other 
municipal liens. $200.00 in cash will be re- 
ouired to be paid at the time of the sale and 
the balance to be paid within ten (10) days 
from the date of sale at Ro.m sin. in State 
Street, Boston, Mass. Other particulars made 
known at time of sale. 
WINCHESTER CO-OPERATIVE 



Hy Ernest R. 
For further information ap| 
Nash, to State Street, Boston, 



Eustis, 
v to 
St as 



HANK, 
Mortgagee 

Treasurer 
Curtis W. 
o31-8t 



COMMONWEALTH OK MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 
ll.. S.I 

WHEREAS, at a meeting of the County 
Commissioners lor said County, at Lowell on 
the first Tuesday of September A. D. 1'J30, 

ON THE PETITION of the Selectmen of 
Winchester, praying for the relocation of High 
Street, beginning at a point marly opposite 
it- junction with Arlington Street, thence 
westerly for a distance of about loon (eel . 
also lor the relocation of Main Stre, t from 
its junction with Highland Avenue north- 
westerly of the Medford line: thence north- 
westerly past it- junction with Bacon ami 
Grove Streets to it* junction with .Madison 
Avenue, it was adjudged that -aid relocation 
of Main Street i- of common convenience 
ami in cessit) : 

Said Commissioners therefore give notice 

that they will meet at Commissioners' Office, 
Court House, ill Cambridge on the twelfth day 
of December A. D. 1930, at ten o'clock in the 
forenoon, t,, relocate accordingly. 

CHARLES T. HUGHES, 

As.-t. Clerk 

Nov* mher •. 1080 
A true copy. 

Attest: Henry I,. Walker, Deputy Sheriff 

nl4-l)t 



skinned visit 
who spceinliz 
prefer the sti 
merchandise. 



■ s part ICUltl 
in selling 
ets to dispos 
Nearly 



with the 
place the 
f the tia- 
ii I' fruit 
lolls and 
bronze- 
lv Fmisc' 



ti an 



11 of 



\V| 

is 



Br 
ih 
In 
Span 
rated 
torns. 
Maw r 
with ii 
facing 
out th 



their 
t hem 
• Bcuador 

hats 

; that tin* 
or they satu- 
\\ Ith their cus- 
ncipal square, Plaza 
out in Spanish style, 
sh government building 
ere and there, through- 
ornate facades of Spa- 



Pananin hat- beenu 
i home of "Panama" 
nearly thr< centurl 

ruled F.cua ' 
the capital city 

The pi 
r, N laid 
a Spani 
it. II 
city. 



Office of fhe 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Winchester, Mass. 

You are hereby required on or 
before Dee. 1, 1930 to destroy 
the gypsy and brown-tail moths 
on your property in this town. 

This notification is in accord- 
ance with Chapter 132, Section 
18, General Laws, which re- 
(luires cities and towns to de- 
stroy the eggs, caterpillars, pu- 
pae and nests of the gypsy and 
brown-tail moths, under heavy 
penalty for failure to comply 
with the provisions of the law. 

If a property owner tails to 
destroy such eggs, caterpillars, 
pupae and nests, then the city or 
town is required to destroy the 
same, and the cost of the work, 
in whole or in part, according 
to the value of the land, is as- 
sessed upon and becomes a lien 
on the land. (See Section IS, 
Chapter 132, General I.aws, on 
reterse). 

The Selectmen ask owners and 
tenants to co-operate with the 
town in its work on highways 
and other public grounds by do- 
ing effective work, on their prem- 
ises. Citizens, who have cleaned 
their premises of the moths but 
find their trees endangered b> 
the neglect of owners of ad- 
joining estates, should make 
complaint to the Selectmen. The 
infestation of a residential 
neighborhood by the neglect of 
a few will not he tolerated. 

The eggs of the gypsy moths 
should be destroyed at once with 
creosote. They should never be 
scraped off the object on which 
they are laid. Careful search 
should be made for gypsy moth 
egg clusters, not only on trees, 
but also on house walls, stone 
walls, fences and in rubbish 
heaps, etc. (Trees in which cav- 
ities occur and which it is not 
desirable to rut should have the 
cavities tinned or cemented. This 
is important.) The present and 
future cost of combating this 
insect can be greatly reduced by 
cutting and burning worthless 
brush, hollow trees, etc. A few- 
trees well cared for are more 
valuable to the property owner 
and the community than a large 
number of neglected trees. 

The nests of the brown-tail 
moths should be cut off the trees, 
carefully collected and burned in 
stove or furnace. 

OCTOBER. 1930 o31-St 



> purpose of roreelrming woven leather belts, 
at public auction on the , 

oi 



MORTGAGEE'S SALE of REAL ESTATE 

Hy virtue of the power of aale contained in 
a certain mortgage deed given by John P. 

Whittcn to the Winchester Co-operative Itallk. 
dateil January 8, 1930 and recorded with 
Middlesex South District Deed.-. Hook 5428, 
Page 63, for breach of the condition* of said 
mortgage ami for th 
the same will be sold 

premises hereinafter described on Monday, 
December 1. 1930 at nine o'clock in the fore- 
noon, all anil singular the premtaca conveyed 
hy said mortgage deed and therein substan- 
tially described as follows: 

"A certain parcel of land «ith the build- 
ings thereon situated in Winchester, Middle. 
se.i County, Massachusetts, shown as Lot 
numbered :127. and seventeen iITi feet of 
Lot H2S adjoining, on plan entitled Tart One. 
Symmea Park, Winchester and Medford, Mass., 
developed tiy Bonelli-Adams Co.,' by Ernest 
W. Hranch. Civil Engineer, dated June 24, 
11125. recorded with Middlesex South District 
Deeds. Plan Hook 358, Plan ll. containing 
6597 square feet more or less, bounded and 
ue-erili d as follows: 

Southwesterly by Hollywood Road, sixty- 

l« 1 67.50 1 feet: 



nish churches rise above the root 
tops. The narrow cobbled street* 
flanked by white red-roofed houses 
with balconied upper stories recall 
streets of cities in Spain. 

Many ot' these Spanish-appearing 
houses are occupied by pure blooded 
Spanish families. Frequently, how- 
ever, a sort of native variety shop 
I occupies the first floor where sacks of 
grain and vegetables, reels of rope, 
j and piles of blankets block the door- 
way, while the sides and tops of the 
! openings are ornamented with c!us- 
ters ef rat traps, tin cups and cheap 
I trinkets, donkey belly bands, and 



MASSACHUSETTS 

PROBATE COURT 
xt of kin and all 
1 1 1 tin- estate of 
late of Wiin besti r 



a ml 



326 on said 
(93.841 feet! 
now or formerly 

iKTl feet ; and 



plan, 
of 



Northwesterly by Lot 
ninety-three and S4 100 

Northeasterly by land 
W. W. Thomas, sixty-seven i K7 1 feel 

Southeasterly by the remaining portion of 
lad 328 on said plan, one hundred (100) feet. 

Said premises are subject to restrictions of 
record ho far a* in force and applicable. Here- 
by conveying the same premises conveyed to 
said John P. Whitten by The Bonelli- Ada mo 
Investment Corporation, by deed dated Janu- 
ary 6, 1980 and duly recorded with Middlesex 
South District Diicds. herewith." 

Said premises will be sold subject to all 
unpaid taxes, tax titles, assessments or other 
municipal liens. $200.00 in cash will be re- 
quired to he paiil at the tune of the sale ami 
the balance to be paid within ten (101 days 
from the date of sale at Koom 810. 10 State 
Street, Boston, Ma.-s. Other particulars made 
known at time of sale. 

WINCHESTER CO-OPERATIVE HANK. 

Mortgagee 

Hy Ernest It Eustis, Treasurer 
Fur further information apply to Curtis W 
Nash. 10 State Street, Boston Mass nT-'U 

SILK SALE 



COMMONWEALTH 

MIDDI ESEX. SS. 

To the heirs-at-law, n. 
other persons interested 
Jteinnn Theresa O'Connell 
In said County, deceased. 

WHEREAS, a certain instrument purport- 
ing to be the last w ill ami testament of said 
deceased has been presented to said Court, 
for probate. Daniel L. Brown who praysj 
that letters testamentary may be issued to 
him the executor therein named without Klv- 
ing a surety on le,s ollieial bond. 

You are hereby cited to nppear at n Pro- 
bate Court to he held at Cambridge in sabl 
County of Middlesex, on the seventeenth liay 
of Novrmts r A. I). 1930, at ten o'clock in 
the forenoon, to show ca ise, if any you have, 
why tin* same should not be grantod. 

And said petitioner is hereby directed to 
iriie public notice thereof, by publishing this 
citation once in each week, for throe succes- 
sive weeks, in The Winchester Star a new* 
paper published in Winchester the last py 

iieatioti to I ne day, at least, before (.. 

Court, and by mailing, post-paid, or desir- 
ing a copy of this citation to all know;, at 
sons interested in the estate, seven 
lea.-t before -aid Court. First 

Witness, JOHN C. LKGGAT, Esnrth day 
Judge of -am Court, this tcventyind nine 
of October in the year one tl 
hunilr ■! ami thirty. Register 
o^l-3t LOHING I'. JOKD 

Al. E.STAT E 

MORTGAGEE'S SALE OF 

a.'n contained in 

Hy virtue of the powei^" Thomas a. 
a certain mortgage dee^**- L. Richardson, 
Richardson and Charp l,nt8 -by-the entirety, 
husband and wife. p'Setts, to the Home- 
of Winchester, Mar "' "oston, Massachu- 
stead Cooperative and recorded with 

setts, dat.-d April," r, ' t Deeds, lbs,k r. i*;2. 
Middlesex SoutH' !h ' conditions contained 
I'aire .>. for bi'"' f '' r Purpose of f„ rv . 
in said morta Wl " '"' "Old at publ 



10.000 dress-length 
finest silk to be chare 
irardless. Every desire 
color. All '.i'.) inches 



remnants of 
d by mail, re- 
d yardage and 
wide. Let us 



send you a piece of trenuine $6 Crepe 
Paris (very heavy flat crepe) on ap- 
proval for your inspection. If yot; 
then wish to keep it mail us 



check at only $1,90 a yard. (Origi 
price $6 a yd.). Or choose prj 
Crepe 1'aris. Every wanted cor-^ 
tion <»f colors. We will gladl jrs 
you a piece to look at. Whg£ e P 
and yardape, please? If - ;) a 
it you ran mail us cheek § r ' 
yd. (Final reduction. C 
a yd.) , an ' ! *2 

All $2 silks. $2 " ,L , ,n ih >* 
printed crepes are I*' 1 a ,~ k or 
sale. Every color, f th | who! e 
buy from sample- ' fo v '.' deciding, 
piece you are get' ew .V ork '' t ' <Vl "- 
We want to be Z ?° abo "t 
ence so tell us oe tne mec " >'"u 
yourself and, f n ; " l [,r ^ al . Write 
want to s ' 1rinf '.v. To advertise 

NOW Se> send you a s P° o1 



aur- 

remise, described m said 
aturday, December «th 1980 

l" '"^ "> 'he forenoon, ali 

the prem,-,- described in said 

. the land in Winchester with 

ther.-on. being the premi-.-s now 
Washington Str.s-t bounded 
ows : Commencing at the 
mer of land now or former, 
st n point on the Wester- 
Street, sixty-two 

asterly corner of 
Struts thence running 
Street fifty (50) 



folio 



closing the 
tion upon 
mortgage 

at half .• 
and si* ' 

,h ' Hbed 

erly 

|»ohn Benson 
ne of Washington 
South of the South 
•ss and Washington 
ith.rlv .,n Washington 
hotter • 5» iT'" 0Wn ! ed hy lh " Town" of W,n- 
snd oVth« w-™ n ? w- ^" St " Hy »'""" '»'<« 

iwelve.nd 40T00 nuuflS*- T ""I*'* 
ing al n.ark . L. , ! th, "<'o turn- 

N it h..|v I ,f rl JL M running 
the . remaining land of the4 
Hfty-five (66) feet to the 
r formerly „f j„ hn Benntm ■ 
- Easterly alonif said land of 

John Benaon, on, hundred and r. to (J00.8) 

ton W "c'm,"' U ™<>*- « Washing- 

i.;,; 1 .-"" »« W mea-urements'more 

si Jv J SaT', '•T'r 5 '"•" v ">'" 1 f us "by 
mari j. Sage by de<-,| dated May 1st lv>t 

and recorded with said Deeds. Book \<m, 
will be -old sub- 
mpaid taxe,, tax titles, 
nicipal assessments 
may be Two Hundred Dollars 
purchaser at time and 



by t 
grantors, about 

-aid land now , 
thence running 



tenrded 
l'aire 167, ,s a j,| t , n .„ 
Ject to «ny and ali 
unpaid water hills, and 
if any there may tw- 
in rash tr, be p«„j [, 
place of sale, rurth* 



;it th. 



erms to be announced 



HOMESTEAD 

Jiy William D 



Walter H 
81 State 



ami 

St., 



COOPERATIVE BANK, 

Mortgagee 
r.ldre,|„e. Treasurer, 
Bromfleld St., Boston 
Hubert,.., Attys.. 

nlt-3t 



Paul u 
Boston 



12 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS. , STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER H, 1930 



Here's An Opportunity 

TO BUY A NEW HOUSE AT YOUR OWN PRICE 

PUBLIC AUCTION 

On Monday, November 17th 

AT 9 A, M. ON THE PREMISES 

The Winchester Co-operative Bank, in order to sat- 
isfy its claim as first mortgagee, will offer to the highest 
bidder the brand new six room house and 6500 square 
feet of land at 

2 GREELY ROAD (off Myrtle Terrace) 

The house is a reproduction of the early New England 
Colonial type and contains on the first floor a large living 
room with fireplace panelled dining room, modern cup- 
hoard kitchen, and open porch; on the second floor there 
are three well arranged chambers and tiled bath — attrac- 
tively decorated throughout with period wall papers and 
fixtures. The property is well located on high land and 
represents a much larger investment than the claim of'the 
first mortgagee. A Real Bargain for someone. 

OPEN FOR INSPECTION AT THE TIME OF SALE 
OR BY APPOINTMENT WITHOUT ANY OBLIGATION 

Full Particulars of 

Edward T. Harrington Inc. 

39 CHURCH STREET WINCHESTER 1400 

W. Allan Wilde, Auctioneer 




ONCE A WEEK 

is not too often to have Bailey's drivers 

call for a suit to be 
Brushed Clean, Sponged and Pressed 

75c 

BAILEY'S CLEANSERS & DYERS, INC. 



17 Church St. 
Winchester, Mass. 
Tel. Win. 032S 



Watertown, Mass. 
Tel. -Mid. 4561 




\ 



>pt unartneu of a new 
. odor or /almc, afifiearw 
one of mr frock ard 
rds till favorable cc?nmmtl^> 





<~ HOSIER! • tltlOUVEAR* GIFTS ~ 



WBICKESIER 



Automobile 
Insurance 

$3 down 

BALANCE IN SMALL MONTHLY PAYMENTS 
WELL KNOWN STRONG COMPANIES 



-,57 V 



L. W. PUFFER, Jr. 

X STREET WINCHESTER 
TEL. AVIS'. 1980 — RES. WIN. 1100 

o31-tf 



Suggest^ In Holiday GiBs 

WE INVITE YOU fL , 

FINE LINEN TOWELS 1 CONSIDER OUR SELECTIONS 

SPECIAL LINE OF APRONS LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS 

Bt 

BOYS' SHEEPSKIN LINED COAT* HITE AND COLORED 

WOOL Li 

LADIES' KID GLOVES DRIVING GLOVES 

BLACK 

ATTRACTIVE SILK SCARFS > TAN SHA0ES 

POPULAR NE 

*T BOOKS 

Franklin E. Barney 

VISIT OUR TOY COUNTER 



VERNON W. JONES 
Suburban Real Estate 

31 CHURCH STREET 

WE HAVE just listed a very pood buy in a Duplex House, 8 
rooms each side. A home with an income. Easy terms. Price 
$10,000. 

FOR KENT — Single house of seven rooms, and bath, 2 -car ga- 
rage. Only $85. 

ALSO many other singles and apartments from $45 up. 

TELEPHONE WINCHESTER 0898 



CHARLES HAGUE 

Cabinet Maker 

Antique* Kmtarrd — Furniture Made and 

Repaired — t'phalstered and Poliahed. 
SHOP, 17 PARK ST.. WINCHESTER 
Tel. Win. 194S-W 

nl8-tf 




CAPE COD COLONIAL 

In an ideal setting and within easy access 
to schools and transportation, stands this 
<iuaint Cape Cod Colonial home. Of course 
there is the typical open porch, the attractive 
panelling in the living room, and the old-fash- 
ioned fireplace. 

Briefly seven rooms, which includes the 
customary living room, dining room, kitchen 
and a guest room with hath on the first floor; 
and three large, comfortable chambers and a tiled bath on the 
second. There is also a two-car garage and a large lot of land. 

Built by a reputable builder, out of the best quality material, 
and priced very attractively. 

For an appointment to inspect call Mr. Puffer. 

HENRY W. SAVAGE, Inc. 

273 HARVARD STREET. COOLIDGE CORNER, BROOK LINE 
Est. 1M0 REALTORS Asp. 1504 

WINCHESTER OFFICE, 557 MAIN STREET, TEL. WIN. 1980 
RES. TEL. WIN. llfiO 



Walter Charming, Inc. 

REALTORS 

FURNISHED HOUSE, $100— Excellent location, near center, 
cheerful, sunny house with garage. 

FAIRLY NEW 7-ROOM, SINGLE COLONIAL— On spacious 
grounds in high-grade West Side location. Beautiful master's 
chamber with private shower bath. Price concession to meet 
market. 

Tel. Winchester 0984 
Helen I. Fessenden Resident Representative 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



NEWSY P \RAGRAPH3 



First Church of Christ, Scientist, 
Winchester, cordially invites you to 
a free public lecture on Christian 
Science by Miss M. Ethel Whitcomb, 
C.S.B., of Boston a member of the 
Board of Lectureship of The Mother 
Church, The First Church of Christ, 
Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts, 
on Friday evening. Nov. 121. at X 
o'clock in the Town Hall, Winchester. 

n7-3t 

R. R. Barron and I.. F. Brown of 
this town were among the 128 fresh- 
men to be pledged to fraternities at 
the University of Vermont this year. 
They were pledged to Kappa Sigma. 

Spencer Corsets, borne appoint- 
ments. Jean MacLellan. Tel. Win. 
040fi-R. ap*J7-tf 

Mrs. John Cline of Main street won 
second prize with her entry in the 
novice class for Pekinese in the recent 
show which closed last Saturday at the 
Hotel Statler. 

Sea Food of all kinds. Cotuit oy- 
sters on half shell our specialty. Win- 
chester Sea Food Shoo. 612 Main 
street, tel. Win. 2S^K Free Delivery. 

o31-5t 

While on duty in the square Armis- 
tice Day. Traffic Officer John Noonan 
picked iip two youngsters who turned 
out to be runaway State boys from the 
home of a resident of Woburn. They 
were returned to their home. 

Clifton Campbell of M il Washington 
street reported the theft of a bushel 
and a half of apples and a bag ot po- 
tatoes from his home sometime previ- 
ous to the holiday. The police are in- 
vestigating. 



First Church of Christ, Scientist, 
Winchester, cordially invites you to 
a free public lecture on Christian 
Science by Miss M. Ethel Whitcomb, 
C.S.B., of Boston a member of the 
Board of Lectureship of The Mother 
Church, The First Church of Christ, 
Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts, 
on Friday evening, Nov. 21, at 8 
o'clock in the Town Hall, Winchester. 

n7-3t 

Mr. Allan R. Wilson of Winchester 
was an usher at the Gould-Burroughs 
wedding which took place last Satur- 
day evening in Christ Episcopal 
Church. Quincy. 




JUNIOR COUNTRY CLUB 

10 Winn Street, Woburn 

GOLF — most heautiful miniature count 

in New England. IS hole. 50c: a«c- 

ond round 35c. 
DANCE — Snappy band, Friday and 

Saturday Evening. "5c per couple. 
EAT Delicioua toasted aandwichea. 

Light ref reahmenta. 
Come in and ae* our attractive club- 
house. Open 12 noon to 12 raidnite 



SUNDAYS 1 P. M. 



to 11 P. M. 

n7-4t 



ALEXANDER 
GRAHAM BELL 

"Of all faiths a man's faith 
in his own destiny is the 
most important." 

npilh traditions are respect* 
••(1 in rites conducted by 
| us and tin- ceremony is one 
; of beauty and dignity. 

M0FFETT and MeMULLEN 

Funeral Directors and 
Embalmers 

TEL. WIN. 1730 

Lady Assistant Taxi Service 



You May Have Voted Yes 
Or No On Tuesday 

But you're sure to vote YES in favor of the new Gowns, 
Pajamas and Step-ins, at 



NORMAN V. OSBORNE 

Carpenter and Builder 

1 CLIFF ST. WINCHESTER 
Tel. Win. 2021 -W 



-i"-tf 



BLANCHARD 

for 

LUMBER 



A. M. EDLEFSON 

REAL ESTATE & MORTGAGES 

FOR SALE 

ON THE WEST SIDE— Near the station, in a quiet location, 
9-room house, is a maximum of Comfort at a minimum expense; 
oil heat, electric refrigeration, 2 baths, plea-ant gas kitchen, one- 
tar garage. The house is in excellent condition inside and out. 
The price is $13,000. 

THREE excellent building lots on West Side. 



10 STATE STREET, BOSTON TEL. HUBBARD 1978 

Winchester Office, 2 Thompson Street 
Tel. Win. 2285 Res. Tel. Win. 0700 



We are as near as your telephone 

P. H. HIGGI1YS WINCHESTER 0*06 



17 KEN WIN ROAD 



Commercial and Home Photographer 

If you have pictures to be framed a 
telephone call will bring demonstrator. 

Leave your lilfns at Hevey's Fharmacy 
or Star Office for our usual service. 



FOR SALE 

A WELL PLANNED HOME, modern in every respect, located 
f-n one of Winchesters most exclusive streets. New 7-ioom house 
with sun room, jrumwood finish, lavotory on first floor. 4 chambers, 
dressing room, tiled bath with shower, hot water heat, heated pa- 
rage. Large lot of land with shade trees. Priced at $11,500, with 
terms, makes this a real buy. 

RENTALS — Single houses and apartments, $45 to $150 per 
month. 

S. V. OLSON 

572 MAIN STREET WINCHESTER 
Tel. Win. 0032— Res. 0365 

•20-tf 



RENTALS 

We have at present a number of attractive single 
houses which can be rented at very reasonable figures, 
the rents varying from $75 a month to $150. 

If you are thinking of renting a single house, let us 
submit our list. 



A. Miles Holbrook 

24 Church St.— Win. 1250 Res.— Tel. 0609 

STEPHEN THOMPSON, Win. 0103-W 




Needle Work Guild of America 



This year tin- Winchester branch of the .Needle Work 
Guild, are asking for better, wanner gifts than usual, in an- 
ticipation of this winter. They feel the calls may be more 
abundant and more urgent than before. Let us do our part. 
Buy early and help those less fortunate than ourselves. 

We have as usual a fine line of I'nderwear, Stockings, 
Gloves and Mittens, Night Robes, Blankets and Comforters. 
In fact most anything you might desire to buy for one less 
fortunate. 



I 



Merchandise was never more attractive than this year. 
We are already showing bright new things suitable for Holi- 
day Gifts. 

Have you seen our Christmas Wrappings and Cards? 
AGENT FOR CASH'S WOVEN NAMES 



G. Raymond Bancroft 



Ttl. Win. 067 1. W 



15 Mt. VtriM Strttt 



THE WINCHESTER STAR 



VOL. L NO. 17 



WINCHESTER, MASS, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1980 



PRICE SEVEN CENT 




FIREMAN SUSPENDED FOR TWO 
WEEKS 



V, a- Driver of Apparatus Which 
Collided with Winchester Worn. 
an > Sedan Sunday 



WINCHESTER HOSPITAL 
Work of the Winton Club 



Fireman J. Edward Noonan of the 
Winchester Fire Department uas 
notified yesterday by Chief David H. 
Dei ourcj of hi.-, suspension for two 
weeks without pay and the loss of 

libel t! 



I he Winton Club was started in 
U inchester over 17 years ago to work 
for the Winchester Hospital. It has 
attended to sewing and mending for 
the hospital and has in all these years 
contributed generously toward the 
purchase of new linen. There are 60 
active members and 50 associate 
i.vs for the remainder of the j ll " ml "' rs - 
year for violation of an order forbid- , The contribution of the club during 
ding drivers of local fire apparatus to tnL ' P ast > var ha-( been a noteworthy 
drive through a red traffic light. Fire- one - The members have given the 
man Noonan was found by Chief De- " 0S Pital $3500 during their |a.;t tiseal 
Courcy to have driven through a red y " ar - They raised this amount from 

their dues and from the most success- 
ful cabaret that they presented in 
Winchester last January. In addition 
to this contribution, many pieces of 
linen, that the superintendent reports 
as needed for hospital use. are made 
at the meetings, all of which are sew- 



HARRINGTON REPORTS VCTIVI- 
TV IN WINCHESTER REAL 
ESTATE 



ana 

is somewhat 
-priced homes, 
ster real estate is 
stment and that pur- 



traffic light at the junction 0 f Church 
and Bacon streets Sunday afternoon, 
Nov. 9, when Engine 3, which he was 
driving, was in collision with a 
('handler sedan, drven by Mrs. Emily 
Latremore of 11 Lawrence street. 
.Mrs. Latremore was injured and was 



Miss ( AROLYN I). SMILEY 
TO SPEAK AT FIRST CONGREGA- 
TIONAL CHURCH SUNDAY 
MORNING AT 10:.10 



•The Orient in Revolution" 

Mis-; Carolyn D, Smiley, associate 
editorial secretary of the American 
Board i;f Commissioners for Foreign 
Missions, has just returned from a 
I I months' tour of mission stations 
around the world, during which she 
has studied at first hand the educa- 
tional pha-.es of missions. Interviews 
with Mahntma Gandhi, whom she 
terms thu "Prophet of India;"' Toyo- 
hiko Kagawa, internationally known 
Japanese Socialist, laobr leader and 
novelist; outstanding christian na- 
tionals in India. China, Japan and 
Turkey; and Kumiai Church leaders 
in Japan, have given Miss Smiley an 
intimate knowledge of international 
foreign mission and a well-informed 
world outlook. This wealth of infor- 
mation she will interpret to Ameri- 
can audiences from lecture platforms 
and through church publications. 

Miss Smiley lir.-t left American 
sod in 19H3 to serve an eight year 
term as a missionary teacher in 
.American Hoard Girls' School at 
Ahmednagar, India. Before return- 
ing to America she completed a 
seven months' tour of Burma, Ma- 
lay, Java, Ceylon, Egypt, Constanti- 
nople and Europe, during which she 
studied schools, colleges, and student 
life. The tour just finished included 
France, Turkey, India, Ceylon. China, 
Japan and the Philippine Islands. 

From India, where she attended a 
National Congress meeting at La- 
hore, Miss Smiley brings many beau- 
tiful hangings and costumes which 
she will use in lecture work. She has 
made 7000 feet of moving picture film 
portraying every phase of Indian life, 
as well as scenes from China. Turkey, 
Japan, Ceylon .and the Philippine Is- 
lands. "My object is to bring to 
America n knowledge nf the beautiful 
things of India," says Miss Smiley. 
"We have heard far too much of the 
dark side of the country and few 
people realize its marvelous beauty." 

Miss Smiley is the daughter of 
Mrs. James H, Smiley of Symmes 
road, Winchester. She was born in 
Riverside. R, L. where her father was 
a Congregational minister. After 
one year in Middlebury College, she 
transferred to Mt. Holyoke, where 
she was graduated in 1912, and she 
then taught in Marion and Williams- 
town for a year and a half. After a 
special course of study at the Theolo- 
gical School in Berkeley, Calif., she 
sailed to the foreign field. 

The public is invited. Dr. Chidley 
will conduct the worship. 



taken to the 
from which 
discharged. 

Fireman No 
duty after the 
the following 
Courcy. The 
a hearing, and 
Monday evening; I 
the Ik aring being 
men' 



Winchester Hospital | m ? meeting 
she was subsequently 



man was relieved from 
accident and suspended 
morning by Chief De- 
former petitioned for 
ne was granted last 
by chief DeCourcy, 
held in the Select - 
room-. Fireman Noonan was 
n presented by Attorney William E. 
Ramsdell. chief DeCourcy, who was 
the complaining officer, was repre- 
sented by Town Counsel Addison R. 
Pike. 

Fireman Noonan testified that he 
failed to see a red light, but did see 
that the light changed from green to 
amber. He claimed that Mrs. Latre- 
more's sedan came out of Bacon l 
street, ami slowed down near the j 
middle of the road and then started 1 
again. He stated that hi' did every- ! 
thing possible to avoid an accident. 
Other witnesses. Fireman Alexander] 
W MacKenzie and Harry Crown, cor- 1 
roborated Noonan's statement that he 
did his best to avoid an accident, but j 
differed with him on the lights 011 the 1 
traffic beacon. i 

Mrs. Latremore did not testify nor ! 
did anyone speak at the meeting in j 
her behalf. Chief DeCourcy. who j 
heard the case, reserved his decision ' 
after the hearing, but in accordance 
with civil servce regulations notified 
Fireman No. nan of his decision yes- 
terday. The two weeks date from the 
original suspension following the 
accident. 

The order, which Chief DeCourcy 
found Fireman Noonan guilty of vio- 
lating, was issued Nov, <!. 1929, and 
relates to the Traffic B aeon at Bacon 
and Church streets. In substance it 
orders drivers to come to a full stop, 
if red light shows and then to pro- 
ceed with caution. 

As a result of the recent accident 
Chief DeCourcy has issued a new 
( rder which is as follows: 

"Drivers of Fire Apparatus shall 
not drive the apparatus past a sig- 
nal light in the center of the town, 
if showing amber or red, unless a 
police officer on foot is near the 
light to signal the driver to pro- 
ceed through. 

"Drivers shall not pass to the left 
of an electric car at the junction 
of Mt. Vernon and Main streets 
if street is blocked on the right 
side unless signalled to do so by an 
officer." 



Last year the $1000 that the club 
gave the hospital provided for the 
supply of linen. The additional 
was spent by the directors for im- 
provements that would distinctly ben- 
efit the patients who use the hospi- 
tal. Five hundred dollars fitted up a 
premature room that could accommo- 
date and care for three babies. This 
room has been in constant use since 
it was equipped. 



One th. 



new dietitic 
equipment wi 
and teaching 
their study of f< 11 II. 
thousand dollars went t 



pense of the add 
ward, 

a delightful 



d dollars furnished the 
laboratory. This new 
improve the ir; inir..: 
given the students in 
preparation. One 
ward the ex- 



Edward T. Harrington. Inc., reports j 

tnat m spite of th.- much-talked-of 
I OBfiness depression, there is a contin- 
| uai demand for Winchester real es- ! 
i t«e by those who appreciate the ad- | 
I v »ntages of living in such a town 

althougrh this activity 

confined to modei n. low 

they believe Winch 

still a sound inve 

chasers or tenants will be found" foi 
the residences now offered for sale or 
for rent in the near future. 

For Elizabeth K. Abbott, they have 
sold her 9-room residence at 7 Symmes 
ryad. The purchaser was Herbert E. 
Marston, formerly of Scituate, who is 
now occupying the premises as a 
home. 

They have sold to Robert M. Keeney 
the new Dutch Colonial residence at 
3 Che3terford road for Kenneth G. 
I ierce. Mr. Kenney is a teacher in 
our Winchester schools and is now 
making his home at the above address. 

Mrs. Frank Barnard, formerly of 11 
Fletcher street, is now occupying the 
new Cape Cod style residence' on Sal- 
isbury road, which purchase was ar- 
ranged through the Harrington office. 

They have also sold to Wallace K. 
Craves, formerly of Brookline, th 
tractive residence of earlv N 
land Colonial type 
road, who 



ELKS HELD CHARITY BALL 

Usual Big Crowd Attracted to Town 
Hall 



COMING EVENTS 



. Fr 

iya) 



lay, Rosrutar meeting ,.f Win- 
Vrvh Chanter. Masonic A part- 



Winchester 



their 
la ru e 
Town 
Charity 
events 1 
Last 



Lodge of Elks with 
es and friends gathered in 
numbers last evening in the 
Hall for their ninth annual 
Pall, always one of the big 
'f the late fall season, 
evening's affair was fully in 
keeping with the high standards set 
in pa.-t years, ami followed closely 
the usual program of events. 

An excellent vaudeville program 
opened the evening, the acts being 
in charge of "Joe" Harry of Arling- 
ton, widely known in Elks' circles as 
a member of Everett Lodge. Barry, 



Nov 
cheate 

mentfl 

Nov 
under 
Nov. 
Christian 
at H o'clock 

Nov 21. Monday The regular meeting 
the Fortnightly wltl be held at 2:80 n 
Dr Albert II Gaii 



St. Friday. Panee at Calumet Club 
luspiees of Winchester Boat Club. 
21, Friday evening. Free leeture on 
Science in Town Hall, Winchester, 



the Town Hall 

m ak on th» "New Fashioned Home. 

8 p m Town 
presents 



of 
nt. in 
will 



Circle 



Hull. 
•Oh 



team 
a top 



live 
erved 
com- 



a member of thi famous radii 
of Barry and Keane promised 
notch entertainment and fully 
up to his word. Arthur Fields 
as master of ceremonies. Tin 
plete pro-ram included: 
1 

Ginger Gordon Cabaret Blues Singer 
II 

Silent Mora Musician Extraordinary 
111 

Barry and Keane Harmony as you like ii 
IV 

Arthur Fields Monologist 
V 

Plunkett, Archer iin.I Ray Head line dnnci 
team in Brut Boston appearance after Nev, 
1 ■ rk cngagemi tit 

, Following the entertainment pro- 

!L__ :\ alls _ b . ury U'ram, the hall was cleared by Jani 



N 
St 
kio 

Pec, 
Teacher 
sembly hall at 

. vening will be All-, it II Gag* 
field. All parents ,.f hi K h 
cordially invited tn attend. 

Dance itid Brite, First Congregational 
Church Parish House. Call Win. 0841 f„ r 



v. 26, Wednesday, 
Mary's Dramatic 
Dancing. 

"!, Tuesday. High School Parent- 
Association meets in high whool as- 
n m. The speaker ol the 
P D of Wake- 

School pupils 



tickets. 

Dec. 8, Saturday, 
Hall at :'. and 8 p. 
Parent Teach, r A ■ ., 



H>r,l Pictures In Town 
hi Auspices Wadlelgh 
ietion. 



NOTICE 



Next Thursday being a holi- 
daj advertisers and correspond- 
ents are requested to get all 
copj to the Star Office a- earlv 
in the week as possible. 



, ew 



at- 
Eng. 



ertTala 0 n omT ^ I hi- assistants 

They report the sale for Mabel E. til \ JZT^-^ continue(1 " n " 



on 



addition to the children's 
recently completed, making it 
>n:l sunny ward for its 



little patients 

The Winton Club is arranging a 
masquerade dance to be given on the 
evening after Thanksgiving and plans 
are underway for a cabaret later in 
the year. The directors of the hospi- 
tal apnreciate very much the generous 
contributions of time and monev from 
the club. 



td 1 o'clock this morning. Fred 
Strachan's Elks' Orchestra, which has 
so often pleased Winchester audiences 
furnished the best in dance music, 
and the hall was covered with danc- 
ers until well after the midnight hour. 

' - Country*Da/ ScKi J^uS^ SVrKr ° 

ir.- being made for the ! ter wis led this 
erection of a croun of attractive h< 



ROTARY CLUB 



Jones of lot No. :.l Euena avenut 
which another of the attractive Cape 
Cod houses has already been started, 
and the sale for Daniel W. Kimball of 
the large piece nf vacant land on 
Palmer street adioininir th 

whereon plans 

croup of attractive mms. 
es, all of which will be reproductions i 
of the most attractive of early New, 
England types of architecture. A 
number of Winchester families have I 
already arranged for the purchase of 
land in this section or the purchase of! 
one of the attractive homes. 

For the George McQuesten Com- 1 
pany, they have sold lot at 12 Indian ! 



We -hall most assuredly miss out 
meeting which is regularly scheduled 

for next week, but which the club : Hill road, off High street, to Charles I 
voted to omit ..n account of the fact ' L. Giffin of Medford, who has already 
that it falls on Thanksgiving Day. commenced the erection thereon of ail \ 
On that day we will reflect that one of' attractive Colonial house in antioipa- 
the big reasons for giving thanks is I tion of having it finished for the early 
the tact that we are privileged to serve spring demand. 

as Rotarians. They report the sale of the property ' 

"I-red" took good care that the club j known as !• Winthrop street to Law' 

rence M. Sible 



of Elks' parties in Winches- 
was led this year by Exalted 
Ruler John F. Donaghey and his sis- 
ter. Miss Mary F. Donaghey. Fol- 
lowing came the . tTui-rs of the lodg< 
with their ladies ami a long line of 
merrymakers. 

At the stroke of 11 there was a 
pause in the dancing for the impres- 
sive "11 o'clock toast" always pro- 
posed at Elks' gatherings throughout 
the world in honor of "the absent 
toast this year in 
delivered by John 
R. of Winchester 



CHRISTMAS ISSUE DEC. 12 



The annual Christmas issue 
of the Star will be published on 
Dec. 12 this year. As usual this 
edition will contain extra pages 
and special holiday features. 
Merchants desiring space should 
notify this office immediately. 



The 

was 



E. 



HIGH SCHOOL IN FINAL (HMD 
(JAMES 

Plays Saugus Tomorrow and Woburn 
on Thanksgiving 



should not lack the cheer that is tra- 
ditional at this season. The excellent 
lunch which he served was a welcome 
foretaste of what we expect next 
Thursday in different surroundings. 

The club maintains its splendid at- 
tendance record. Twentv-siv of out 
members were present last Thursday. 
We feel certain that the two absentees 
will not allow our entire month's rec- 
ord to fall Ir low 100 per cent, where 
it. now stands. 

We were again delighted to enter- 
tain a large delegation from Reading. 
It would surely be pleasing to have 
this as a regular feature at our meet- 
ings. 

The <dub is in receipt of an invita- 
tion from The Rotary Club of Fra- 
mingham to the effect that our mem- 
bers are requested to attend a concert 
to be Riven by The Boys' Hand, snon- 
sorcd by The Framingham Club. This 
concert will be p-ivon Monday even- 
ing, Nov. 21 and no admission will be 
chn rged. 

Principal Wade L. Grindle of the 
Winchester High School addressed the 
club after luncheon. Mr. Grim" 
plained for us the duties 
nihilities of a seho ( 



A CORRECTION 



ir 



urred in the Star's re- 
ef the selection of .lanet Nichols 
ft wing on the AH Boston public 
ml. honorary field hockey team last 
k, In our article we stated that 



t hi 

ntin, 



An 
port 
as | ( 
scho 
w 

Janet is cantain of 
ball team at high s 
learn is incorrect. 1 
one of the few girls ti 
letters in three snorts, 
contain. nnH we regret 
which withcld from her recognition of 
the distinction which is hers. We o-ot 
our information from a source which 
we though! was authentic, and we are 
sorry that we were misinformed. Lo- 
retta has made an enviable athletic 
record at high school and the Star 
would be the last to deprive her of any 
credit which is her due. 



girls' basket- 
. and this we 
■tta Carleton, 
i win varsity 
is basketball 
the mistake 



Winchester High School closes its 
current football season with two 
games, meeting Saugus High on Man- 
chester Field tomorrow afternoon at 
'! o'( lock, and playing Woburn Hitrh at 
Woburn at 10:15 on Thanksgiving 
forenoon. 

For several years the locals have 
been meeting SaugUS and have gener- 
ally proved too good for the boys j ter seho< 
down Lynn way. Stoncham won from The R 
Saugus by l!> to 0 so on paper at least convinced that the gr« 



the locals are favored tn win. 

The Woburn game on the holiday is 
something else again, and the fact 
that the Tanners lost at Watertown 
makes the Star view the battle as 
pretty much of an even thing. If Wo- 
burn had won last Saturday we would 



IX- 

and respon- 
executive. Long 
before he finished we were able to un- 
derstand why he is so .successful in 
the conduct of our High School. A 
thorough knowledge of his work and 
the ability to utilize that knowledge 
for the Upbuilding of his department 
have made Mr. Grindle a most valu- 
able link in the chain of the Winches- 
system. 

tarv Club of Winchester is 
tt majority of 



■y who intends to occupy 
| the premises as a home. Freeland E, 

Hovey was the grantor. 
I The new Cape Cod style home at 
I 11 Euclid avenue has been sold 
I through this office to Dr. Emerson C. 
■ L. Priest, who has purchased for im- 
i mediate occupancy, 
i For Lillian E. Campbell, they have 
j rented the half-duplex house ' at 11 

1 Fletcher street to E. R. Glidden. 

; For Emma B. Parshley, they have 
rented her attractive bungalow at 5 

\ Marshall road to William E. Clark. 
B. o. Mauldin of Baltimore, Md.. 

1 has rented through this office one-half 
the duplex house at 8 Mason street of 

: Esther I'. Lovett. 

| They have rented the upper apart- 
ment at 16 Park road. Winchester for 
Richard W. Wyman to T. E. Chilcott, 

They report the rental to Jose Ser- 
rano of Chile. South America of Miss 
Louisa F. Parkhurst's residence at 
142 Forest street. 

They report they have rented for 
D. C. Brown his residence at 22 
Symmes road to Ernest F. Cray of 
Boston. 

For Amy P. Wild, they have 
ed her residence at 5 Sheffield 
Winchester to William M. fir 
formerly of Atlanta. Ga., who 
occupying the premises as a home. 

They lenort they have rented for 
Edward Sharp it Son suite 1. at 1 
Lewis read to Eva L. Bovd ami suite 

2 at 1 Lewis road to Dr. John E. Her- 
lihy. 



brothers." 
Winchester 
McNally. I 
Lodge. 

Exalted Ruler John F. Donaghey 
was in general charge of arrange- 
ments for the hall with E. I.. K. 
Charles A. Farrar serving as chair- 
man of the committee, the members 
of which were as follows: 

John McNally, 1'. E. It. 
Fred I). Clement, I'. E. 11 
George T. Davidson, P, K It. 
Maui ir,- Dinneen, I'. K. H. 
Fred H. Scholt, P. E. R 
George II. Lochman, P. K. R. 
Thomas F, Fallon, P. E. R. 
Bernard F. Cullen, P. E, R, 
Everett I'. Hambly, !■". I K. 
Leo .1. Finnegan, K. I.. K. 
Arthur .1. Harty, Esquire 
I> .1. Trudeau, Treasurer 
Joseph H Peel, 1. G. 



OCR OFFER 



In accordance with our usual 
custom, all new subscriptions to 
the STAR received up to the 
firs! of (he year, will be given 
a January lirst dating. This of- 
fer applies only to new subscrib- 
ers who have not previously 
taken I Irs paper. Subscribe now 
and receive the remaining issues 
this year free. 



play 



Harry Chitel 
John K. Fitzgerald 
Nils F. Anderson 
Robert II Sullivan 
Fred F. Croto 
William V. Croto 
Stephen I'". Rurnes 
Edwnrd II. Merrill 
Itufus A. Somerhy 
Henry A McGrath 
Charles .1. Harrold 
Jehu .1. McCarthy 



John F. Sullivan 
Joseph A. Scott 
Harry W. Dotten 
f,awrenee I). Nichol 
Frank .1 Nagle 
Harry W. Stevens 
Norman H. H? 
John McCarron 
Howard A. Urownell 
.lames IV Donaghey 
.lames Bradley 
Andrew Flaherty 



TOWNIES AT DEDHAM 

Winchester Town Team will 
■ t with the Dedham Town Team this 
; Sunday afternoon at 2:30 at Dedham 
There will be no game here on 
I hanksgivmg with Woburn, the local 
management being unwilling to meet 
the financial demands of the Tanners 
who have been organized for about 
three weeks. Manager AmiCO expects 
to book a good attraction for the hol- 
iday and the kiekoff will lr. at 2:30. 

WINCHESTER GIRLS MEET MEL- 
ROSE FOR DIVISION TITLE 



i.i i 



WINCHESTER CHORA!. SOCIETY 
IN CAMPAIGN FOR ASSOCI- 
ATE M EMBERS 



rent- 
.1 road, 
ownlee. 
is now 



our townspeople will find countless 
reasons for giving thanks on the com- 
inc holiday. To those of our citizens, 
ami indeed to all citizens, who have 
been well niirh crushed by sorrow and 
misfortune we express the fervent 
h '""' that "Dame Fortune" and their 
unhesitatingly pick Winchester, for own staunch -mils will lead the way to 
its record for the season is the better better days "just around the corner" 
of th,. two schools'. I Attendance for Nov. 13—100 per 

Winchester, however, will have to cent. 

guard against over confidence at Wo- ' 

burn on the holiday, for it is a safe | STATE FEDERATION 



TO PREACH AT CHURCH OF THE 
EPIPHANY 

It will be of interest to many to 
know that Dr. John W. Wood, execu- 
tive secretary of the Department of 
Missions under the National Council 
of the Episcopal Church will preach 
at the Church of the Epiphany, Sun- 
day, Nov. 2:? at 11 o'clock. 

Dr. Wood is a layman who has giv- 
en his life to this work and has held 
the position for many years. He ad- 
justs difficulties in our Mission sta- 
tions, specializing in foreign lands. 
Over and over arain he has been sent 
to China and lately has returned from 
Liberia. Naturallv under the condi- 
tions, he knows bis subject well and 
it will be tn th" benefit of all who 
hear him on Sunday. 



bet that the Tanners will play their 
best game of the year against Win- 
chester, and at their best the Woburn 
bovs are no setup for any ball club. 

The Tanners and Winchester are not 
so far apart on comparative scores. 
Roth played scoreless ties with Ar- 
lineton. and Woburn scored a single 



FERENCE 



CON- 



Mrs. Harold P. Johnson will pre- 
side at the eighth district conference 
of the Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs. Mrs. Car! L. 
Schrader, president, when it is held 
in Medford on Tuesday, Doc. 2 at 



point mere against Wakefield than did i 10:30 a. m. The Medford Women's 
the locals. Melrose ran tin 32 points j Club. Mrs. Frank W. Prte, president, 
on Woburn to 20 against Winchester, i will welcome the conference to their 
but th,' Tanners were able to score on ' clubhouse on Governors avenue, 
tie- Red and Cray. Winchester, how-; The morning session will be given 
ever defeated Watertown which in , over to short talks by the Stat? 
turn won from Woburn. Playing at chairmen of the departments and dt- 
Wohurn gives the Tanners a big ad- visions, who will conduct round table 
'•nntage, and so the done is all scram- [discussions from 12.25'until 1 o'clock. 



COLLEGE CLUB STI !)Y GROUPS 

The Winchester College Club offers 
two study courses, with meetings to 
begin in January. Miriam Wood Ilas. 
eltine of Bi Imont, a Smith graduate 
who has done advanced work at Har- 
vard and Boston Universities, will 
i lead a croup in "Modern Develop- 
! merits in the Theorv and Application 
of Psychology." Mrs. Hasoltine is 
the mother of several children and 1 
worked for some years with the Judge 
1 Baker Foundation in Boston. 
! An evening group for husbands and 
! wives will study "Russia." Roth 
i these groups are open to persons in- 
terested who are not members of the 
College Club. For furthr information 
j write o r telephone Mrs. Wm. E. 
: Spaulding, 37ft Main street. Win. 
0025-W. Although meetings will not 
i be"in until January, the programs 
and membership are now being ar- 
i anged. 



The Winchester Choral Society, 
now busily engaged under the direc- 
tion of J. Albert Wilson in preparing 
for the first concert of its second sea- 
son, to be given during January, be- 
gan its annual campaign for associate 
nvmhors this week. 

President Carolyn Draper Gilpatric 
announced that lettt rs were being sent 
to all those now holding associate 
membership in the society and to 
many prospective members. 

These associate memberships are 



Winchester High School girls" fo ld 
hockey team plays Melrose High this 
afternoon at 2:30 on Lasell Field, 
Newton, to decide the championship 
of the Northern Division 0 f the Inter- 
scholastic Field Hockey League. A 
previous game between the two 

schools resulted ill a scoreless tie. 
The winner of this afternoon's game 
will meet Arlington, winner of the 
Southern Division title, for the in- 
terscholastic champonship. 

MRS. CATHERINE M. M AN 

Mrs. Catherine M. Kean. wife of 
Thomas J. Kean of Linden street and 
a widelj known resident of Winches- 
ter foi tlv p af ,t :>,n years, died early 
yesterday morning at her home after 
a long illness. 

Mrs. Kean was born in St. John. 
New Foundland. hut as a girl came 
to the United States and settled in 



vital to the cont uni on f the s < t> Win< . h( ,. ti „, whi( . h town sh . had sin „. 
since they provide the chief ; 1 n,ad,. he- home. She was actively 

backing for the chorus. The directors jf , entifipd w|(h th(> w ,„. k of gt Marv .; 
,,f the society hope that all those who \ Parish am] wag u mpmber f gt 
are interested , n fostering good vocal Mary - a Married Ladies' Sodialitv. 
music in Winchester will become as- ShG was a member am1 Das , om ,.,. r 
sociate members and interest their of )h( . Winchester Court, C. D. of A . 
friends in becoming members too. ; an( , was a]so a mvm \ )( , r of th( . L <■ 

B. A. of South Boston. 

Surviving are her husband, five 
daughters, Mrs. Wallace Eason, Mr-. 
Albert Lawton. both of Winchester; 
Mrs. H. F. Ro>a! livint' in Penn- 



The dues are four dollars a year 
and entitle the member to two tickets 
for each of the societv's two concerts 
given in Winchester. The society feels 
that it is offering its associate mem- 



bers something really worth while in , sv lvania: and the Misses Frances and 
return for their nvne 

an increased enrollment una .*«•«.. • ; sons 

mimes of all associate members aD- ] Laurence R Kean of Winchester 



■• 1 Mvivainu. ano lie- .viisses r ranees aoo 

ey and anticipates | Dorothy Kean of Winchester: and two 
ient this year. The SO n S) Daniel J Kean of Woburn and 



M. C. W. (.. NOTES 



pear in th" concert programs. Send 
checks to the society's treasurer, Miss 
Martraret E. Randall. 19 Everell road, 
or any member of the society will re- 
ceive your application. 



The funeral will he held Saturday 
morning .'it 8:1") from the late resi- 
dence, 11 Linden street, with a solemn 
requiem hitrh mass in St. Mary's 
Church at 0 o'clock. Interment will 
be in Calvary Cemetery. 



"Johnnie" Morten of Winchest 'r, 
who has starred at fullback for th<- 
undefeated Rivers School fiotball 
team this fill, won th? Hunting, pass- 
ing and dash events Wednesday at the 
Rivers qualification meet for the r»ri- 
vnte school football meet, held today. 
Morton, a big rng"ed boy. who gav 1 
promise last vear while rlay ; ng with 
Winchester High of developing into 
quite an end, has been the big offen- 
sive throet of th" first undefeated 
eleven in Rivers' history. 



lib d again. At all events, the game 
looms as a real battle. Winehester- 
Wohum meetings arc always like that. 
Fnch school considers a win over the 
other as indicative of a successful sea- 
k n, and both will give everything 
'hey have to bring that win back 
h ime. The Woburn field is behind th ? 
hieh school building and may be 
-each^d by Montvalo avenue out of 
the square. Kick-off at 10:1"<. 



Rev. Fr. Clarence A. Macksey of 
St. Teresa's Church. North Everett, 
will preach at the devotions to S*. 
R'ta. to he held this evening in St. 
Rita's Church. Lowell. Father Mac 1 '- 
sev is a Winchester boy and sung h ; s 
first mass in St. Mary's 
three years ago. 



Luncheon will then be served in the 
lower hall, tickets for which may be 
secured from Mrs. Cora B. Grant. 21 
Traincroft, Medford; phone Mystic 
5027-M. 

The afternoon session will open at 
2 o'clock with iTeetint's from Mrs. 
Schrader. and choral singing by the 
Isabel Arnold Dame Music Club. 
Past president. Mrs. Azel A. Pack- 
ard will bring erecting* from the 
General Federation: vice-president. 
Mrs. John H. Kimball, will sp^ak 
about headquarters and Mrs. Herman 
A. Hardincr. vice-president, will talk 
en Federation extension and interna- 
tional relations. 

A musical program will b° e'ven 
by Miss Elizabeth Norcroff Allen. 
Church harnist; Miss Ruth Abbott, violinist; 
and Miss Blanche Page, pianist. 



The following are 
the Winchester M. < 
semi-annual conci rt 
Hospital. Sunday, 
entertainer, assisted 



:o-operating with 
. W. G. for their 
at Holy Gho-t 
J. A. Mahoney, 
bv Frank Dona- 



Miss Katherine J. Donnelly of this 
town is one of 16 registered nurses, 
recently appointed to rill vacancies on 
the staff of the Community Health 
Association. Boston's organization of 
visiting nurses. 



Dr. George A. Barron is reported 
as having been confined to his home 
on Winthrop street for the past two 
weeks. It will be another week be- 
fore he is able to be about again. 



hue: Miss Helen Mahler, prima don- 
na. Rosena Gross;, soloist; A. J. Fa- 
rina, comedian: A. Guprina, come- 
dian, assisted by T. F. Barrett. Lil- 
lian Tarskiss. topical songs; Jesse 
Kelli v. magician. 



' Mr. C. L. Morton of 140 Massachu- 
| setts avenue. Boston, well known 
j about town as a hosiery salesman, 
j was taken suddenly ill yesterday 
I noontime while eating his luncheon 
' in B. F. Callahan's Ice Cream pa lor. 
i He was removed to the Winchester 
i Hospital by E. P. Sullivan, Tnomas 
! Murphy and Traffic Officer John H. 

Noonan. He was attended by Dr. 
' Richard W. Sheehy and found to be 
| suffering from a shock. 



Union Thanksgiving Service 

at the 

CHURCH OF THE EPIPHANY 

Next Sunday Afternoon, 4.30 o'clock 

SERMON BY REV. J. WEST THOMPSON 

Continuing the custom of our fathers and in humble 
gratitude to Almighty God for His blessings, let the people 
of Winchester gathei in this service of thanksgiving and 
worship. 



2 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 21. )930 




LADIES' AID SOC IETY SPON- 
SORED FALL BAZAAR 



It Is Not Too 
Join Our 1931 



Late To 
Tax Club 



OCTOBER DIVIDEND ON REGULAR DEPOSITS 
AT THE RATE OF 

5% 

Winchester Savings Bank 

WIN CHESTER, MASS 



26 MT VERNON ST. 

BUSINESS H0URS;8AMT03PN 




SATURDAYS 8AW0ieM:7J0 830 PM 



2TC 



NCORPORATED 1871 



Ffaturintf a pee-wee golf course 
and an interesting tea-cup reader, the 
annual fall bazaar of the Ladies' Aid 
Society of the Crawford Memorial M. I 
E. Church, held last Friday in the La- 
dies' Parlor and upper half, turned out 
to be one of the most successful yet 
sponsored by this resourceful organi- 
zation. : 

The usual booths and tables were ' 
arranged about the parlor and in the | 
hall with a most attractive tea room, ' 
in which the decorations were worked 
out in evergreen, 

Among the particularly interesting | 
features were indoor golf in the pri- 
mary room, under the direction of Mrs. | 
Vincent P. Clarke; the tea-cup read- i 
ing of Madame Jeannette. the surprise 
table containing many gifts from 
prominent people, including Mrs. Her- 
bert Hoover and Mrs. Frank G. Allen; i 
the grali with a real old-fashioned j 
oaken bucket, in charge of Mrs. An- | 
drew MacDonald; and the sample ta- 
ble in the form of a huge hat box. in | 
charge id' the Mis-es .leanne Thomp- | 
son. Ruth LeRoy, Marjorie Brownell , 
and Margaret Thompson. Mr. W. A.] 
Snow had an interesting exhibit of 
"Torrid Heat" oil burners. 

A delicious turkey supper was 
served in the evening under the di- ! 
rection of Mrs. C. Raymond Bancroft, i 
Mrs. A. B, Bent served as general 
chairman of the bazaar with Mi>s Ed- ! 
na M. Johnson as treasurer. 

The table chairmen were: 

Aprons Mr-. Fred Wildberiter, Mrs. Nor- 
man Hitchcock. 

\V.>t ]honi|'<on. Mr» 



Kell^y & Hawcs Co, 

funeral Directors 

LADY ASSISTANTS 



SERVICES RENDERED IN ANY PART OF STATE 
TELEPHONES: WINCHESTER 0035— 4 174— 4106 



Service, with us, means anticipating the needs and desires of 
our patrons so that they need not concern themselves about the 
slightest detail beyond telling us their wishes. 




Lucille Perry Hall 

SCHOOL of DANCING 

Ballet — Tap — Musical Comedy — Ballroom 

Coaching of Amateur Productions 
Dancers Available for Clubs and Entertainments 
Circular sent upon request 
Telephone: Kenmore 6118 
12 HUNTINGTON AVE. (Copley Sq.) BOSTON 



i 



i GRADE CROSSING NOTES 



BurprlBc Mrs. J. 
Charles I!. Swhih. 

<;ift.- Mrs. A, I' 
O»borne. 

■I'm and 60c Mr! 
Roland It Carter. 

Candy Mrs. J:im< 
Trott. 

Fruit Mrs. I- rank 
Ft*nnimort*. 
Supper Mr- *1 Raymond Bancroft 
<;..ir Mr-. Vincent P. Clarke. 
Tea Room Mi-. \ D. Nicholas, Mr-. Fred 
WildberRer, Mrs. Norman Hitchcock. 



Welburn, Mrs. Norman 
Benjamin Miner, Mrs 
Whiting, Mrs. Ednar P. 
RoberU, Mrs. Frank 



Your Holiday Bridge Party 

will be a real success if you choose your prizes from our 
varied and unusual selection of the newest ideas. 

WHIST AND BRIDGE PRIZES 25c to $1.50 

Winter Sport Champions 

are strong for the Ace Sport Cap. It has just the warmth 
and speed and flash they want. No other cap fits so 
sleekly to the head. No other cap has the vavid up and 
down color stripes. 

BOYS' CAPS 75c— GIRLS' CAPS $1.00 



I 



The center crossing was turn up ■ 
I j Sunday, a broken rail at the north- 
j erly end being the attraction. The: 
; i traffic jam was etc.. etc.. etc. 
• On Wednesday afternoon a broken 
j I rail near the electric car cross-over 
■ was thi' cause of digging up the 
| center crossing. A piece of rail about , 
i a foot long could he lifted out and i 
i nut back in place by anyone able to I 
; lift a 50-lb. weight. The traffic jam \ 
I was ( tc. etc., etc. 

NOTE— There are many people 
who think that the lady who imagines 
| she can turn her car around the traf- 
'< lie sign at the crossing should take 
j 25 seconds more and drive around the 
( 'onimon. 

The center crossing was dug Up 
again yesterday forenoon, it being de- 
cided in view of the broken rails re- 
rectntly found there to replace anoth- 
er rail in front of the gate-tenders' 
shanty. 



I 



Winchester Dry Goods Co. 

540 MAIN STREET TEL. WIN. 2255 



I 



MRS. (CATHERINE WELSH 

Mrs. (Catherine Welsh of Medford, 
formerly of this town, died Sunday 
evening, Nov, 16, in a Boston Hos- 
pital where she had been ill for the 
past six weeks. 

Mrs, Wel-I, was born in Winchester 
in 18!)3, the daughter of (Catherine 
and the late John Clark. She was 
educated in the Winchester schools 
and made hi r bom.' here until 1920 
when -he removed to Medford, She 
leaves her husband, Francis H. Welsh, 
six children, her mother, Mrs, (Cath- 
erine ( lark of Winchester, and two 
brothers, Gordon Clark of Medford 
and Philip Clark of New York City. 

The funeral was held Wednesday 
morning from the late residence 31n 
Albion street. Medford, and a high 
mass of requiem was celebrated in 
St. Clement's Church in that city. 

^ Mr, and Mrs. Chester McNeill and 
Frances Pettingell spent last week-end 
at Plymouth. X. H. They attended 
the New Hampton-Tilton came. 



LEGION 



TO STAGE WRESTLING 
CARNIVAL 



1 wish to thank my many friends 
who havi aided in making the Beauty 
Nook a success by their patronage 
the past season. Others will appre- 
ciate their Beauty Culture in these 
quiet and exclusive surroundings ind 
at prices most reasonable. Jane L. 
Pease, the Beautv Nook, 3 Myrtle 
street, tel. Win. 0804-W. 



iarn 
Le- 



Sport fans will be glad to 1 
that Winchester Post, American 
gion, is again to sponsor the indoor 
wrestling carnivals which have been 
so popular in past seasons. The tirst 
of this winter's shows is to be staged 
on Friday evening, Pec. ■">, in the : 
Town Hall and the committee is at | 
work upon plans which will ensure I 
patrons a card of high class grap- I 
pling by the best amateur and pro- j 
fessional talent available. 

The complete card will appear in 
next week's issue of the Star, the : 
committee being unwilling to an- 
nounce the names of several top 
notchers until it is absolutely certain j 
that they will appear in Winchester. 

A regulation ring has been se- 
cured and will be pitched somewhat 
lower than previously for better vis- 
ion. A licensed referee has been se- 
cured, and a show comparable to the 
best in Boston is in the making. Don't 
miss it. 



$ 



5 



Will put in an electric floor p.ug 
in any room on the hrst floor of 
your house. 

E. C. SANDERSON 

THE ELECTRICIAN 
Tel. 0300 



Washed Thoroughly! 

. . . that's the secret of CLEAN clothes 

No matter which of our Services you 
choose . . . from the low-cost Damp 
Service (Wet Wash) to those com- 
pletely finished, you can be sure of 
methods that protect your clothes, and 
you of absolute cleanliness. 



assure 



CALL WINCHESTER 2100 




Winchester Laundry Division 

Converse Place. Winchester 

Launderers Cleansers Dyers 




Packard 

Appearance and 
Protection 



DRESS TOP 
SIMONIZE CAR 
LACQUER ALL FENDERS 
WASH CAR 
LACQUER ALL SIM. ASM 
APRONS 
PAINT RUST SPOTS 
L VCQUER BUMPERS 
VACUUM INSIDE 
POLISH NICKEL 
PAINT TIRE KIMS 

$40.00 

MAKE YOUR CAR 
LOOK LIKE NEW 

Anderson Motor Go. 

666 Main St., Winchester 

METROPOLITAN GARAGE 
632 Main St. Win. 1053 

Chrysler 












i ! 

! Iff You Like Good Things • 



WINCHESTER CONSERVATORIES 

INCORPORATED 

— Two Stores — 

Main Store and Greenhouses 

186 Cambridge Street 
Phones: Win. 1702. Win. Otinft 

ARNOLD SHOP 

1 Common Street Phone Win. 0205 



For RHEUMATISM take 

BUXTON'S 

RHEUMATIC SPECIFIC 

You will not reer*t it. For sale at Hrvry'n 
Pharmacy. Let u» «*nd you a booklrt. Huiton 
Rh.umatir Mrdinnr Co., Abbot Village. Mr. 



You'll Buy 
A. A. MORRISON'S 

FINE CANDIES 

and 

Home Made Pastries 

Made in Winchester 
Fresh Every Day 

Clara Catherine Candies 

A. A. Morrison 
19 M l . VERNON STREET * 
TEL. WIN. 0966 j 
j 



HALL'S MARKET 

75-77 PLEASANT STREET MALDEN 

Importers of 



From Lunhan Bros., Cork, Ireland 

Distributors of 

S. S. PIERCE FANCY GROCERIES 
SWIFT'S GENUINE SPRING LAMB, GOLDEN WEST FOWL, 
PREMIUM CHICKENS. HEAVY WESTERN BEEF, 
NATIVE PORK 

i.LM-tf 



AND I WOULDN'T, 
HAVE TO COME 
TO A FOOL 
BANQUET TO 

GET WARM 



IF I HAD SENSE 
ENOUGH TO 

PHONE 
0903 
AND GET 




TO INSTALL A HEATING 
SYSTEM THAT WILL 
KEEP MY HOME 
COMFORTABLE 



The finest AFTER DINNER SPEECH ever made is delivered 
in a man's home, when he says "THIS house certainly is 
warm and comfortable." 



FELLS PLUMBING AND HEATING CO. 

656 MAIN STREET WINCHESTER, MASS. 



ANNOUNCING A 



Sensational Factory Sale 

Offering Our $20,000 Stock of Upholstered Wicker 
Furniture at Wholesale Prices and Less 

SALE NOW ON 

Unparalleled Values in Fine Reed and Rattan Furniture 

LIVING ROOM SUITES— SUN ROOM SUITES 

INDIVIDUAL PIECES AND NOVELTIES 

Woven Reed Stick Reed Burnished Rattan 

THE VERY LATEST STYLES AND FINISHES 
An Unlimited Choice for the Modes! Home or the Finest Estate 
COME DIRECT TO OUR FACTORY 

REAR NO. 388 MAIN STREET, WAKEFIELD, MASS. 

Opposite Public Library 



THE JORDAN - WAKEFIELD CO. 



CHAIR MAKERS FOR 10 YEARS 



nl4-2t 



PHARMACY FIRST 

KNIGHT 

WINCHESTER SQUARE WEST, AT CHURCH STREET 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1930 



3 



IIII!]!"!',,!!'!!, I. 
■ ! 1 '■■ 



: ';; m i. 



K 



! 



Holiday Season 

Clark Jewel Range Sale 



n 



$10 
Allowance 
for your 
Old Range 



Many Colors and 
Models to Choose 
from 




$10 
Hrst payment 

Balance in 17 
equal monthly 
payments 



All ranges equipped with 
Loraine Oven Heat Con- 
trol and Insulated Oven 



Arlington Gas Light Co. 

Tel. Win. 0142 



527 Main Street, Winchester 



{..; ■■rwuMo X^iiiiiiiL : 



ill 



jiilUiiuiLiiuki 



j i . 



.............. 




CALUMET CLUB NOTES 



Announcement was made this week 
of the opening of a men's bridge 
tournament :it the club. Straight 
bridge is to be played and no two of 
the better bridge players of the club 
are to be paired together. The 
tournament will be held on Wednes- 
day nights, but it' the contestants are 
unable to play on that night they may 
play any .it her week night except 
Saturday. 

A player who is unable to attend 
on a scheduled night may have a sub- 
stitute play fur him, his score to 
count mi the team. If a substitute 
plays he will he entitled to partici- 
pate in the weekly prize. 

The tournament will open Dec. •'! 
and will continue through December, 
January and February. I.. Harold 
Smith. Charles S. Harry and Forest 
1,. Pitman are the committee in 
charge. 

There is to he a dance at the ehih 
this Friday evening, "Ed's" Harmony 
Hoys will furnish the music. The af- 
fair is informal and members and 
their friends are urged to attend. 

The first ladies' afternoon bridge 
is to he held at the club on Tuesday. 



Dee. 2, The ladies are asked to make 
up their tahles now and plan to at- 
tend the coming series. Mrs. Harris 
S. Richardson is in charge. 

Mrs. Vernon Hall was in charge of 
the afternoon bowling for the ladies 
on Tuesday. The prize winners were 
as follows: 

llnrh Single Mra, Lincoln. 

Hull Sinuli' with Handicap- Mr- Pitman. 

Mitch Total Mrs. Cox. 

Hitch Total with Handicap Mrs. Dinsmore. 

Another afternoon of bowling for 
the ladies will he held next Tuesday 
at - o'clock, 

W. L. Caldwell won the Thanks- 
giving turkey roll. His score was 
106, 129, 138 .'IT.'!. He received a 
tine bird, which he will enjoy next 
Thursday. 

In this week'.- .Mystic Valley games 
Calumet took Maiden into camp to 
the tune of 10 to 5, The next match 
in the league is to he held on Mon- 
day. Dei'. 1, the Medford club visit- 
ing Calumet. 



lllillllllllllllillillililiMili 







HELD FOR GRAND JURY AFTER 
THEFT OF CAR 



On their 
ehesier the 
1 1. -ion with 
land avenue 



way north through Win 
Nash had figured in eol- 
Began's Buick at High- 
and Main streets. Aban- 



50TH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY 



I wo young men and two girls are 
awaiting trial by the Grand Jury af- 
ter then- arrest in Wilmington with 
an automobile which the Winchester 
police say was stolen from tins town 
early Sunday morning. The events 
which led up to their capture by 
Special Officer Field- of the Wilming- 
ton Police are interesting. 

At 1 : 1 2 o'clock Sunday morning, 
I Thomas F. Began of .-,7s Hast Eighth 
street, South Boston, reported at Po- 
lice Headquarters that as he was driv- 
ing his Buick sedan down Highland 
avenue into Main street, a Nash sedan 
crashed into his car at the junction of 
the two roadways. The Nash did not 
stop, hut its registration was secured 
and given to the authorities, A young 



la 



riding with Began sustained an 



PUBLIC HEARING ON WATER 
TOWER 



The committee in charge of beauti- 
fying the water tower at Symmes 
Park, at the southern end of High- 
land avenue, has announced a public 
hearing to he held on Monday even- 
ing, Dec. 1 at S o'clock in the small 
Town Hall. ,T. Harper Blaisdell is 
chairman of the committee. 



T. F. Kennefick 

Roofing and Metal Work 
of All Kinds 



Office at A. Miles Holbrook'i 



24 CHURCH STREET 



TEL. WIN. 1250 



fUtf 



HAVE YOU THOUGHT ABOUT 

Thanksgiving Dinner? 

It is Krp»t fun t.> have a big get-together nt h. mo on that >lny, but it is also 
a lot of work. 

This year you may welcome a change from your usual custom. If you Would 
like to steal quiolly aw y with your family, and have a real Thanksgiving dinner 
in real old New England *urrounding», you will just love it at 

THE MANNING MANSE TEA TAVERN 

BUILT IN 16M 
U NORTH HIU.KKK A. MASS. 
iFour Mllet the Boston Sidr from Lowell) 

Antique in Setting Most Modem in Service 

Owing to on,- limited seating capacity and to the numhtr of reservations al- 
ready in hand, may we suggest you call our hostess, Mrs. Morn-, for a reserva- 
tion for the approximate time you wish to be served, at Billerica 4a-4 



Price Per C( ver $3.00 



EARL G. MANNING, Proprietor, 
President, Manning Association 



injury to her arm and was treated by 
Dr. Milton J. Quinn. 

Sergt. Thomas F. Cassidy and Pa- 
trolman Charles Harrold started out 
to comb the neighborhood and soon 
came upon the Nash abandoned on 
Highland avenue near Euclid avenue. 
The machine was registered to Max 
Kertzman of 99 Park avenue, Med- 
ford. who reported to the Somerville 
police that his sedan had been stolen 
from Otis street in that city. 

Meanwhile a telephone message was 
received at Headquarters, stating that 
a Chrysler convertible coupe, the 
property of A. M. Lyman of 359 High- 
land avenue, had been stolen from in 
front of the residence of W. R. Lord 
at 2~ I'ark avenue. The police quick- 
ly connected this theft with the party 
or parties figuring in the previously 
reported accident and lost no time in 
broadcasting a description of Mr. Ly- 
man's machine. 

About s o'clock Sunday morning, 
Police Chief William H. Roeers was 
notified that the Chrysler had been 
recovered in Wilmington and that the 
Wilmington authorities were holdintr 
two young men and two girls whom 
thev had found with the car. 

Chief Rogers went at once to Wil- 
mington and brought the quartet to 
Winchester where they were locked tin 
at Headquarters. The men gave their 
nanu s as Thomas E. Wallace. 20, of 3 
I exington avenue, Charlestown, and 
Frank Carpenter. 19. of 24 Main 
street, Charlestown. The girls rave 
their names as Rita Mahoney, 18. of 
7s~ Fulda street. Roxbuvy and Mar- 
garet Gallagher, 17. of 17 Sprague 
street, Charlestown. 

At first the authorities were unable 
to get much of anything out of the 
young people, but finally Chief Rogers 
succeeded in getting a coherent ae- 
I count of the quartette's adventures. 
According to the police the young 
men and gir's had met at Broadwav, 
Somerville, both havine previously 
bten members of other oarties. They 
had lacked a car. so had stolen a 
Chevrolet coupe foe a ride. Later 
they had left the Chevrolet and had 
tnU-on H N'ash «o<lnn which thev found 
on Otis street in Somerville, the same 
sednn which Mix Kpfman snorted 
stolen to the Somerville police. 



doning the Nash, the quartet had got- 
ten into Mr. Lyman's car at Park 
avenue, and had driven to Wilming- 
ton where the police say they entered 
a dwelling house and a camp in the 
.Silver Lake district. 

About s o'clock Sunday morning 
they pulled into the yard of a dwell- 
ing and the Chrysler became stuck in 
the sandy soil. Ooing into a nearby 
store, run by Special Officer Fields 
of the Wilmington Police, the quartet 
sought assistance to get their car out 
of the mud. A machine was procured 
but proved unequal to the task of ex- 
tricating tl'.e coupe. 

A crowd gathered and while the at- 
tempt was being made to move the 
stranded machine the men and girls 
were identified as having recently left 
one of the Silver Lake camps. A chock- 
up was made and the registration of 
the Chrysler quickly was identified as 
that of the ear reported stolen by the 
Winchester Police. 

Chief Rogers was notified and 
quickly went to Wilmington where he 
took the young people into custody. 
They spent the day and night in the 
local lockup and appeared in the Dis- 
trict Court at Woburn, Monday morn- 
ing, The young men were charged 
with the larceny of the Chrysler and 
Wallace, who the police say was driv- 
ing the N'ash car when it crashed in- 
to the Buick at Highland avenue and 
Alain street, was charged with leaving 
the scene of an accident without mak- 
ing himself known. In addition, both 
young men were charged with break- 
ing and entering in the night time 
with intent to commit larceny. 

The girls were charged with break- 
ing and entering in the night time 
wth intent to commit larceny. They 
were held in bonds of $2000 each for 
appearance before the Grand Jury. 
The young men's bonds were fixed at 
$2500 each, the extra $500 being for 
the larcenv of the car. It is likely 
that the Somerville Police will also 
present charges on the theft of the 
Nash sedan from that city. None of 
the four could raise the bail demanded 
and were locked up at Fast Cam- 
bridge to await trial. 



Oak Knoll, the 
this town, 
the treasurer of 
been a t ru- tee of 
for nearly Li."> 



Mr. and Mrs, Lewis Parkhurst of 
this town celebrated on Tuesday, Nov. 
IS. the 50th anniversary of their 
wedding, Two hundred friends at- 
tended a reception from 8 until 10 
in the evening at 
Parkhurst home in 

Mr. Parkhurst i.- 
Ginn & < 'o. and has 
Dartmouth Colli li, 
years. 

The guests included college and 
business friends as well as neighbors 
and old citizens of Winchester. 

Among the guests were President 
Ernest AI. Hopkins of Dartmouth 
College and .Mis. Hopkins; President 
Franklin W. Johnson of Colby Col- 
lege and Mrs. Johnson; Judge ami 
Airs. John R. Mac Lane of Manches- 
ter, N. H., and Mr. Thomas W. Proc- 
tor of Boston. 

Other guests were Hon. A. (). 
Brown, formerly governor of Now 
Hampshire, Air. and Airs. Wm. D. 
Parkinson of Fitchburg and Air. and 
Airs. A. P. Sawyer of Lowell. Air. 
Brown, Air. Parkinson ami Air. Sawy- 
er belonged to the class of Dartmouth 
'7s of which Mr. Parkhurst was a 
member. 

Many of Air. Parkhurst's business 
associates were present with their 
wives including Air. George Plimp- 
ton of Tuxedo Park, a trustee of Am- 
herst, and Airs. Plimpton; Mr. H. H. 
Hilton of Chicago, a trustee of Col- 
by; Dr. c. H. Thurber of Boston, a 
trustee of Clark University, and Airs. 
Thurber; Air. Selden Smith of Cali- 
fornia, a trustee of Mills College at 
Berkeley; Mr. Frederick C. Hodgdon 
of New" York City, a trustee of Tufts 
College, and Mrs. Hodgdon: Air. N. 



;('. Miller of Atlanta, Ga„ a trustee 
; of Emery College; am! Air. AI. II. 
Jencks of Montclair, N. J.. a trustee 
of St. Lawrence University, and Mrs. 
j Jencks. 

Among those who assisted Air. ami 
j Airs. Parkhurst at the reception were 
'Air. and Mrs, Richard Parkhurst of 
this town, Ali.-s Helen Thomas of 
Boston and .Mr. and Air-. E. Benj. 
Armstrong of Concord. 

The youngest guest was master 
John Wilder Parkhurst, aged 5, the 
first Parkhurst grandson. 



MISS 



MOLLIE 
SERVES 



Ml LK FN AN 
BIRTHDAY 



OB- 



i Friday evening, Nov. u, Mollie 

Mulfenan, 26 Oak street, was very 

pleasantly surprised on the occasion 

of her birthday anniversary. Upon 
I returning from a visit, .Miss Mud- 
I renan was completely overwhelmed 
j to find her classmates and a large 

number of friends gathered at her 

home to extend best birthday wishes. 

Miss Bertha McCarron presented the 
: surprised young lady with a gold 

piece in behalf of the entire gather- 
ling. Aliss Mulrenan responded and 

thanked her guests m a congenial 

manner. 

Games were played and dancing 
was enjoyed. Refreshments were 
served. The guest* at a late hour 
departed after a most enjoyable even- 
ing, once more expressing their best 
wishes for many happy returns of 
the day to Aliss Mulrenan. 



Air. and Airs. James Haley of 
Symmes road and their s,,,,, Frank, 
visited their son. James, at New 
Hampton and attended the annual 
New Hampton-Tilton game. 




TO BANQUET WINCHESTER 
TOWN TEAM 

Arrangements are nearly completed 
for a banquet and dancing party to 
be held on Thursday evening. Dec. 11 
in Lyceum Hall in honor of the Win- 
chester Town fi otball team. Manager 
"Archa" Amico's boys have hung up 
an enviable record in the semi-pro 
ranks this fall, prompting their fol- 
lowers to stage the Dec. 11 affair as 
a reward for their tine showing. The 
committee in charge of arrangements 
for the banquet include .1. Albert 
Horn, chairman; Frank Collins. Gor- 
do Horn and James Farrell. 



POTATO 
CHIPS 



NEWTDN PURE TOOD CO. 



■ . i 
i 1 



See the handsome new line of 
greeting cards for Christmas at the 
Star Office. 



Serve these with your 
Cold Turkey 

m 

Ask for the Chips in the Yellow Box 



ill 




THE WINCHL >TER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1930 



The Winchester Star 

THEODORE P. WILSON, Editor and 
Publisher: WINCHESTER, MASS. 



SINGLE COPIES, SEVEN CENTS 
Left at Your Residence for One Year 
The Winchester Star, $2.50, in advance 

NewH Items, Lotlne Meetings, Society 
Events, Personals, etc., sent to this 
office will be welcomed by the Editor 

Entered «t the pontoffict at Winchester. 
Hum hu»ett«, nerond-clau matter. 

TELEPHONE NUMBER 0029 

The latest addition to the Cape 
highway, a beautiful stretch of road 
from Bridgewater to Fall Brook be- 
low Middleborough, was opened Sat- 
urday, and we shall not need that pass 
ue expected from Arthur Dean. This 
stretch has been under construction 
since early spring and cuts about 15 
minutes off the running time between 
Bridjrewater and Wareham, making 
one of the finest additions to the main 
highway since the reconstruction work 
was commenced several years ago. It 
eliminates the dangerous road through 
the State Farm and the equally dan- 
erous hills each side of Middlebor- ' 
ough. Cape autoists have a welcome 
surprise in store for them next sea- 
son, With the construction of a short I 
stretch between Bridgewater and 
West Bridgewater, Boston will he 
connected with the Cape by the finest 
roads in the State. 



Considering the numerous accidents 
tin' apparatus is constantly meeting 
with in surrounding places, Winches- 
ter has been very fortunate, and that 
our recent accident was not more seri- 
ous may be attributed along with our 
immunity to the c areful driving of our 
firemen." There is hardly an alarm 
rings in but what some negligent or 
willful infringment of every rule of 
safety is indulged in by autoists. 
Within but a short time a lady driver 
turned around at the crossing direct- 
ly in front of approahcing apparatus 
and another operator drove across the 
tracks directly in front of the Chief's 
car. In each case the skillful driving 



of the firemen was the only redeem- 
ing factor and in neither case were the 
obvious offenders stopped, although 
they were vigorously criticised by 
witnesses. With sirens shrieking and 
gongs sounding, autoists drive around 
as carefree as on a Sunday. That 
Winchester has escaped accidents 
thus far is a point of congratulation. 
The book may tell of "CO miles an 
hour to Salem," but the firemen driv- 
ing at 20 miles an hour between cars 
parked from the curb to the middle 
of the street has his hands full with- 
out dodging carelessly driven cars in 
motion. 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



Endicott and Hayden Estey of Win- 
chester were among those awarded 
varsity football letters at Middlesex 
Sc hool this week. The Concord eleven 
won the private school gridiron cham- 
pionship this fall, enjoying one of its 
most successful seasons. 

The (lance which Mr. and Mrs. 
Frederick Manley Ives of Highland 
avenue are to give for their debutante 
daughter, Miss Eleanor Ives, will take 
place at the Algonquin Club on Dec. 
H. Miss Ives is a member of the Vin- 
cent Club and a provisional member 
of the Junior League. 

•I. Edward Downes of Winchester 
has been elected to the Society of 
Illini at Country Pay School. Mem- 
bership in the Illini is open only to 
pupils who have shown proficiency in 
executing all sorts of school duties 
and election to its ranks at Country 
Day is a much coveted honor. 

It is reported that a record number 
of applicants took the recent police 
examinations, including many from 
Winchester. With unemployment rife 
it should he relatively easy to get par- 
ticularly capable men for police duty 
at present. 

Omnibus, the dramatic society at | 
Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, 
N*. V.. will present this week-end a 
melodrama, "Maria Marten, or the 
Murder in the Red Barn." This is the 
first full length production to be giv- 
en in the new Little Theatre at the 
college. Miss Florence Watters of 
this town, is chairman of the Prop- 
erties Committee of Omnibus. 



I had an appointment with 
a man for this morning, ar- 
ranged for less than a week 
ago. I telephoned his office 
to see if he'd arrived. They 
answered he died last night. 



WILLIAM W. HILL, Agent 

Tlu- Northwestern Mutual 
Lift' Insurarire (liirnpnny 

235 Park Square Building 
Boston 

Phone Hancock 3765— Win. 0418 



Ol K RESERVOIRS 



Authorized Dealer 



-IN— 



Elgin Watches 




I 



Our selection of ladies and gentlemen's watches will 
enable you to select the right watch at the right price. 

HENRY BILLAUER 

Front a Family of Watchmakers for Over 100 ^ ears 

327 MAIN STREET W0BURN 

A small deposit will reserve any gift you select un- 
til Christmas. 



$ 20 

delivers 



on 



McNeilly's 

Budget 

Plan 




MODEL 70 Lowboy is finished *| If* 
iu hand-rubbed walnut. _ vf «? 



Golden Voice 

At water Kent 

See and hear the new models of Atwater Kent Golden 
Voice radio at McNEILLY'S! They've attained new heights 
of performance, new depths and richness of tone! The new 
tone control gives 4 definite tone shadings! The Quick 
vision dial, allowing instant readings, is the year's out- 
standing advancement ! 



WE CAN SERVE Vol BETTER 

S. S. McNeilly Co. 

.-.17 MAIN ST.. WINCHESTER 
Radio Service on All Makes 



FREE — FREE 
Broadcast Station 
Directory 

Mail this coupon 
and we will be 
glad to mail 
you one. 



The writer was honored by elec- 
tion to the Winchester Water and 
Sower Board in the year 1916, and 
having resided in Winchester all his 
life, naturally became much inter- 
ested in the details of the Water De- 
partment. Mr. Wlliam T. Dotten, 
the superintendent of the Winchester 
Highlands Water System, rendered 
great and valuable information in 
many ways. 

The writer will never forget the 
surprise occasioned by the following 
statement of Mr. Dotten. He said 
that when the Metropolitan Commis- 
sioners bought the water rights of 
Medford, Maiden and Melrose, pay- 
ing therefor $1,750,000, they at once 
began the cleansing of the bottom of 
Spot Pond, then raising the shores to 
such an extent that the water level 
of Spot Pond Reservoir is exactly on 
the same level with the water of our 
South Reservoir, when full the water 
in Spot Pond was raised nine feet. 

Mr. Dotten stated that a Mr. 
Dwyer, a member of the Metropolitan 
Water Commission at that time, told 
him that the State would some time 
need and take over the Winchester 
Reservoirs for the storage of water for 
the Metropolitan District. Spot Pond 
covers at present 300 acres and our 
reservoirs 1308 acres id' water sur- 
face. Mr. Dwyer stated that there 
would be a connection by an open or 
a closed ditch eventually between the 
Windiest' r South Reservoir and Spot 
Pond. This statement was a great 
surprise to the writer, and so with 
much caution the writer sought in- 
formation from the State Depart- 
ment of Health. 

An eminent engineer of the De- 
partment of Health is a most depen- 
dable friend of the reforestation work 
of our Town, and we are greatly in- 
debted to him for the great interest 
that he has taken in the work. We 
are also indebted to Mr. H. <'. Cook 
ef the State Department of Forestry 
and to Mr. Perry of the State De- 
partment of Agriculture, for their 
timely assistance on several occa- 
sions. 

This ingineer has given the sub- 
ject matter a great deal of thought 
and attention, having visited the res- 
ervoirs several times, and has pro- 
ne unced them to be among the best of 
water sheds in the State. The writer 
is greatly indebted to him for his 
education in forestry work, and sani- 
tarv matters connected therewith. 

This engineer stated that it was on- 
ly a question of time when the State 
would need a larger storage for 
water as the Metropolitan District 
grows in number of inhabitants. The 
increase is stated to be' about 25,000 
per year. 

There is new (or was at that time> 
only IS days' supply of water in 
storage for the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict: 15 days' supply at Spot Pond 
nnel three days' supply at Chestnut 
Hill, Lake Cochituate, Framingham 
and the Weston Reservoirs. Wachu- 
sctt Reservoir is located in Clinton 
and is 35 miles from Boston, and if 
an accident should happen to the pipe 
lines or there should be a convulsion 
of nature, the Metropolitan District 
would be in a serious condition for 
wart ef an adequate supply of water. 

When the Metropolitan District 
shall have 2,000,000 of inhabitants 
there should be. according to their 
statement, 30 days' supply of water 
in storage as a safety measure'. The 
only elevated location near Boston is 
the' Winchester Reservoirs which 
have the most perfect sanitary water- 
shells without, ami which never can 
have, a human habitation located up- 
on them. 

It was stated to the writer that be- 
cause of elevation and proximity to 
the Metropolitan District, our Reser- 
voirs would readily !»■ worth $1,000,- 
000 and that if the Town would push 
to completion the reforestation work, 
that when the State needed an extra 
storage capacity and should take over 
the' property, settlement probably 
would be made by a commission ap- 
pointed by the State, and the value 
would be a very large one, not le^s 
than three or three and a half mil- 
lions of money. 

We have a water supply sufficient- 
ly large to furnish water when we 
shall have 16,000 inhabitants previous 
to the work of reforestation. The 
work of reforestation will conserve 
enough water to supply us when we 
shall have 20,000 people in our town, 
with the enlargnnnt of the present 
water shed and other means of con- 
servation by enlargement of the Mid- 
dle Reservoir. 

If necessary, we can enlarge the 
N'orth Reservoir by placing a new 
dam outside of the present one anel 
increase the watershed by the pur- 
chase if the Fallon Farm. This could 
increase the depth of the North Res- 
ervoir by 15 feet. 

When the State completes the Swift 
and Ware River project, their next 
move Will be to increase their Storage 
capacity, and our Reservoirs are their 
first choice. It will he a money-mak- 
ing scheme for the town to sit tight 




ishirig you a bright 
and happt j r f\ lai lks^ivh iq. 




WINCHESTER NATIONAL BANK 

A Safe and Pleasant Place to Hank 



LUMBER 

Tipical Prices 

Matched Boards $23 M 

SE Boards $25 M 

IK" Perfection Shingles $5.50 tfq. 
Sel. White (tak Flooring $79 M 
No. 1 Com. Oak Flooring $59 M 

4x8 $33 M 

2x6—20 ft. up $33 M 

Hammond Lumber Co. 

210 Eastern Avenue Maiden 
Tel. Mai. 0771 



and let them do the planning. We 
hold the trump cards and can afford 
to let them do the nuyiaging. Our 
town has a right at any time in the 
future, whenever we need water for 
domestic uses, to ask the State for 
an increase in supply and they can- 
not refuse us. for all cities and towns 
located within 10 miles of Boston have 
that right at any time. If we play 
the game sharp they will need our 
Reservoirs before we need their water 
supply. There is a vast difference 
between paying them a large bonus 
for water and their having to take 
our Reservoirs and pay us for them. 

The chairman of the Metropolitan 
District Commission in 1916, Mr. 
DeLaCases, stated to the writer in 
an excited frame of mind, that we 
ought to be forced to take water 
from the Metropolitan water supply- 
and deed over to the State our Reser- 
voirs to be used by them for recrea- 
tion purposes: that our water (at that 
time) was not fit to use, and we ought 
to he forced to take water from 
them. 

We had other thoughts in mind be- 
sides our health conditions. The ele- 
vations of our Reservoirs are approxi- 
mately as follows when full of water 
as above the meen low tide. 

South Reservoir 161 feet same as 
Spot Pond. 

Middle Reservoir 101 feet. 

North Reservoir 110 feet. 

The writer has in mind that the 
above statements may be' e>f service 
to the people of our town within the 
next 10 or 15 years, giving a general 
idea of what some of the State 
authorities have in mind in taking our 
Reservoirs for their own use for 
storage only. 

The 050, 000.000 gallons of water 
that our reservors contain when full 
is of little or no value to the State'. 
The real value consists of sanitary 
conditions, elevation, the possibility 
ef enlargement of the reservoirs and 
the non-seepage from mir ledge 
formed catchment basin. 

The state owns all of the land sur- 
rounding our town property at the 
watershed, which means much to us 
ami of more value to them. 

Our town by actual measurement 
lost approximately 2oO.iioo.oiiO gal- 
lops of water that ran to waste dur- 
ing the winter of 102S and 1929 over 
the wasteways at North and South 
Reservoirs, this great loss of water 
would furnish us with 2nd days' sup- 
ply at the rate of 1,000.000 per day, 
without reckoning the loss of evapo- 
ration. What oueht we to do voters? 

Charles E. Kendall 




Special Week=end Sale 

I DOZ. ROSES $1.15—2 DOZ. $2.00 

I DOZ. CARNATIONS $1.00—2 00Z. $1.50 

POM POMS $1.15 PER BOX 

Cash and Carry 

This sale sponsored by The Allied Florists of New England 
of which we are a member. 



Winchester Conservatories, Inc. 

"THE HOME OF FLOWERS" 

MAIN STORE AND GREEN- 
HOUSES ARNOLD SHOP 
186 Cambridge Street 1 Common Street 
Phones Win. 1702 Phone Win. 0205 
Win. 0690 

WINCHESTER. MASS. 



Upholstering & Furniture 
Repairing 

Cabinet, Cushion, Shade & Mattress Wokr 

HIGH GRADE WORK 

A. E. BERGSTROM 



609 MAIN STREET 



TEL. WIN. 2141 



newsy Paragraphs 



Mr. A. Miles Holbrook has been 
drawn to servo as a traverse juror in 
the Superior Criminal Court at East | 

Cambridge. . . 

Mr Lawrence Lombard was the 
speaker last evening at the hanouet 
of the Congregational Men's Club in 
the First Church parish house. 

New late models in felt velvet ami 
satin. Miss Ekman, IT Church street^ 
(Bailey's.) 



THANKSGIVING DINNER 

BY RESERVATION 

Mistress Mary Indoor Tea Room 

93 WILDW00D STREET WINCHESTER 
TEL. WIN. 0985 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1930 



5 



SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT 
OCTOBER 1930 

Assets 

REAL ESTATE LOANS $2,632,400.00 

SHARK LOANS 85,615.00 

MATURED SHARE CERTIFICATE LOAN'S 3,095.00 

PAID-UP SHARE: CERTIFICATE LOANS 1,880.00 

REAL ESTATE BY FORECLOSURE 19,537.73 

DUE ON FORECLOSURE SALE 88.95 

COMMON FORM MORTGAGE 5,500.00 

TAXES PAID Wi:;.»>. 

REAL ESTATE 8,257.00 

CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT 10,000.00 

CASH • •■l.fi«2.f2 

$2,818,859.35 

Liabilities 

DUES CA PITA I $1,503,269.00 

PROFITS CAPITAI 323,895.46 

MATURED SHARE CERTIFICATES 567,600.00 

PAID-UP SHARE CERTIFICATES 223,800.00 

DIVIDEND ON MATURED SHARE CERTIFICATES 14,190.00 

DIVIDEND ON PAID-UP SHARK CERTIFICATES . . 5,595.00 

INTEREST AND FINES ACCRUED 530.60 

FORFEITED SHARK ACCOUNT 470.29 

GUARANTY FUND 77,503.79 

SURPLUS 67.452.41 

RESERVED FOR FURNITURE AND FIXTURES . . . 6,017.80 

DUE ON CONSTRUCTION LOAN'S 28,535.00 

$2,818,859.35 

Shares in the November Series For Sale 

Winchester Co-operative Bank 



11 Church Street, Winchester 



Willard T. Carleton 
John Chiillis 
Ernest R. Eustis 
Vincent Farnsworth 
George A. Fernald 



DIRECTORS 
James J. Fitzgerald 
Charles A. (Jlea-son 
Daniel W. Hawes 
Alfred H. Hildreth 
James Hinds 



Telephone 1078 

Raymond Merrill 
Curtis W. Nash 
Sewall E, Newman 
Frank E. Randall 
Samuel S. Symmes 



SUNDAY SERVICES 



FIRST HAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Benjamin P. Brown*. Pastor, 31 Church 
street. 



Thar.k*iMvinir Sunday, Nov. 23. 

V:3« A. M. General assembly of church 
school in social hall. Mi>s \V>man will •!>«•■ 
briefly of the work of the West End Com- 
munity House. Last half hour will be <ie- 
voted to study &- h i.. 

10 :45 A. M. Horning worship. Sermon by 
the pastor: "Thank-trivinif in Days of De- 
pression." Music by the quartet, senior and 
junior choiri. 

■", 1' M Meetinic of Comrades of the Cross. 
A Thank You" mw tinil. 

6 P. M.-Y. P. S. C. K.-ThanksKivinir serv- 
ice Leader. Rachel Browne. 

The regular evenintr service will be omitted 
and this church will unitw in the Union 
Thanksgiving service at the Church of the 
Epiphany at 4:80 o'.tock, where Rev J West 
Thompson will be th.- preacher. 

Tuesday. 3:30 P. M. Junior Christian En- 
deavor meets in recreation hall Thanksgiving 
meeting. Leader: "Jack" finger. 

Wednesday, 7 :45 P. M. Prayer meeting led 
by the pastor. "The Thanksgiving of a Grat"- 
ful Soul." Mr. J. Leslie Johnston will be the 
soloist. 



SECOND CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

Rev John E. Whitley, Pastor. 50'! Wash- 
ington street. Tel. Win. OT&ti-J. 

Sunday. 10:30 A. M. The Count of Every 
Blessing. 

12 M Sunday School A donation for the 
Home of Little Wanderers. 

4:30 P. M. -Union Thanksw'ivinvr service 
at th,- Church of the Epiphany. 

Wednesday, 7:48 P. M. Mi, 1-week service. 

This Friday evening. Nov, 21, a first class 
entertainment at H o'clock in assembly hull. 
Snm Tyack, the man of many moods, imper- 
sonator of various characters. 

Th,- Every Member Canvass Is to be taken 
for the support of the church in 1931. 
Pledges will be received next Sunday. Every 
attendant of the church is urged to la* pres- 
ent. 



I lKST CHURCH OV CHRIST, SCIENTIST 

All .Seals I lee 



Sunday, Nov. 23 -Subject, "Soul and Bixiy." 

Sutulll) .School at 1/ o'clock 

Services iii the Church Building opposite the 
Town Hull, 10:40 A. M. 

Wednesday evening meeting at 7:4ft F\ M. 

Reading room in church Building. Open ) 
daily from 12 M. to 5 P. M. except Sundays 
and holidays. I 



LOST AND FOUND 



LOST Hunch ..f keys Friday afternoon. 
Kinder please return to StHr OMicc. 



HELP WANTED 



WANTED Dependable High School Kirl. I 
three afternoons a week. Apply at 1 Ledge- I 
wood road or tel Win. 177.'.. 

WANTED High School vii l one or two ' 
afternoons a week; Protestant preferred. Mrs 
N K Morton, tel. Win, 0993. 



LANDSCAPE PLANTING 
SHRUBS AND TREES 
at the Melrose Nurseries 

A. M. TUTTLE & CO. 

261 Howard Street. 
Melrose Highland. Mass. 
Tel. Melrsse 0042 

mhlf,-tf 



CHURCH OP THE EPIPHANY 

The Rev. Truman Hemiuway, B.D., Rector, 
PI e. U in 1922. 

lleai s Helen I'. Lane. Win. 1336. 

Paiisli House, Win. 1922. 



TO LET 



TO LET Heated rinm on bathroom floor 
4.', Vine street. nll-tf 

KOR KENT Siv room apartment and ™n- 
parlor, fireplace: garage if desired on Park 
avenue. Tel. Win. 1836-M. olO-tf 



First Class Upholsterirg 

BLIP COVERS MADE TO ORDER 
MATTRESSES 
Repair Work a Specialty 

H. J. ROSCOE 

3* CHESTNUT RD. STONEHAM 

Telephone 0472-W 
Reference apN-tf Rrssonabl. 



FOR HUNT (inrage space in private ce- 
ment garage on Maxwell road. Tel. Win. 

lien, " 



TO LET Garage, Single Bcml-hcated tra- 
inee on Governor's avenue. Tel. Win. 2177-M. 

TO LET M"d, rn apartment, suitable for 
dentist, doctor or private family ill Winches- 
ter Riiuare, a.M Main street. Call Highlands 
6328. n!l-4» 



ONE, TWO A Nil THREE ROOM 

Apartments in Stetson Hall 

■ Now ready for occupancy. Rent f IS 
to $90 per month. Every modern con- 
venience, including elevator and re- 
frigersion. APPLY TO THE JANITOR. 



TO LET I arge room furnished or un 
furnished, ver> central: meals optional. Tel. » 
Win. 0739-M. 



SN0WFLAKE GARDENS 

Hattie E. Snow. Prop. 
39 FOREST ST. TEL. WIN. 101*— 1057 



POR HUNT Upper apartment or -i\ large 
rooms anil sun parlor, redecorated through- 
out.. Tel. Win 020B-W. * 



TO LET Ktenm heated room on bathroom 
floor, one minute from center. $2.76 per week 
Call Win. JI17-M or G K.lmwood avenue 



FOR SALE 



FIREPLACE WOOD!!! 



I foot lengths (per cord) 
Cut any length (extra) . . 



.$18.00 
. . 2.00 
$20.00 

Hard mountain growth dried under 
cover. Also, kindling wood. $1100 
ymd $16.00. ROGER S. BEATTIE. 
tel. Wob. 0139. au29-tf 



FIREPLACE WOOD 

VERY FANCY, all cleft good sited white birch 
$1H per cord, 4 ft. lengths: tin sawed . maple 
and oak SI8 per cord. I ft. lengths, $1* 
sawed; kindling wood « bu. $1; 'JO bu. f 3 : 
«fi bu. 15. All wood may be seen in yard at 
r.? High street, Woburn. FrUrell Bros., tel. 
Woburn 0570. sl2-tf 

KOR SALE Apples, Macintosh It, sis. Bald- 
win and Northern Spy. Walter II Dot ten, 
in Alben street, Winchester. Tel. 0726. s5-tf 



Rock Gardens Constructed and 
Planted. Planting of Evergreens 
and Shrubs. Perennial and Alpine 
Plants for Sale. 

THREE PLY ROLL ROOFING 

$1.25 SLATE SURFACED 

Ashpalt Shingles $2.00 a square and up 

lllu.-k Sheet Sleel Ash Can. 6llr each 

Flat W hite Paint 11.00 per gallon 

Hard. Ilry Cord Wood (Hi. Oil per cord 

II. M. A LI'EKIN & CO. 
527 Concord Ave. ( amh irigr. Mass. 

Tel. Porter 15S0— University 8»88 

o31-13t 

AMERICAN GLASS COMPANY 

Glass For All Purposes 

MiRKORS RESILVERED 

.W<> Ferry St. Everett, Mass. 

: Tel. Everett 0911 

Winchester (alls and Deliveries Twice 
Weekly 



Nov. Jit, Sunday next before Advent. 
Preacher, Dr, J, din W. Wood. 
Holy i oimnlinion, H . m. 
Church School, ;i ;30 a. m. 
Moi ning prayer, 1 1 a. in. 
Kindergarten and primary department. 11 
a ill. 

Union Thanksgiving service, 4 ::lt) p, m. 
Preacher. The Rev. J. W. Thompson. 

Tuesday. Nov. 25, 9:30 u. in. Holy Com- 
mumon, 

Thursday. Nov. 2', U :30 a. m. Holy Com« 

munion. 

Meetings 

Tuesday. Nov. 25, 10 a. m. Sewing meet- 
ing; luncheon I2::iu. Miss Mildred Hayes of 
1'orto Rico will speak und show an interest- 
ing exhibit uf Porto Kican handiwork. 

Friday, Nov. 21, 10:16 a. m. Mrs. Nicholas 
Burke, "The Life of Prayer." 

UNITARIAN CHURCH 

Rev. George Hale Reed, Minister. S Ridge- 
field road. Tel, Will. 11424. 

Sunday. Nov. 2:1 Public service of worship 
at 10:45. Mr. Heed will preach. Subject: 
"If We Forget," a sermon for thn Sunday 
before Thanksgiving. The primary depart- 
ment of the Sunday School, including the hln- 
dergai*ten through the third grade, will meet 
at KliJ",. The junior department, Including 
the fourth grade through the eighth, will meet 
at 9:3(1. The Metcall Union will meet in the 
Meyer Chapel at 12. The music for the morn- 
ing church service will be as follows: 

Organ Prelude Priere Clausarnann 

first Anthem Sing Alleluia Forth ... Ruck 

Second Anthem In Thee O Lord 'lours 

Organ Postlude Poatlude In C Major .. Elgar 

Sunday. Nov. 23 -The Union Thanksgiving 
service will be held in the M thndl»t Chur«h 
at 7 p. m. Mr. Thompson will be the speak- 
er. It is hoped that many ol the in. ml., . .• ,,i 
our Society will attend. 

Tuesday, Nov 25 All day sewing meeting 
in the parish house. Box luncheon. 

Saturday, Nov. 2'.» Annual entertainment 
and dance upunsored by the Metcalf Union, to 
he held in Metcalf Hall at r p, m. Dancing 
will follow the entertainment. 

The noon-day service held iii King's Chapel 
Boston, will be in charge of the following 
men on the following days: Nov. 25. 2fi and 
2s, Rev. Boynton Merrill. I). I)., Second Church 
Newton. Nov. 27, 1 1 a. m.. Thanksgiving Day 
service, Rev. John Carroll Perkins, D.D., 
King's Chapel. 



WINCHESTER TRUST COMPANY 

WINCHESTER MASS. 




MEMBER OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



CONDENSED STATEMENT 

as rendered to the Comptroller as of the close of Business Sept. 24, 1930 

RESOURCES LIABILITIES 

( ash and Due from Hanks. .$ 197.428.13 Capital $ 100.000.00 

l\ S. Bonds 219.370.94 Surplus and Profits 2S2.324.79 

Other Stocks and Bunds ... 1.099.(580.99 Reserve for Taxes and In- 

Loans and Discounts 1,113.400.81 terest 11,500.00 

Banking House 62,509.36 Reserve for Amortization 

and Depreciation 32,727.95 

Deposits. Commercial 1,163,169.10 

Deposits, Savings 1,102,668.29 

$2,692,390.23 $2,692,390.23 
Officers 

RALPH E. JOSLIN, President CHARLES E. BARRETT, Treasurer 

FREELAND E. HOVEY, Vice President G. D WIGHT CABOT, Assistant Treasurer 
FRED L. PATTEE, Vice President HELEN M. MONROE, Assistant Treasurer 



CHARLES E. BARRETT 
CUTLER B. DOWNER 
J ERE A. DOWNS 
GEORGE A. FERNALD 
HENRY C. GUERNSEY 



Directors 

H. WADSWORTH HIGHT 
PREELAND E. HOVEY 
RALPH E. JOSLIN 
JAMES NOW ELL 



WILLIAM L. PARSONS 
FRED L. PATTEE 
EDWIN R. ROONEY 
FREDERIC S. SNYDER 
CHARLES H. SYMMES 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



KOR SALE Vttrdctive two family house 
centrally limited, hivh class residential sec- 
tion, five :«;nl seven rooms, all modem ; small 
down payment: price low. Tel Win. nr,2i-W. 

FOR SALE MnrtKaRee «ill sell a new, 
well-built Wmrh, ster home, containing six 
rooms, porch anil nara«te. Firs! floor is 
finished in uuTOWond, with fireplace in the 
livinvr-room. Bathroom with shower Trice 
$;:iiiii Small amount down ami balance In 
f)r«t m'trtiraRC. Tel. (.'enter Newton 3161 
after 6 p, in. * 



MISCELLANEOUS 
SECRETARY-STENOGRAPHER 

With over ten years' experience and 
living in Winchester would accept 
work as public stenographer or do 
private typing one or two evenings 
a week. Write Box Y, Star Office. 

nll-Jt* 

CURTAINS AND DRAPEKIES All kinds 
made to order. We do hemstitching. Perry. 
16 rieaxant street, Medford. Tel. Mystic 
M71-J n«-tf 



ICE 

HORN POND ICE COMPANY 
Tel. Woburn 0310 



CHICHESTER S PILLS 

*9T THE IHAMOMt It HA N I). 

Ladlrat Ask], 
t'hl-chea-ter I ' 
fills In Hid 

boss!, tea)e<l 
Take no olker. 

llrniil.U Ash'ofriri-CirtH-TRRfl 
IHaV«in» IIKANII IMI.Lm, let •» 
reus known as liest.Ssfsst.Alwsyj Rsllsl it* 

SOLO BY DRUGGISTS EVERV WKEJtF 

i.6-lyr 





SECOND MORTGAGE LOAM) muiie from 
our own funds We also buy mortgage notes 
or lend on them as collateral. We are not 
brokers ami your dealing* are solely with us. 
Mystic Valley Mortgage Co., 7 Forest Street. 
M.slfo-d 1'honc Mystic "02(56. jaS-tf 



SITUATION WANTED Experienced wom- 
an desire* general housework. itoo<i cisik. will- 
ing worker: references. Tel Win. 014R. • 



POSITION WANTED Young woman de- 
sires position as mother's helper, can do some 
coking. Tel. Maiden 2289-R. • 



WANTED General housework, practical 
nursing or care of elderly person; Doctor's 
reference. Tel. Wolnirn 0541. • 



Phone 1766 Established 1891 

R. E. BELIVEAU 

Formerly A. E. Hentstrom 
UPHOLSTERING AND FURNITURE 
REPAIRING 
Cushion. Msttresa and Shade Work 
Kefiniahinf 
Decorative ( hairs Made to Order 
16 Thompson St. Winchester. Mass. 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



WANTED N.ar Symmes corner, v'aras'e 
space for one car. George Hale Reed, 8 
Ridgefleld road. 



POSITION WANTED Competent chauffeur 
wants position and willing to help around 
place. Tel. Win. 1475-M nU'l-St* 

WANTED A typewriter in ^i-h1 condition, 
Tel Win 2066-R 



Mrs, N. K. Butman gave a small 
bridge party last Friday nitrht for 
her two nephews, Sidney and Loren 
Chisholm. The two prizes wire woti 
by Madeline Oliver of Lexington and 
Murray Mercer of Oxford street. 



Mrs. H. B. Metcalf of this town is 
one of the directors of the Huston 
Association of Smith College Alumnae 1 
which held its first meeting of the 1 
seasi 11 Wednesday afternoon at the 
college club in Boston. 

Charles V. L. Smith of Winchester, 
son of Mrs. Mabel L. and the late 
Charles F. Smith of Hillside avenue, 
was one of the 40 students recently 
elected to Phi Beta Kappa at Har- 
vard. Mr. Smith concluded tin excel- 
lent scholastic record in hi-rh school 
by being chosen valedictorian of his 
class, and he has continued his line 
work as a student at Cambridge. 

Mr. T. Grafton Abbott of Rangeley 
was one of those honored at thr loth 
anniversary dinner of the Huntington 
avenue branch of the Boston Y. M. C. 
A., held Tuesday evening in Bate- 
Hall. Mr. Abbott" was the third chair- 
man of the branch board. 

Diaries at the Star Office. 

Lieut. -("ol. Paul 1!. Moulton re- 
turned home this wick after a hunt- 
ing trip to South Dresden. Me., with 1 
a bit: deer and five ducks. 



Crawford Memorial 

METHODIST ICI'lMt tii'rti • II I < It) 'II 

Corner Church and I >i x streets Kev, ■' 
Wesl Thornl'Siili, .Minister. Resilience, llll Dlx 
street. Tel. Win. I163U-M. 

Church School at !' ::!0. Men's Class tautrht 
by Prof. Kenneth Reynolds, other well or- 
ganize,! classes and departments for all a^,s. 
A cordial welcome. 

Morning worship at imlifl. A Thanksgiving 
service with special music appropriate t>» the 
day. Sermon subject; "The Myst*r« of .1 -sos " 
Trumpet solo: "The Recessional" by DeKoven 
by Mr. Cleon Hopkins. 

Kpworth League at 6 o'clock. A good social 
time and interesting discussion t>criou 
all young people, Topic: "Sundnv Sport 
Right or Wrong?" Kern Tremherth and Ha- 
rold Hatch will lead the discussions. 

Sun, lav The Union Thanksgiving service 

will be held at 4 Ml at the ' Church of the 
Epiphany. Rev. J. West Thompson will preach 
the sermon, 

Monday The November meeting of the 
Methodist Social U n jon will !«• Students' Night 
with address by Dr. Ernest F. Tittle, of Chi- 
cago. 

Tuesday— The next meeting of the kpworth 
League Institute will be hold in Reading. 
Reservations and details about transportation 
may be had ftl the League service Sunday 
evening*. 

Wednesday The rehearsal of the junior j 
choir «i!l be held at 8:46 this week on Wed- 
nesday instead of Friday, All juniors are | 
asked to come. 

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

Rev. Howard .i Chiclley, D.D., Minister. 
Resiilenre, I eri.wav. Tel. Win 0071, 
Mr. Jay A. Wabeke, assistant. 

Morning worship at lo-iuc Miss Carolyn P. 
Smiley will speak on "The Orient In Revolu- 
tion." Dr. t hi, Hey will conduct the ser\ ice. 
Th ■ children's sermon will be "Wild Geese." 

Sunday School Visitors are always wel- 
come. The departments meet as follows: 
10:30 to 11:45, kindergarten and primary de- 
partments i 'j : J i ■ to 10:20, junior department, 
grades 4, 5 and «. Kipley Chapel: 12 to 1. 
intermediate and senior departments, grades 
7 and s and high school, Ripley Chapel. 

Young People's Society will holil a North- 
field night at their meeting at 6 p. m. in Rip- 
ley Chapel. John Irish will lead. The spcak- 
, rs will bo Mr. Lobingier, Mabel Tompkins. 
Olive Oale, and William Higgins. 

Mid-week service Wednesday at 7:45 Mr. 
Wftbeke'a subject will be "The Glorious Herit- 
age" 

The annual Union Thanksgiving service will 
be held in the Church of the Epiphany Sun- 
day afternoon at 4:80. Rev. J. West Thomp- 
son, pastor of the Methodist Church, will be 
th' preacher. Our peeiple are asked to unite 
with the other churches in this service. 

The Biography Club will meet with Mr 
Chidley in the secretary's office Tuesday even- 
ing at T -A',. The booh to he discussed is. "The 
Story ..f St. Michele" by Munthc. Visitors 
will be welcome to this discussion. 

Group 9, dance an,l bridge in the social 
hall of the parish house, Friday evening Dec. 
a at s :30. 

The dry strength of the new House of R p- 
resentatives will be in exeeaa of :io<i and in the 
Senate well over Ti). a majority greater than 
that mustered by prohibition when the 1-th 
Amendment was submitted for ratification. 



The Arlington Gas Light Company 
added to its reputation as a communi- 
ty organization by putting several lo- 
cal men. who were unemployed, at 
work this week. 



Showing of felt and velvet hats by 
Miss M. A. Shivreff. An attractive 
line of Christmas cards and handker- 
chii fs. Common street, Winchester. 

"Johnnie" Murphy of Mystic avenue, 
end on the past two Winchester High 
School football teams and a three let- 
ter man at that school last year, was j 
at end for Exeter in the annual Exe- 
ter-Andover game at Andover last 
Saturday. Participating against An- , 
dover gives the Winchester boy his . 
coveted "K," and those who saw the 
game report that his playing was all ; 
that could be desired. 

Another former Winchester star , 
who has been going well on the col- 
lege gridiron is "Skin" Kendrick who 
has been just about the best all around 
back on the Bates College freshman 
team this fall. "Skin" has been play- ! 
ing halfback and has aroused the in-! 
terest of the varsity coaches at Hates 
as possible material for the college 
eleven another year. 

A memorable day was spent by 
Mr. George W. Franklin of this town 
on Thursday of this week when he | 
attended the ceremonies attending 
the inauguration of a new system of 
milk production at the Walker-Cor- 
don laboratories of the Borden Re- 
s"arch Foundation, at Plainsboro, j 
N. J. 

We have just installed the last word 
in a Permanent Waving Machine and 
are now prepared to give you the la- 
test and best in Permanent Waving. 
The Idonian Beauty Shop, National 
Bank Building, tel. Win, 1 n2t-tf 

Miss Virginia Merrill, who is now 
attending Boston School of Physical 
Education, visited several classmates 
of last year at Connecticut College 
over the week-end. 

Maurice Tompkins of Cabot street 
spent last week-end at Tilton School 
Henry Brown, who attended that 
school last year, also visited Tilton 
over the week-end. 

Clifton "Bus" McNeill ended bis 
football career for this year by play- 
ing an excellent game for New Hamp- 
ton Schmd which beal Tilton 12 to 6 
last Saturday afternoon. At his posi- 
tion of left tackle he has played the 
entire game during the whole season 
and has done much toward helping his 
team to win. 

Please buv your Christmas Tuber- 
culosis Seals in Winchester as the 
town receives no money from seals 
bought outside its town limit. Sale 
opens Nov. 27. . 

Help to make a Merry Christmas 
merrier for our undernourished chil- 
dren bv buving Christmas Tubercu- 
losis Seals in Winchester wh.:n the 
sale begins Nov. 27. 

Mr. Frederick S. Snyder of Batchel- 
der & Snyder, whoso Winchester home 
is „n Mvopia Hill, has been named 
bv Governor Frank G. Allen to serve 
on the committee concerned with 
studying and finding a solution for | 
the 'unemployment problem. 

Mr. Franklin E. Gregory of Forest j 
street returned last Sunday from a 
hunting trip to Med way. Me. He 
brought with him two of the largest 
deer taken from the Maine woods . 
this season. 

Rev. William S. Packer of Yale 
strett was the guest speaker at the 1 
Boston Field Hockey Association ban- 
quet Tuesday evening in Perkins Hall, 
the Women's Educational and Indus- 
trial Union Boston. Mr. Packer has 
been a pioneer in promoting general 
athletics for girl- and is much in de- 
mand a* a speaker upon subjects in 
this field. 

The will <>f Freeman Nickerson, late 
of Winchester, as filed last Friday in 
the Middlesex Probate Court at Fast. | 
Cambridge, leaves an estate of ?:$o,000 
to the widow. Mrs. Georgianna Nick- 
erson. The will was made in Boston, ■ 
March 7, 1880, and was never altered. 1 



Flowers For Thanksgiving 

Gorgeous 
Chrysanthemums 

Yellow, Pink, White, together with Pom Poms — and other 
suitable flowers to grace the Festive Board. 

PRICES ARE MUCH LOWER THIS YEAR 

Quality Unexcelled Abundant Supply 

PLEASE PLACE ORDER EARLY TO INSURE 
DELIVERY THURSDAY A. M. 



Winchester Conservatories, Inc. 



THE HOME OF FLOWERS" 



MAIN STORE AND GREEN- 
HOUSES 

186 Cambridge Street 
Phones Win. 1702 
Win. 0690 



ARNOLD SHOP 

1 Common Street 
Phone Win. 0205 



WINCHESTER 



Imagine your embarrassment 



WHEN YOUR WIFE" 
FINDS THE BILL 




IMAGINE YOUR SURPRISE— to know this: 

We have very large Cold Storage Rooms where we store fur coat--. 
Cool dry air ; s continually circulating at a temperature of 32 . The 
fur coats are now being taken out and we have this Cold Storage 
space available for any of our customers who wish to have their 
summer clothing: cleaned and placed in Cold Storage. NO Ml \RGE 
FOR THE COLD STORAGE. This is of particular adavntage to 
those who live in apartments where closet space is limited. 

Try it and »ee how pleased you be. 

E & R CLEANSING and DYEING COMPANY 

SMART ST. st 209 MASS. AVE. 
TELEPHONES UNIVERSITY 1170-1171-4172 
CAMBRIDGE. M \SS. 

INCORPORATED IM8 



■J 



6 



THK WINCHESTER, MASS. STAR. FRIDA\, NOVEMBER 21. i930 



APPEAL TO THE CITIZENS OF 
WINCHESTER 

The Winchester Community Relief 
Committee has investigated anil 
found that there are l\L i lamihes 
«hat should be taken care oi at 
Thanksgiving. 

Many of these families have from 
four to eight children and unless this 
committee is able to furnish these 
families with Thanksgiving baskets, 
ihe holiday will pass as another hun- 
gry day in their lives. 

The churches and the Benevolent 
Order of Elks have agreed to do all in 
their power to help relieve those itl 
need, but in order to make this 
Thanksgiving a real 100 per cent day 
«f relief in Winchester it will be nec- 
«ssary for those of us who have been 
blessed with more than our actual 
.needs to donate some of our surplus 
to these needy ones. 

You will enjoy your Thanksgiving 
■with a greater degree of happiness 
if you have helped bring a little sun- 
shine into the lives of these unfortu- 
nates at this holiday season. 

The Winchester Community Relief 
•Committee appeals to you to send to 
the Winchester Congregational vestry 
on Wednesday, Nov. 26, anything that 
you may l>e able to give in the line 
of things to eat. Groceries, vegetables, 
canned roods or preserves are es- 
pecially desired. If you cannot send 
them to the church, but would like 
to have some one call for them please 
call Mr. (i. T. Davidson, tel. or 
Mr. N. M. Nichols, tel. o7i'»:!-W and a 
messenger will be sent to receive 
your donation. 

Although this year is one of busi- 
ness depression, yet the need is so 
great, that it is necessary that all do 
their part to make this Thanksgiv ing 
in Winchester a real season of thanks 
to Him who said. "Give and it shall 
be ^iven unto you." 

Winchester Community 
Relief Committee 

Mr. George T. Davidson, 

( 'hairman 
Nathaniel M. Nichols, 

Secretary 



C. D. OF A. NOTES 



On Monday nitrht in Lyceum Hall 
the Court conducted its annual truest 
night for the children of the mem- 
bers. Although the weather was for- 
bidding, those who attended were 
amply repaid by the following excel- 
lent program: 

liilly Con Ion. MasUr of Ceremonies 
"VuKabond MlnatrelV' 

Dorothy and Elinor Rowen 

Reading Helen Swymmr 

Dance Brother King 

Mechanical Doll Impersonation 

"Hobby" Conlon 
Reading — "Slater'i Beat Feller" 

Mary Donovan 

"Reuben and Rachel Sketch" Marjgaret- 
Mary McDonald an.] .Sara Doherty 

Piano S..I.I Victoria Johnson 

Vocal Duet with Banjo Accompaniment 

U'.sa ami Mary Todd, Stoneham 
Dutch Novelty Song and Dane..* 

Senna Sisters, Woburn 
Solo "01 How I'd Like to Make You Happy" 
Mary Jack Kinif 
Tap anil Jivr Dancing ..... Mara McDonald 
( lharacter Reading . . 

Taps 

Doll Charact 



Rita McGonigle 

Senna Sinters 

Impersonation in Song 

Mrs. Mollle Maguire 
• Ko^a Todd 



nice Connell, a well-known piano 
teacher of Stoneham, accompanied 
the musics! numbers. Mrs. Moilie 
Mapuire and Miss Coty contributed 
, vocal solo-i and Grand Repent Con- 
, Ion's reading, -The Three Boy 
Scouts" completed the entertainment. 

Refreshments were served in the 
form of fancy ices for the children, 
with coffee and caked for the adults, 
l-ecturer Katharine Rower, has re- 
ceived many com pliments tor this 
most successful social 

The next social c vent will be the 
old timers' social concert and dance 
en the evening of Dec. 17. The con- 
cert will comprise songs and read- 
ings of 25 years tgo, and an old- 
fashioned <k^ ten written and directed 
by (.rand Regent Frances T. Con- 
lon. 

Following th > concert there w ill be 
refreshments and dancing, modern 
anil old-time numbers. Prizes will be 
awarded for the best couple in the 
glide waltz. 



NEWST PARAGRAPHS 



Acrobatic Dance 

Finale of Popular Songs 

Dorothy and Klin..,- Rowen 

Miss Mabel M. Coty and Miss Ber- 



FROM MAYOR COLLIS 

The following letter from Mayor 
Harry Collis of Winchester, England, 
to the Star's Mr. Penaligan is repro- 
duced because it t xpresses so clearly 
the Mayor'.-, reaction to Ins recent 
visit bore. Ed. 



The Abbey House. Winchester, 

9th Novembi r 1930 
Dear Mr. Penaligan: 

Many thanks for your kind and 
coruiul letter, for the copies of the 
"Star" which are of course most in- 
teresting to us, and for the copy of 
your * ":> rt i >• .M which i- most amusing 
and which 1 shall keep always as a 
in. on ,, ,,i ii our visit to Winchester, 
Mas*. 

Wo were ever so pleased to have the 
opportunity of visiting Winchester 
and of making so many friends among 
your ehai ming townspeople, and I can 
heartily assure you that the Mayoress 
and 1 enjoyed our -lay with you every 
bit as much as you liked having us, 
and to us it will remain the most won- 
derful we k we have ever spent in 
our lives, for the warm reception we 
received at the hands of the Citizens 
of Winchester, Mass. can never be 
forgi Hon by us. We shall hope to 
have the pleasure of meeting many 
"f you again in oui own Winchester. 

With vi ry kindest r< gards. 

Yours most sincerely. 

Harry Collis. Mayor 



WINCHESTER C RANGE ELECTS 

The fi Mowing officers of Winches- 
ter Grunge, !V1!1, were elected at the 
annual meeting of the order, held 
Monday evi ning: 

Maati i II. inv llrovvn 

Owl ■.. . i Hvtlj Co i I |o 

Chaplain Vera lib kfoi a 

l.i l-.li, Lyons 

> t ward .1 u line • ail v 

\*si»tant Steward KuIhtI Whiting 

Ti ■ liaurei hlsic byolla 

. % Mcntai\ Marguerite Hnnlmi 

iUite l\ -I Dnvid M. ill. u 

( . i. - lib, in be Brown 

1','tnona Anne Krofifiuiat 

Kloi a (il. v.- Si, venMon 

Unl> iWiHtniit Steward Janet Rewar 

Kxccntive Committee f.o :i Yearn Win- 
•li,v, r Robinson 

Winchester Grange received an in- 
vitation to attend "Past Masters" 
night at Groton Grange, Nov. 25. 
Charles M. Gardner, high priest of 
Demeter to be the speaker. All mem- 
bers planning to tro get in touch with 
Heli n Brownell. 

L VDIES' FRIENDLY SOCIETY 

The l adies" Friendly Society met 
Tuesday, Nov. 18 at 'J::;" p, m . m the 
Unitarian Parish House, Mrs. Arthur 
(i. Robbins, presiding. Members of 
Alliances in towns about Wuichestei 
were special guests. Mrs. Frank S. 
Elliott, chairman of the General Al- 
liance, spoke on "Our Chinch and 
Social Service." Mrs. Juliet Tracy 
Shaw, soprano, sung a group of four 
songs, Mrs. (', H. Wat kins was her 
accompanist. Mrs. W. C Drisko gave 
a report on the October meeting at 
Leominster of the various New Eng- 
land Alliances. 

On Tuesday, Dec. !» at 1 p, m. the 
Executive Board will hold a meeting 
in the parish house Luncheon will 
be served by a special committee, 
Mrs. A. D. Rogers, chairman. The 
president, Mrs. Arthur ti. Robbins, 
hopes that all members of the Boar I 
may arrange to attend. 



NEWSY PAR WtRAPHS 



A Di dge sedan, driven by Pas- 
qunle Coltella of 63 Pearl street.! 
Everett, while going north on Wash- 
ington street at 1 o'clock Sunday ; 
morning was in collision with a IV- 
Soto sedan, driven by a man who cave 
bis name as T. G. Tracey of •'!•"> Glen- 
dale street. Worcester. The collision ' 
took place at the corner of Wash- 
ington street an 1 the Parkway. 

Ameede Garbino of 122 Sylvester 
avenue reporter) to the police at .":4H 
Sunday afternoon that while he was 
driving his Ford coupe along Main 
street the machine was bumped in 
the rear by a Reo truck which came 
out of l ake street and followed his 
ear down Main street. The Opemtor 
ff the Reo gave his name as Carl 
Packman of 124 Fletcher street. 

An extensive line of diaries, en- 
gagement books and calendar pads is 
at the Star Office. 



New Christmas cards, individual 
and box assortments, are now on dis- 
play at the Star Office. 



In these times of stress many 
business leaders, finding their 
operating capital or their family 
financial plans impaired, have 
turned to Life Insurance as a 
bulwark and with that assurance 
are eagerly pressing onward 
with renewed vigor.— Our new 
convertible contract provides 
protection at amazingly low cost 
in a first line company. 

KINGMAN P. CASS 
Insurance Broker 
945 Park Square Bldg.. Boston 



Many residents of Winchester find 
that banking in Boston with the At- 
lantic National is really very con- 
venient. Some prefer the office at 98 
Canal street because of its close prox- 
imity to the North Station. Others, 
especially the women, have chosen 
the Atlantic's new office at 144 Tre- 
mont street, because of its excep- 
tionally central location in the down- 
town shopping district. Both offices 
are modern in every respect and of- 
fer ail the facilities of one of the 
foremost banks in New England. The 
Atlantic National Rank of Boston 
will be glad to serve other Winches- 
ter people at whichever office is more 
convenient and cordially invites the 
use of its checking, savings and safe 
deposit facilities. Adv. 

A Whippet coach, driven by Domi- 



nico Luongo of 63 Swanton street. ' struck an iron street railway pole 
while going north on Main street and next to fire box 27. The front end 
in making the turn at Symmes cor- of the Whippet only was damaged 
ner last Sunday evening skidded and and no one was injured. 



YOUR PIANO 

The joy of ownership of your piano mean* a lot to you, the 
maintaining of a musical condition for best result* means attention, 
serviced regularly. Many a good piano has been ruined by neglect. 

To net all that the maker put into your piano means a -mall 
investment for big musical dividends. 

A yearly contract for two to four tunings can be made at a 
reast nable price. 

WILLIAM E. CILESKI 

EXPERT PIANO TUNER 
20 years' experience with Henry F. Miller and fflaann am. *:imlnt 
TEL. WOBURN 1223-.M 

n.'l-.'t* 



It's smart to be thrifty 




Your 
Best! 



There's at leas I one *uit or «lri's» 
in your wardrobe RIGHT Now 
that ii eed c !«■ nlriR « ml pr***- 
Iul:. Itolden Bell** moderate 
charge f«>r expert cleaning and 
superior pnn.tiim i« an invest- 
ment in good appea ranee. 



MEN'S SUITS . . $1 
WINTER COATS $1 

t fur trimmed extra) 

FUR COATS $3.50 up 
FELT HATS . . . 75c 



WORKS AT MALDEN 
Eastern Ave. 
at Main St. 

MALden 2000 



GOLDEN BELL 
Cleaners — Dyers 



You Take Pride In 

THE DELICIOUSNESS AND COMPLETENESS 



CF youR 



THANKSGIVING DINNER 

NO DINNER WILL EL QUITE COMPLETE WITHOUT 



CANDY 


SALTED NUTS 


THIN MINTS 


CRISPY FkESH 


CHOCOLATES 


DUCHESSE 


HARD CANDY 


SALTED NUTS 



ICES 

AND OF COURSE 

CALLAHAN'S ICE CREAM 

As Delicious as if you made it yourself from your own chen'shed recipe 
AND SO MUCH LESS TROUBLE! 



INDIVIDUAL ICES 
SULTANA ROLLS 
BOMBS 

BOMBS GLACE 
FROZEN PUDDING 

Telephone 

1506 
WOBURN 



VANILLA 
STRAWBERRY 
COFFEE 
PINEAPPLE 



JUST TELEPHONE NOW 

CALLAHAN'S 



CHOCOLATE 
MACAROON 
MAPLE WALNUT 
ORANGE ICE 
RASPBERRY ICE 

Telephone 

0862 
WINCHESTER 



It's thrifty to call Qolden Bell 



to #e 

• SURE 





Wm.t x.--i2K* lag 





...iihiiiui iiiiimillli ,..,|IIIIIIL 

S-m- MBS m. 




order your 
CHRYSANTHEMUMS 



Genuine Imported 

CANARIES 

ALL MALE CHOPPERS! GUARANTEED SINGERS! 

Their beauty, the wonderful sweetness and 
pleasant variety of their song are tradi- 
tional of th." true-bred and song-tratncd 
Choppers. Truly, these are aristocrats 
anions canaries! Bach canary is guaranteed 
to give you absolute delight in his golden- 
throated souk! 

*4.»5 — S| — $ < <);• — $4.95 — M '.».-. 

Buy ono of these gay songsters for someone's Christmas- — 'hi re is 
no carol that thrills the heart with such delight as the sour of a 
bird! These faithful feathered friends .sine all tin- merrier during 
the gray winter .lavs. $4.95 14.05— $4.05— $4.95— $4.96— $4.95. 

Beautiful Cage and 
Floor Stand 

To House Your Gay Golden Minstrel! 




Just an you s <• plcturril. Entlr> 
finished in Chrome Green 
chip or pi.i) with dainty toui 
heighten decorative effect, 



> cage and stand 
(that will not 
ihes of Black to 
Complete, with 




^•riiicr, flips, perches, and fine mesh guard — 
COMPLETE! 




rom 

Winchester Conservatories, inc. 

— Two Stores — 
Main Store and Greenhouses 
186 Cambridge Street Phones: Win. 1702, Win. 0603 

ARNOLD SHOP 

I Common Street Phone Win. 0205 




You Save Money 
By Paying Cash 
at Duncan's 



PLANT BULBS XOW! 

Tulips Hyacinths 

50c-dozen-. $ 1.00 

Wo sell only Guaranteed — Specially Selected — Hardy 
— Germ Free — flourishing Blooming Bulbs. Our own 
direct importation from Holland — 



Duncan^ 

for Hardwire 



£31 Main St., Melrose 
437 Franklin St., Melrose H. 
435 Broadway, Everett 
204 Pleasant St., Maiden 
369 Main St., Stoneham 
469 Main St., Wakefield 
5 Mt. Vernon St., Winchester 
437 Main St, Woburn 



Duncan Storm Op«i gvory Saturday Evening 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS.. STAR. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 21 1930 



Money to Loan and Vicinty 



AT 



On one and two-family houses preferred. Owner 
and occupant preferred. Applications now being 
taken for loans— not over $8000 to one borrower. 
Mori, y advanced to build. Call personally with 
Deed. 



6% 



MERCHANT'S Co operative Bank 

24 School Street, Boston, Mass. 



Assets over $30,000,000 



o24-Ut 




WORKMAN INJURED IN FALL Chester Hospital in the Kelley & 

Hawes ambulance by William H. Mc- 
Mullin, Patrolman James P. Donag- 
hey and Contractor James J. Fitzger- 
ald, the injured man's employer. At 
the hospital Carroll was attended by 
Dr. Rifhard W. Sheehy and was for 
a time held for observation. He was 
not found to be seriously injured and 
was later removed to his home. 



Anthony Carrol! of 116 Sylvester 
avenue was painfully injured short- 
ly before 9:45 Monday morning when 
he fell through the floor of the Kel- 
ley & Hawes Co. stable and dropped 
15 feet to the floor of the new garage 
which is in process of construction 
there. 



WINCHESTER HIGH HARRIERS 
MADE GREAT RECORD 

Won Six Out of Seven Meets Includ- 
ing Harvard interscholastics 



Carroll was rendered unconscious 
and was at first thought to be badly 
hurt. He was removed to the W in- 



Fancy paper napkins, lor bridges 
and luncheons, at the STAR office. 



CALB RADIATOR FURNITURE ¥ 




ALADDIN'S LAMP 

With « ruij of hi.- wondrous lamp. 
Aladdin could nave transformed your 
unsightly radiators Into beautiful 
piece* of furniture. Why not let us 
be > .»!i r Aladdin? We ran improve 
the decorative scheme of your home, 
prevent y»ur wall- ami draperies 
from becoming un'luly soiled, ami 
keep the Hir in your honv moist, 
healthful, and comfortable with < AI.K 
Metal Radiator Enclosures. Manu- 
factured locally in beautiful models 
ami finished to harmonize with your 
int. rior decorations. 
(AI.K METAL PRODUCTS CO. 
2511 Stuart St. Ronton, Mans. 

Hsnrork 06»3 



Weed Chains Denatured Alcohol 
Sleet Wands Mobiloil in Cans or Bulk 
Prestone Glycerine 

Deleo Batteries 

FOR SERVICE RECHARGING AND STORAGE 
ON ALL MAKES CALL 



26 Church Street, Winchester 



Tel. 1208 

n21-tf 



IWK^Stm/yerthaniTictwii 1 



Come in and ask for PROOF of every statement in this advertisement 

) ■ 





A. steel sKipwiQvoui 
a* snxgle rivet 



at a- gla.xice 




A "Kiss is Uie only 
sou,Tud tl\at has 
tlo echo - 




f -> Spam's 
most noted 
_ „ . Toreadors 
_ is 'an. Atwurioaxv 
ETOTja.BxooKlyn.NY 



WHEN IN NEED of a Plumber you want, clean satisfactory serv- 
ice. — That is the kind of service we give. We are as close to you 
as your telephone. 

P T. FOLEY 6c QO. 

PLUMBING- AND li EATI NO CONTRACTORS 

^/// #o66//?g pro/nptfi/ a/fc/rdreffo 

599 MAIN STREET WINCHESTER. MASS- 

SHOP— Tel. Win. 1492 RES.— Tel. Win. 1726 




PRESENTING 
THE NEW CHEVROLET SIX 




Totlay the Chevrolet Motor 
Company presents the Iligger 
flild Better Chevrolet Six, a 
new model of the six-cylinder ear which has 
enjoyed such wide popularity. In both the 
chassis and hotly, you will find expressed, as 
never before, Chevrolet's well-known policy 
of progress through constant improvement. 

The new Chevrolet is longer, lower and 
strikingly smart. The radiator has been 
dec|»ened and its appearance enhanced by a 
curving tie-bar and chrome-plated parabolic 
headlamps. The long hood sweeps back 
gracefully into the new body lines. Ami 



never was Fisher's fine craftsmanship more 
evident than in the bodies of the new Chev- 
rolet Siv! They are roomier, more cohifort- 
ahic. and throughout exhibit that attention 
to detail which is the basis of true quality. 

Mechanically, too. the new Chevrolet Six is 
better. The whcelhase is longer. The frame 
stronger. The steering easier. The clutch 
more durable. There is a smoother, quieter 
transmission. Wherever finer materials antl 
more advanced design could increase Chev- 
rolet quality antl economy — improvement 
has been made. The new Chevrolet Six is an 
outstanding achievement — it is the Great 
American Value! 



» » AT NEW LOW PRECES « 



Chevrolet has long been one of the lowest 
priced cars in the world. Yet tlue to the 
savings of volume production and increused 
manufacturing efficiency, tlie Digger and 



Better Chevrolet i* offered nt new low prices. 
Come in today. See and drive the new Chev- 
rolet S'u. Learn the econttmy of owning a 
modern, nnequailty, six-cylinder automobile. 



The 

Phaeton 

The 

Roadster 

Sport Roadster 
with rumble seat 



510 

475 
495 



The 

Coach 

Standard 

Coupe 

Standard Five- 
Window Coupe . . 



545 
535 
545 



575 



Sport Coupe 
with rumble seat 

Standard 'ftQR 
Sedan MUU 

650 



Special 
Sedan . 



A 



S P E C I A L E Q V IPM ENT EXTRA 
Chevrolet Trucks from $3."> to $695 
All prices f. o. b. Flint, Michigan 



k six 



i in vieoi i i 



f 
i 



IT'S WISE TO CHOOSE A SIX 

FRANK MURPHY, Incorporated 

748 Main Street Tel. Win. 0298 



For the first time in the history of 
the school Winchester High won an 
interscholastic cross country title Oct. 
•"il when the Red and Black won the 1 
t lass B school-boy championship at j 
the Harvard games on Soldiers' Field. 
The triumph came as a fitting climax 
to a most successful season which 
saw the locals lose but one meet in 
seven starts. 

The Arlington High harriers, with | 
years of background in the hill and 
dale game, succeeded in defeating 
Winchester iii its second meet of tin- 
fall. The score was close, and it is 
l>y no means certain that Arlington 
could have repeated in a second meet- j 
in later in the season. 

Winchester ndded cross country to 
its list of sports three years ago with : 
the arrival in Winchester of Meldon ; 
Wenner, a Springfield graduate, who! 
has carried the coaching responsibility 
of the squad. 

Coach Wenner has done a really fine 
job with a faithful, hard working I 
group of boys, winning a big majority I 
of the meets in which his teams have I 
engaged, and developing in "Bob' 1 
Winchester a runner good enough to ', 
go through a season undefeated in | 
competition with the best schoolboy 
runners in this district. 

"Bob" finished first in each of the i 
locals' seven meets this fall, and run- ' 
ning fin the Arlington meet, not only j 
finished in front of the Arlington star, I 
O'Neil, but covered the 2Va-mile Mid- ! 
dlesex Fells course in the record 
breaking time of 13 min. 14 sec., clip- 
ping IT seconds off the previous mark. 

In the Harvard interscholastics 
Winchester was clocked in 13 min. 59 
sec, but he was chock full of running, 
and finished about .">(> yards in front 
of Lawrence of Concord and Gilbert 
of Somerville. He could have been 
seconds faster in a close race. 

Capt. George McCormack, William 
Staulker, Kenneth West, Salvatore 
Corby, Edward Bowler, Richard Pet- 
tingell and Kenneth Campbell are the 
boys who as team mates of Winches- 
ter have provided the balance to make 
victory in six of seven meets possible. 
All have run well and all have shown 
consistent improvement under Coach 
Wenner. Cross country is not a spec- 
tacular sport and competitors do not 
have the advantage of big crowds and 
enthusiastic cheering sections to spur 
them on. Bach boy is pretty much 
on his own, ami must do a whole lot 
of consistent plugging during the sea- 
son to show to advantage in the races. 
Properly supervised there is nothing 
better as an all around developer than 
cross country, and Winchester's suc- 
cess in recent seasons is most gratify- 
ing. 

The past three years have marked 
a resumption of the sport in high 
school, and not as many suppose, the 
introduction of cross country running 
to Winchester. The high school spon- 
sored a team in 1913, and in that sea- 
son competed in a Mystic Valley Cross 
Country Meet, held here, with Arling- 
ton, Woburn, Stoneham, Wakefield, 
Melrose and other schools in this dis- 
trict. For two or three years after 
1913 Winchester had a team, but in- 
terest in the sport waned and cross j 
country went into the discard alone; j 
with track. Wray Rohrman, "Hick" I 
Favor, "Phil" Waite, "Doug" Case and 
"Johnnie" Caldwell were among those : 
prominent in the sport in the old days. 
It is of interest to note that Arling- 
ton's "Hoc" McCarthy was handling I 
cross country at that time and is still ! 
coaching the Red and Gray after 17 j 
years. 

Probably none of the old Winches- 
ter teams could compare with those \ 
of the past two seasons at high school. I 
The old timers were pretty much on 
their own when it came to training j 
and had little or no coaching. Coach | 
Wenner has changed all this and has ( 
handled his boys splendidly, both from I 
the standpoint of training and coach- | 
ing. He deserves much credit for the : 
team's fine showing, and the boys 
themselves have followed his instruc- 
tions to the letter. Winthrop An- 
drews has served as manager of the 
team. 

The season's record follows: 

Winchester 1!> Stoneham S* 

Winchester 31 Arlington 21 

Winchester J7 Beverly 2» 

Winchester 2~> Concord 88 

Winchester 17 Weymouth 50 

Winchester 2h -Braintree 20 

Winchester 62— Interscholastics ...s« 




FORTNIGHTLY NOTES 



To those who heard Dr. Albert H. 
Gage, either at the Youth conference 
ol the Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion or at the Wadleigh Parent- 
Teacher Association meeting, or who 
have heard their friends speak of bun 
only the brief notice that he will ad- 
dress the members of the Fortnightly 
at the next meeting on Monday, Nov". 
21 at 2t3u p. m. m the Town Hall will 
be necessary to ensure their atten- 
dance. Dr. Gage will explain "The 
New Fashioned Heme," a topic which 
should be of absorbing interest to all 
numbers of the club. At the close 
of this lecture, a pleasant social hour 
will follow while tea is being served 
by the social committee, Mrs. Estelle 
R. Little, chairman. 

Mrs. Dmis K. Hills, chairman of 
the Community Service Committee, 
has a list of several families among 
which many of the mothers are try- 
ing to find work by the day for the 
support of their families. Men are 
anxious to earn money by doing any 
kind of work around the house or 
yard. If club members having such 
work to be done would Ret in touch 
with Mrs. Hills, the service rendered 
to the individual, the club, and the 
community would be most valuable. 
Among these same names are many 
that need clothing as well us work. 
Bring to the next meeting of the 
Fortnightly on Monday any clothing 
you may have available for children 
from 2 to 14 years of age. men or 
women. If you have no clothing to 
bring, remember that any canned 
food brought to this committee will 
bring relief to those who are in need. 

On Thursday afternoon, Dec. I the 
Co-operation with War Veterans' 
Committee will bold open house at 
Fortnightly Hall from 3 p. m. to ."• 
p. m. to which every member of the 
Fortnightly is not only cordially in- 
vited but even urged to come, there 
will be a delightful entertainment 
and there will be the opportunity to 
leave in the hands of Mrs. Valerie T. 
O'Connor and her committee those 
little gifts with which we all like to 
remember the disabled service men 
at Christmas. In case then' should 
be any who are at a loss as to the 
kind of gifts which are very welcome, 
the following list may serve as guide: 
checkerboards, playing cards, pinochle 
cards, books of stamps, pencils and 
pens, socks size 11 or 11%, ties, bed- 
side bags of cretonne, shaving sets, 
small standing mirrors, picture 
frames, men's toilet articles, toilet 
water, tooth paste, sweaters, garters, 
shirts size 11'-. to 1(1. cuff links, col- 
lar buttons, cigarettes, tobacco. The 
notice is presented this early that 
you may be forewarned. 

In spite of the persistent drizzle, 
a gay and numerous group played 
bridge in Fortnightly Hall on Tues- 
day afternoon, Nov. 18. All were re- 
minded of the club's jubilee year by 
the clever decorations of golden bells 
on yellow and white covers ami the 
gold ribbon which ti<rd the pencils. 
At the close of the playing, a most 
delicious and satisfying tea was 
served. The very dainty luster tea 
sets which were enjoyed for the first 
time were the gift of the Dramatics 
Committee of last year, of which 
Mrs. Rlizabth S. Hall was chairman. 
The (rift is and will be appreciated by 
the (dub members. The success of the 
afternoon's party was assured by the 
work of Mrs. Mary Cass and her 
committee. 



MR. PRIEST WILL WELCOME 
YOUR DOLLARS 



PAINFULLY INJURED AS AUTO- 
MOBILES COLLIDE 



Miss Katherine M. Foley of 778 
Main street, clerk in the Assessors' 
office, and Mrs. Mary Dooley of 40 
Middlesex street were injured short- 
ly after 12 o'clock Monday when the 
automobiles in which they were rid- 
ing were in collision at the junction I 
of Water and Rumford streets. 

According to the police Miss Foley [ 
was driving a Ford coupe north on 
Rumford street and Mrs. Dooley was I 
riding in a Ford sedan, driven by I 
James H. Dooley of 40 Middlesex i 
street, the latter heading west on ' 
Water street. The coupe was jammed | 
between the sedan and a pole, and 
was badly smashed. The sedan was 
also damaged. 

Miss Foley was removed from the 
machine and taken to her home when' 
she was treated by Dr. Richard W. 
Sheehy for two broken ribs and cuts 
about the legs. Mrs. Dooley was al- 
so taken to her hi me and treated for 
back and leg injuries by Dr. Milton 
J. Quinn. 



WINCHESTER BOAT ( LCI! 



Tonight at the Calumet Club we 
are holding the first of a series of 
joint dances with the Calumet Club. 
Whether or not these are to be con- 
tinued will be determined by the 
turn-out at this initial party. It is 
hoped that members of both clubs 
and any friends will take advantage 
of these dances. We promise you a 
good time at moderate cost. 



Even if the Winchester Chapter of 
the American Red Cross has a perfect 
soliciting organization, it couldn't 
possibly reach all the people in Win- 
chester who ought to be numbers and 
who undoubtedly are not only willing 
but eager to contribute their dollar 
in this great annual Roll Call cam- 
paign. 

If no one calls upon you at your 
home, won't you please send your 
dollar, together with a dollar for each 
member of your family, to Mr. Wil- 
liam Priest, Winchester Savings 
Bank. 

During the coming year, the Red 
Cross may render you no personal 
service. A company that carries in- 
surance on your house renders you 
no annual service; yet you pay your 
premiums gratefully and hope that 
the insurance company never will be 
called upon to pay back your money- 
It's the protection you desire. 

The same is true of the Red Cross. 
This, too, is a great protective organ- 
ization. Those who are fortunate 
enough not to require its aid should 
express their gratitude by contribut- 
ing a few dollars now and then so that 
it mav continue its glorious work of 
helping the hungry, the sick, and the 
cold. 

Right now, in Winchester, there are 
dozens of families where the children 
are hungry. There are people who 
have to wrap themselves up in old 
rags in an effort to protect themselves 
against the cold. 

The Winchester Red Cross, with- 
out indulging in unnecessary pub- 
licity, has quietly and effectively 
helped many of those in need. 

Undoubtedly, in spite of all that 
thl optimists tell us, the demands 
upon the treasury of the local lied 
Cross will be greater this winter than 
ever. 

Your dollar, therefore, is needed 
more than it ever was needed before. 

So won't you please send your 
check today to Mr. William Priest at 
the Winchester Savings Bank? 



Miss Muriel Carr, former high 
school field hockey star, played at 
right wing for Radcliffe last Saturday 
when the Cambridge team defeated 
Wheatcn College. 



A Pontiac coach, driven by Rose 
M. Mahoney of X Spring street, Wo- 
burn, while going south on Wildwood 
street last Saturday afternoon and 
in making a right turn into Fletcher 
street struck a hydrant at the corner 
of the latter roadway. The front end 
of the Pontiac was badly damaged, 
but the hydrant was apparently all 
right. No injuries were reported. 



8 



THE WINCHE STER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1930 



WINCHESTER NOSED OUT 
MAYNARD 



I-ocal Team Slowed Up by Injuries to 
Emery, Smith and Procopio 



dn»n» — W. Smith, Knowlton. O'Leary 2. 
Point after touchdown*— Smith. Referee— 
O'Halloran. Umpire — MarDonald. Linesman 
LaKarme. Time— four ten minute period*. 



4-H WINNERS 



DELIVERED INTERESTING LEC- 
TURE ON CAPE COD 



Winchester High School nosed out 
Maynard High at football, 13 to 12, in 
an interesting game at Maynard last 
Saturday afternoon. The locals' early 
game offensive drive stalled badly af- 
ter Captain "Don" Emery, "Kingfish" 
Smith and "Hokie" Procopio were 
forced out of play with injuries in a 
short space of time. The loss of 
Emery seemed to hurt the local cause 
the most for the Winchester leader is 
a great defensive player. Coach 
Mansfield's boys looked great during 
the first half of the game, scoring 
once in each quarter and narrowly 
missing a third score. 

After half time Maynard came back 
full of fight while Winchester, with- 
out its sparkplug, Emery, didn't go so 
well. Maynard need not have scored 
its second touchdown, had the locals 
played smart football, while hard 
tackling would have prevented the 
first score. 

Procopio kicked off to start the 
game and Maynard returned the ball 
to its 28-yard line. Two line bucks 
made H yards and on a fake kick May- 
nard hit the local right tackle to take 
the- hall to Winchester's 45-yard 
marker, 

lleii' the locals braced and took 
the ball on downs. On a series of 
running plays off the Maynard tackles 
Knowlton, Smith and Lundblad took 
the ball to 2 yard line where Smith 
plunged over. Wilmer also rushed 
for the extra point after touchdown 
which finally meant the ball game 

Procopio kicked off and Maynard 
rushed to first downs on its 45-yard 
line. Here Winchester hold sharply 
and Maynard was forced to punt. Em- 
ery was through very fast, to block the 
kick, and several Winchester players 
and one Maynard hoy scrambled about j 
for the leather. Instead of taking out j 
the sole Maynard representative, and j 
permitting a team mate to pick up the 
ball and run for a touchdown, the lo- 
cal player dove for the pigskin which 
he recovered on the 19-yard line as 
the quarter ended. 

Winchester fumbled and Maynard 
recovered, this time punting to the lo- 
cals' 36-yard line. Robinson ran hack 
the punt to the Maynard 45-yard 
marker and Winchester crashed off 
tackle for a first down. On the last 
play of the sequence Emery sustained 
a badly broken nose and had to be 
taken from the game, Ambrose going 
in to play his center berth. The same 
running 'offense off the tackles made 
another first down and then Smith 
dropped back to shoot off a pass to 
Robinson who was tackled on the 1- 
yard line. As he threw the pass 
Smith was tackled and hit the ground 
hard, rebreaking his nose which was 
first broken in the Melrose game. Le- 
Roy took over his halfback duties, and 
Hal Knowlton hit inside tackle for the 
score behind "Dan" Smith. Procopio 
hurt his leg in the scrimmage and 
"Ruck" Daley was rushed into the 
fray. LeRoy tried a drop kick for the 
extra point, but was slow in getting 
his offering away, and Maynard 
blocked the try. 

The ball was in Maynard s terri- 
tory until half time, but following in- 
termission the home team scored 
quickly. Winchester received and Le- 
Roy ran the kickoff to Winchester's 
28-yard line. A pass from Lundblad 
was intercepted, and Maynard pulled 
off a pretty lateral forward which re- 
sulted in a touchdown. 

Robinson narrowly missed intercept- 
ing the ball with a clear field for a 
score, but the ball slid through his 
fingers into the arms of O'Leary who 
was hit by Lundblad but wasn't 
stopped, and ran HO yards for the 
touchdown. The locals stormed 
through to block the try for goal. 

Winchester received and "Dan 
Smith ran 15 yards from his 20 to the 
35-yard line. The locals slashed along 
off the tackles to the Maynard 28-yard 
line where the defense stiffened and 
Lundblad kicked outside at the 5-yard 
mark. 

Maynard rushed to one first down 
and then Maynard tried a long pass 
which was incomplete. The officials 
ruled interference on Robinson when 
the Mavnard receiver fell down while 
"Robbie" was chasing him and the 
pass was called complete for a gain of 
22 yards. Winchester held and May- 
nard kicked to Winchester's 40-yard 
line. . 

A single first down ended the period 
and as the final quarter opened the lo- 
cals rushed to Maynard's fi-yard line 
where Knowlton passed to Tofuri for 
the touchdown. Winchester was ruled 
offside and Mavnard recovered a fum- 
ble, then completing a 30-yard pass on 
the 42-yard line. 

Here Tofuri intercepted a pass but 
Winchester was called for unnecessary 
roughness and the penalty gave May- 
nard a first down on Winchester's 44- 
yard line. A couple of long end runs 
and some effective line bucking took 
the ball to Winchester's 8-yard line 
where the locals held for downs. On 
the first plav a double pass was fum- 
bled behind the line and recovered by 
Maynard on Winchester's 4-yard line. 
The first rush was stopped but on the 
second O'l^eary plunged over at right 
tackle. Maynard tried to rush for the 
extra point but Lundblad ran the car- 
rier out of bounds. 

Winchester received and Ambrose 
ran 22 yards to his 42-yard line as the 
game ended. The game was very- 
cleanly played despite the injuries and 
was featured by some fine work by 
Robinson. Knowlton and Wilmer 
Smith for Winchester; 

The summary: 

WINCHESTER MAYNARD 

DeMinico, le re. Gutteriefe 

re. Swartx 

Colpa*. It rt. Sweeney 

rt. Mullin 

Flaherty. I* rg\ Saarl 

Emery, c c Staratt 

Ambrose, e e. Henkala 

Procopio. r« lit, Wilson 

Paley. rs; In. Bucarsi 

D. Smith, rt It. S. Hintsa 

DiApella, re le, Fria-ard 

Hitchhorn, re le, Saarela 

Tofuri. Qb qb, Arcisi 

Robinson, qb 
Hickey, qb 

W. Smith, lhb rhb, O'l-eair 

Tarquine. lhb rhb, Thompson 

Knowlton, rhb lhb. Warila 

LeRoy. rhb lhb. Sokolowaki 

Lundblad. fb fb. O. Hintsa 

Score - Winchester IS, Maynard 12. Touch- , 



Members of the Winchester 4-H 
Canning Club have recently com- 
pleted work for the season. The fol- 
lowing, who have finished all require- 
ments including the submitting of 
records on their work, have been 
awarded pins: 

Certificate — - Elizabeth Edmunds 

Gold Pin - Josephine Scaturo, Christine Rus- 

ao. 

Silver Pin -Richard Elliott. Catherine Pao- 
vinzano, Cnmille Delairrass, Rose Russo. Nor- 
ma Beaton, Hetty Giacolone. 

Bronze Pin Jennie Marabella, Elizabeth 
Marabella. Antoinette Rania, Catherine Gal- 
lelo. Natalie Bilyra, Frances O'Brien, Mary 
Malloy, Marjorie Stevenson, Annie Colucci, 
Viola Luontco. Julia Luoniro, Recatta Pento, 
Virginia Buzzota, Elizabeth Mistutti. 

Pins are in the form of the 4-H 
symbol, a four-leaf clover. Bronze 
is awarded for completion of first 
year work, silver for second, gold for 
third. There is a certificate for fourth 
year and a gold seal for every addi- 
tional year, with an attractive enamel 
pin — the so-called "national pin" — 
for sixth year of work. To receive a 
bronze pin, club members must can 
at least 24 jars of fruits and vege- 
tables, at least two kinds of fruit and 
three kinds of vegetables including 
greens or tomatoes. Quantity to be 
canned is increased gradually from 
year to year for more advanced club 
members. Second year girls learn to 
make jam and jelly and third year 
year members put up pickles, soup, 
and some fruit product other than 
jam or jelly, as well as can fruits and 
vegetables. Girls doing fourth year, 
or more advanced work, plan ways to 
use their products in menus, work 
out canning budgets for their fami- 
lies, etc. 



At the close of the regular meeting 
of William Parkman Lodge of Ma- 
sons, held Tuesday evening, Nov. 11, 
an enthusiastic audience listened to a 
most interesting lecture on "Cape 
Cod, It's Past, Present and Future," 
by Edwin A. Freeman of Belmont who 
was the guest of the lodge. 

Mr. Freeman was introduced by the 
Master of Willfam Parkman, Wor. 
John Hart Taylor, and held the at- 
tention of his listeners through an 
address of some length. The address 
was profusely illustrated with both 
still and motion pictures, many of 
which were intensely interesting. 

He showed scenes from the old days 
on the Cape when ship building was a 
major industry at Welfleet, along the 
North River "and at Pembroke; and 
spoke interestingly of this era in the 
Cape's development. He then sketched 
the Cape as it is today, a playground 
for summer people, and prophesied 
that its future development will be 
more and more along the lines of a 
vacation pleasure resort. A collation 
was served. 



Spencer Corsets, home Appoint- 
ments. Jean MacLellan. Tel. Win. 
I 0406-R. ap27-tf 



Thomas Quigley, Jr. 

eamster, Contractor an* Stone Mason 



PAVING, FLOORING, ROOF SG 
In Artificial Stone. Asphalt 
and All Concrete Products 
sulrwalka. Driveways. Carbine, Steal, Etc. 

Floors for Cellar*. Stables, Factories 
and Warehouses 
Estimates Furnished 

18 LAKE STREET 



TUBERCULOSIS CHRISTMAS 
SEAL SALE 

As Nov. 27 draws near, the date 
for the sale of the Tuberculosis 
Christmas Seals, the Winchester com- 
mittee feels it is a tittinir time to 
thank all our townspeople who so 
generously supported the work last 
year. 

Owing to this help we were able to 
send 13 children to our Health Camp 
at Sharon and to supply food anil 
clothing when necessary during the 
winter. All our children gained in 
weight. The largest gain for one 
child being 12 pounds, the smallest 
five pounds, the total gain 128 pounds. 

Beside the daily healthful games, 
sewing, etc., rug making, basket 
weaving and other handicraft work 
was taught the children. 

Please buy your Christmas Seals 
in Winchester as it is only from the 
sales in our own home town that we 
obtain the money toward the amount 
needed for the Tuberculosis work. 

Winchester Tuberculosis 
Committee 



Good's 
School 



Harry Good, Prop. 

Well Broken Horses 

and Ponies 
Personal Supervision 
MAIN STREET MEDFORD 

(Near Oak Grove Cemetery I 

Tel. Mystic 3802 



Mrs. Robert V. Davis spent last , 
week-end in Albany where she went to 
meet her niece, Winifred Bentley, who 
is to spend the winter with the Davis I 
family. 



Evening EXCURSION Fares 

3B O ST ON 

ROUND 32c TRIP 

Tickets goad weekday evenings only, on 
trains from Winchester arriving at 
Boston 6 I'. M. or later; returning- 
leaving- Boston the same evening not 
later than midnight. 

EVENING EXCURSION TICKETS 
also on aale to Boston and return from 

Wobum 40c 

BUY TICKETS BEFORE BOARDING 
TRAINS 
Tickets on sale in advance 



BOSTON AND MAINE 



R. R. 

n!4-3t 



SERVING 

YOUR COMMUNITY 




THERE is an Edison Shop conveniently located in 
your community. At this local shop you may 
transact your business with the Company, such aa 
paying your monthly service bill, or exchanging 
burned out lamps and fuses without charge. 

The Edison Shop also carries a complete line of 
reliable electrical appliances, and any of these will 
be fully demonstrated to you before purchasing. 
The Shop is managed by our representatives and 
they are always willing and ready to attend to your 
electrical needs. 



In WINCHESTER the District Manager is Mr. F. E. 
RANDALL. Winchester Edison Shop is located at 
516 Main Street and the telephone number is 
Winchester 1260 



■EDISON 

€L€CTRIC ILLUMINATING 
COMPANY 0£ -BOSTON 



E. W. NICHOLSON 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 

We're equipped to handle any 
kind of a plumbing job, big ir 
small, the public has to offer. 
We do our work well and we do 
it in jig time, too. No waiting 
around for inspiration. We will 
do your repair work in a hurry 
and you'll be perfectly willing 
to meet the sort of a bill we'll 
hand you. 

118 WINN STREET. WOBURN 
Tel. Woburn 0899 



Give your mother 1 , 
friend or sweet- 
heart a guaran- 
teed, sweet sing- 
ing canary bird. 
We have Harts 
Mountain singers. 
$7.00, genuine se- 
lected St. Andreas- 
burg with long silvery trills and Brand 
variations, day and nurht songsters. $9.0o. 
Also cages of all descriptions, cat. dog and 
bird supplies, etc. 




CHAS. LUDLAM 

(9 Bromfield St. and 20 Bosworth St. 
Tel. Utterly »3«» Boston 

Established 1878 

ol0-13t 



C OK E 

$12.00 PER TON 
Stove, Nut and Egg siies. 
Extra charge for smaller 
quantities. All orders cash. 

FRIZZELL BROS. 

Tel. Woburn 0570 
6 Greenwood Avenue 




Our Modern, Completely Equipped Funeral Home and Chapel 

KELLEY & HAWES CO. 
JFuneral Directors Lady Assistants 

Service Available Anywhere in New England PHONES: WINCHESTER 0035. 0174. 0106 




Social Telephone 
Calls at a SMALL COST 



J^USINESS men make out-of-town calls as a matter of course. 
JD It saves time and money. Many women, however, hesitate 
to make social calls to distant poin s because they think such calls 
are terribly expensive. 

When they ask about rates for calls to daughters, sisters or 
other relatives, they usually are pleasantly surprised at the 
answer, especially evening and night rates. 

The day rate periol on out-of-town calls by rumber is from 4:30 
A.M. to 7 P. M.; the evening rae peri d, (rum 7 P. M. to 
8:30 P. M.; the night rate period, from 8:30 P. M. to 4:30 A. M. 

The day rate for a 3 minute station-to-station call (by 
number) to Baltimore-, for example, is $1.65. The evening 
rate is $1 40; and the night rate is only 95 cents. In other 
words, the evening rate on such a call is about 25 per cent 
less than the day rate, and the night rate is about 50 
per cent less. 

Much can be said in 3 mnutes, but greater than the number of 
words is the satisfaction of hearing a loved one's voice. 

We would like to have our women clients do this: call up 
and give us the names of distant friends. We will list 
them in an attractive personal directory, put down their 
telephone numbers and also the day, evening and night 
rates for a 3-minute call, and then mail this little directory 
back to you without charge. 

Then, when you wish to call, just give the number wanted to your 
local operator and hold the receiver at your ear — exactly as you 
would make a local call— and presto ! you'll be connected almost 
as quickly. 



Mrs. Jessie C. McLeod 

Vmchaur 



Miss Edna V. Babcock 

Wmch-uer Service Rtpmenuw*, 

for Num/KTJ IIOOIOJJJO 

Winchester Business Office : 17 Thompxm Street 



WsicheJUT Service RefterseiuUM 
r Numbers ot 



I OOOI to I 'OQ 



New England Telephone and Telegraph Company 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1930 



9 



John J. Murphy, Dealer in Junk of 
All Kinds. Highest price* pa.d. If 
you have anything in this line, tele- 
phone either Winchester 0924, 0824-W 
or drop a postal to 2M Churcfc street. 

mhlt-t/ 



Back Gammon sets at the STAR 
office. 



Tj^f A Cambridge Institution 



University 
- Theatre 

Harvard Square. Combridfe. Mass. 

Now Showing 
Nnrmi Talmadge in 
"DV HARRY. WOMAN OK 
PASSION" 
Dorothy Mackaill in 
"HHIfiHT LIGHTS" 
Sun. Mon. T'i>-* Wed, 
Nov. 24. 25, 2»i 

"A Lady Surrender" 

CONRAD NAGEL and 
KOSE HOKAKT 
Elsie Ferguson in 
• S( AHLET PAGES" 

Thurs. Fri. Sat. 
Nov. 27, 2s 21, 

"MONTE CARLO" 

JACK BUCHANAN and 
J EA N ETTE MarllONAI.il 

"THE SEA GOD" 
Rirhard Arlen. Kay Wraj 

Continuous t ti 



WINCH En I fcK NATIONAL BANK 

In compliance with the requirements of 
Chapter, 5!*0. Section 40. Acta of 1HUS, as 
amended by (.'haiiter 491, Section 6, Acta of 
1809, and by Chapter 171. Section I, Acta of 
1'JlJ. notice i« hereby given of the lose of 
pant-book No. 13*0. 

EDWIN M. NELSON. Cashier 

n,-3t 



Calendar pads at the Star Office. 



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the sub- 
scribers halve been duly appointed executors of 
the will of Aiir.. Helen Pratt late of Winches- 
ter m the County of Middlesex, Max*, deceased, 
testate, and have taken upon themselves that 
trust by Iring bond, as the law directs. 

All persona having demands upon the es- 
tate of said deceased are hereby required to 
exhibit the aamr; and all person* indebted to 
-ii id .state an' called upon U> make payment 

ELMER Li. FLETCHER 
CHAS. H. PKATT 

Executors 

2n George St., Somerville, Mass. 
t» l.aitranKe St., Winchester Mans. 
November *. 1930 nl4-3t 



BOWDOIN CONTINUOUS 



WUK Of NOV *-SU*-*WN-TU£S-WlO-2l»«1S*imj 

AAILTON SILLS in "The SEA W0CF* i 
FIR DORSW in'TMOSI fjjjjjj FRENCH GIRLT, 
§ R-K-O VAUOEVILIC ACTS In Pcraon t 
BEGINNING NEXT THURS.~ CN7IRI NCW SHOW' 
ftatuiinq 'Ml ft MAN' with Hill N TWl I ft TRE £$-\ 

t»H(S 61 EASOK also 11/6*1 IWrnM HHIItMUMUk 
fKAHK fUr -NQAH BflfiV^ED&U HUGtW ' 



STONE HA IVI 



Mat. 2:1. 



Sat. 6:15, K :.'!<) 



Sun. ,? I'. M. 



Dorothy MacKail and' Milton Sills 1 in "MAN TROUBLE" 
Fannie Brice and Robert Armstrong in "BE YOURSELF" 

AUDIO REVIEW Linenware Friday 



Benny Rubin in "HOT CURVES" 
Kenneth McKenna in "TEMPLE TOWER" 

Starting Kin-Tin Tin in a Talking Serial— Matinee < > n I > FABLES 

Sunday and Mondayj Nov. 24 
Greta Garbo in "ROMANCE" 
Jack Oakie and Mary Brian in "SOCIAL LION" 

Beautyware Monda> SOI N I) NEWS 

Tuesday, Nov. !■> 

High School Nite for Our Successful Football Plavers 

COMEDi KM I K ROCKNE FOOTBALL SERIES 

Wednesday, Nov. 2>'> 
We Will Give Away .'I Turkeys and Groceries on 

COUNTRY STORE NIGHT 

Chance to Get Your Thanksgiving Dinner 



Thursday and Friday, Nov. 27, 2S 
Clara Bow and Stanley Smith in 
"LOVE AMONG MILLIONAIRES" 
Belle Bennett, Marion Nixon and Rex Bell in "COURAGE" 

AUDIO REVIEW Thursday, 3 Shows— 2:15, 6:15, 8:30 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX. SS. 

i L. S.I 

WHEREAS, at a meeting of the County 
Commissioners for said County, at Lowell on 
the first Tuesday of September A. D. 19S0. 

ON THE PETITION of the Selectmen of 
Winchester, praying for the relocation of Hdfh 
Street, beginning at a tn.int nearly opposite 
its junction with Arlington Street, thence 
westerly for a distance of about 1000 feet ; 
also for the relocation of Main Street from 
its junction with Highland Avenue north- 
westerly of the Medford line : thence north- 
westerly past its junction with Bacon and 
Grove Streets to its junction with Madison 
Avenue, it was adjudged that said relocation 
of -Main Street is of common convenience 
and necessity: 

Said Commissioners therefore give notice 
that they will meet at Commissioners' Office, 
Court House, in Cambridge on the twelfth da> 
of December A. D. 1»30. at ten o'clock in the 
forenoon, to relocate accordingly, 

CHARLES T. HUGHES. 

AMt. Clerk 

November 7. 1930 
A true copy, 

Attest: Henry L. Walker, Deputy Sheriff 

nH-.'tt 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. Office of the 
Supervising Architect. Washington. D. C. No- 
vember 13, 1930. Sealed bids will be opened 
in this office, room 4S9, at 2 p. m., December 
4. 1980, for painting- plaster in the U. S. 
post office at Wincne*ter, Mass. Specification* 
may be obtained from the custi*iian of the 
building, or at this office in the dis- 
cretion of the supervising architect. Jas. A. 
Wetmore. Acting Supervising Architect. 



A resident of Cross street noti- 
fied the police last Saturday that a 
man was lying in the road in front 
of her home. Patrolmen James P. 
Donaghey and Janus E. Farrell re- 
sponded "and found a Wobum man 
who had been striken ill. He was 
taken to his home in the police far. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX. SS, PROBATE COURT 

To the heirs-at-law. next of kin and all 
other persons interested in the estate of 
Charles I.. Mitchell late of Winchester in said 

County, deceased, 

WHEREAS, a certain instrument purport- 
ing to be the last will and testament of said 
deceased has been presented to said Court, 
for probate, by The Boston Safe Deposit and 
Trust Company and Chauncey 1.. Mitchell 
who (ray that letters testamentary may lie 
issued to them, the executors therein named, 
without giving a surety on their official b»>nd. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a Pro- 
bate Court to la- held at Cambridge in s.-ml 
County of Middlesex, on the first day of De- 
cember A. I). 1930, at ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon, to show cause, if any you have, why 
the same should not be granted. 

And said petitioners are hereby directed to 
civ,, public notice thereof, by publishing this 
citation once in each week, for three succes- 
sive weeks, in The Winchester Star a news- 
paper published in Winchester the last pub- 
lication to be one day, at least, before said 
Court, and by mailing, post-paid, or deliver- 
ing a copy of tins citation to all known per- 
son* interested in the estate, seven days at 
least before .-aid Court. 

Witness. JOHN C. LEGGAT, Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, this thirteenth day of 
November in the year one thousand nine hun- 
dred and thirty. 

LORING r. JORDAN. Ibvister 

nl4-3t 



MEDFORD THEATER 



Mat. 2 00 



Eve. 7:00 



( all Mystic 1S00 For Reserve Seats 



WEEK or NOV. 23 



Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 

"Sea God" 

with RICHARD ARLEN and FAY WRAY 

One nt' tlio must amazing stories ever filmed 

"Wide Open" 

Based on the Novel of Narrow Street 

with EDWARD EVERETT NORTON 

Tricky situation that creates laughing laughter 
LAUREL AMI HARDY'S "MURDER CASK" — Comedy Riot 



Thursday. Friday. Saturday 

"Good News 



J9 



with BESSIE LOVE. MARY LAWLOR and STANLEY SMITH 

Greatest of college life pictures 

JACK HOLT and DAVY LEE in 

"Squealer" 

A picture you must see to believe 
Now Playing 

"LOVE IN THE ROUGH" and "SILENT ENEMY" 



CAPITOL 

ARLINGTON 
Massachusetts Avenue nt Lake Street 



Now Playing 

Ituth ( haltertnn in 

'ANYBODY'S WOMAN" 
and 

Sally Starr in 
"PARDON MY GUN" 



Ti 



Wed.. N< 



14, 



"ALL QUIET ON THE 
WESTERN FRONT" 

3 Yitaphone Art* and Paramount 
Sound News 



Thurs. Fri, Sat, Nov. 2", 28, 2'.i 

Continuous Performance Thanksiriving 
Day 

NANCY CARROLL and 
111 DDY ROGERS in 

"FOLLOW THRU" 

Kin Tin Tin in 
"ROUGH WATERS" 



K M. LOEW'S 



Regent 

ARLINGTON 

7 MEDFORD ST. TEL. 11*7 

Matinees at 2— Evenings at 7:30 
Saturdays and Holidays Continuoua 
I :30 to 10:30 



Friday and Saturday. Nov. 21. 22 

LOIS MOHAN in 

"Not Damaged" 
BOB STEELE in 
"Near the Rainbow's End" 

KNUTE KOCKNE'S (HIDDEN BALL) 
SATURDAY NITE VODVIL 

Monday. Tuesday, Nov. 24, 25 

HELEN FOSTER in 
"The Primrose Path" 
II. It. WARNER in 
"The Furies" 

Wednesday — Dreaaerware Nite 

Wednesday, Thursday, Nov. 26, 27 

BENNY RUBIN in 
"Hot Curves" 
IRENE BORDONI in 
"Paris" 



Free Free 
TO LADY I" VTRONS 
Every Monday and 
Tuesday Evenings 

GENUINE AMOSKEAG 
I. IN FN \\ ARE 



Winchester. Mass , Nov . I. 1-MU 
To the Middlesex County Commissioners: 

Respectfully represent tin- undersigned in- 
habitants of the town of Winchester, in san) 
County, that High Street, in said Winchester. 

should be relocated and specifically repaired. 
Wherefore, we pray that you will relocate 
said Hiith Street and direct specific repairs 
thereon. 

HARRY W STEVENS 
and four others. 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

At a meeting of the County Commissioners 
for the County of Middlesex, at Lowell, in 
said County, on the first Tuesday of Septem- 
ber, in the year of our Lord one thousand 
nine hundred and thirty, to wit. by adjourn- 
ment at Cambridge in said County, on the 
seventh day of November. A. D. 1W30. 

ON the foregoing petition. Ordered, that 
the Sheriff of said County, or his Deputy give 
notice to all persons and corporations inter- 
ested therein, that said Commissioners will 

meet for the purpose of Viewing the premises 

and hearing the parties at tin Commissioners' 
Office, Court House. Cambridge in said Coun- 
ty, on Friday the twelfth day of December. 
A. D. 1830, at ten of the clock in the fore- 
noon, by serving the Clerk of the town of 
Winchester, with a copy of said petition and 
of this order thereon, thirty days at least be- 
fore said view, arid by publishing the same 
in the Winchester star a newspaper printed 
at Winchester, three weeks successively, the 

last publication to be fourteen days at least 
la-fore said view, and also by giosting the same 
in two public places in the said town of Win- 
chester, fourteen days before said view : and 
thHt he make return of his doings herein, to 
said Commissioners, at the time and place 
fixed for said view and hearing. 

CHARLES T. HUGHES, 

As-t. Clerk 
Copy ,.f petition and order thereon. 
Attest, 

CHARLES T. HUGHES, 

Asst. Clerk 

A true copy. 
Attest : 

HENRY L. WALKER, 

Deputy Sheriff 
nl4-3t 



MORTGAGEE'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE 

By virtue of the power of sale contained in 
a certain mortgage deed given by John 1'. 
Whitten to the Winchester Co-operative Hank, 
dated January 6, 1930 and recorded with 
Middlesex South District Deeds. Hook 542*. 
Page ii;:, for breach of the conditions of said 
mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing 
the same will be sold at public auction on the 
premises hereinafter described on Monday, 
December 1. 1030 at nine o'clock in the fore- 
noon, nil and singular the premises conveyed 
by said mortgage deed and therein substan- 
tially described as follow s : 

"A certain parcel of land with the build- 
ings thereon situated in Winchester, Middle- 
sex County. Massachusetts, shown as Lot 

numbered 827, and seventeen il7> feet of 
Lot ."l's adjoining, on plan entitled 'Part One, 
Symnios Park. Winchester ami Medford. Mass., 
developed by Bonelli-Adams Co.,' by Ernest 
W. Branch, Civil Engineer, dated June 21. 
1326, recorded with Middlesex South District 
Deeds, Plan Hook 358, plan 11. containing 
S597 square feet more or less, bounded ami 
des. rihed as follows : 

Southwesterly by Hollywood Road, sixty- 
seven anil oil 100 (67.60) feet: 

Northwesterly by Lot 328 on said plan, 
ninety-three and s-l 100 1 93.84 J feet; 

Northeasterly by land now or formerly of 
W. W Thomas, sixty-seven (67l feet; and 

Southeasterly by the remaining portion of 
Lot :;js 0 n said plan, one hundred 1 1 00 1 feet. 

Said premises are subject to restrictions of 
record so far as in force and applicable Here- 
by conveying the same premises conveyed to 
-aid John P. Whitten by The Honelli-Adams 
investment Corporation, by deed dated Janu- 
ary 6, 1V30 and duly recorded with Middlesex 
South District Deeds, herewith." 

Said premises will be sold subject to all 
unpaid taxes, tax titles, assessments or other 
municipal liens. (200.00 in cash will be re- 
UUireil to be paid at the time of the sale and 
the balance to be paid within ten (101 days 
from the .late of sale at Room 810, 10 State 
- tie, t. Boston, Mass. cither particulars made 
known »t time of sale. 

WINCHESTER CO-OPERATIVE HANK. 

Mortgagee 
By Ernest R. Eustis, Treasurer 

For further information apply to Curtis W 
Nush, lo State Street, Boston, Mass. „7-;;t 



Ity virtue and in execution of the power of 
•ale contained in a certain mortgage deed 
given by Charles Bruce to James Otis Simonds 
dated March 21, l«2», being Document No. 
!»t...-i37. registered April 1«. 1920, and noted 
on Certificate of Title No. C".2.t in Registra- 
tion Book 41, Page M7, in the Middlesex 
South Registry District, for breach of tin 
conditions contained in said mortgage and 
lor the purpose of foreclosing the same, will 
be sold at public auction on the premises 
hereinafter described en Monday the fifteenth 
day of Dee mber. A. D. WSO, nt four o'clock 
m the afternoon, all and singular the prem- 
ises in -aid mortgage described as follows. 

t,. wit \ certain parcel of land in Winches- 
ter, Middlesex County. Massachusetts, shown 
us Lot numbered PB on plan entitled "Wood- 
side, Winchester, Mass, subdivision of Lots 
;2 to 13 Land Court Case .'•.'•12. Parker Hoi- 
brook, Engineer, dated April 30, 1927, filed 
with the Land Registration Office, a copy of 
winch -s tih.l with the South Registry District 
for Middlesex County, bounded and described 
as follows, vis: Southwesterly, Westerly and 
Northerly by Woodslde Road and Wlckford 
Itoud by four measurements Nineteen ami 
51 mo tlU.5lj Int. Eighty-two and :>! 100 
182. .ill ftet, One hundred six and 211 loo 
(106,291 feet and fourteen and 49 loo 1 14.49 1 
fe.t respectively; Easterly by the Lot No. 

One Hundred ItOO) a* shown en said plan 
(die hundred one i lol i t.,t. .southerly by 
the Lot No. *."> lis shown on -aid plan On. 
hundred fourteen and 10 100 (114.401 feet, 
and containing 12.210 square feel subject to 
the toning law requirement* oi the Town of 
V\ inchester. 

Said premises will la' sold subject to all 
unpaid taxes and municipal liens if any then- 
be. $300 will be required to be paid by the 
purchaser at the time and place of sale: other 
terms at sale. 

For further particulars apply to Dallinger 
& Stearns, attorneys, s-.i state St.. Boston, 
Mass. 

JAMES OTIS SIMONDS, Mortgagee 

n21-8t 



THE WINCHESTER SAFETi 
COMMITTEE 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. PROBATE COURT | 

To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and all 
other persons interested in the estate of ! 
Freeman Nicker*on late uf Winchester in said 
County, deceased. 

WHEREAS, a certain instrument purport- 
ing to be the last will and testament of said 
deceased has been presented to said Court, for 
probate, by GeorgianB Nlckerson who prays 

that letters testamentary may be issued to 
her. the executrix th, rem named, without ^riv- 
Ing a surety on hi r official bond. 

You are hen by cited to appear at a Pro- 
bate Court to be held at Cambridge in said 
County of Middlesex, on tin- ninth day of De- 
cember A. D. 19:10. at t, n o'clock in the fore- 
noon, to show- cause, if any you have, why 
the same should tod be granted, 

And said petitioner is hen by directed to give 
public notice thereof, by publishing this ci- 
tation once in each week, for three succes- 
sive weeks, in The Winchester Star a news- 
paper published in Winchester the last pub- j 
lication t. . be one day. at least, before said 
Court, and by mailing, post-paid, or deliver- 
ing a copy of this citation to all known per- 
sons interested in the estate, seven days at 

least before said Court. 

Witness, JOHN c. LEGGAT, Esquire, First 



01 



Judge of said Court, the thirteenth day of 

November ill t lie y . Ill Oil 
died and thirty. 

luring p. Jordan, Register 

n2l-3t 



The Winchester Safety Committee 
met on Wednesday evening of last 
week and transacted much business oi 
importance locally. 

1 hi- work of this committee has to 
do with all hazards and dancer spots 
within the boundaries of Winchester. 
Few of our citizens realize the many 
hours spent by the members of the 
committee in discussing safety meas- 
ures and visiting so-called hazards 
that have been reported by the sub- 
committee on "Dangerous Places" .>f 
which Janus ,1. Fitzgerald is chair- 
man. Ja>t now this sub-committee is 
very much interested in the dangerous 
situation at the junction of Cross and 
Holton streets whole the clown of the 
road is <o high that any speeding on 
this curve is must hazardous. 

Just below this point, at the junc- 
tion of Forest street and Brookside 
road, the curb stones are to be paint- 
ed white and black to obviate the dan- 
ger of the 101 nor. This has been 
done at the corner of White ami Swan- 
ton stieets and has earned warm 
prai-,. from those who use these 
streets. 

The committee has under consider- 
ation conditions at three dangerous 
corners, Main and Mystic Valley Park- 
way. Swanton and Washington, and 
.Main and Swanton. Safety helps ,.f 
some kind are to be recommended for 
all three, Conditions at Symnies cor- 
ner are being studied, also. 

Mis. McDonald has asked the com- 
mittee to recommend to the Select- 
men an all-day police officer inPrecinel 
I', as a means of safe guarding t he* 
school children four times a day and 
also as a means of slowing ur t.'-at". 

lie. 

The Publicity Committee of which 
Mrs. McDonald is chairman, has dis- 
tributed some splendid safety posters 
to the various stores, shops' and ga- 
rages in tow n. Th,- committee has had 
many nine demands for these attrac- 
tive posters and is sorry tint the sup- 
ply has been exhausted, In tin- work 
of distributing the posters, the pub- 
licity committee received splendid eo- 
nncration from two members uf the 
.Main Safety Committee, Chief David 
II. DeCourcy, and Chi, f William II. 
Rogers. 

The next meeting will not In- called 
for the first Wednesday in December 

hut will lake place subject to th,- call 
of the chairman, Selectman Vincent 1'. 
Clarke. 




LEGION NOTES 



SILK SALE 

10.0110 dress-length remnants of 
finest silk to be cleared by mail, re- 
gardless. Every desired yardage and 
color. AH :>,!» inches wide. Let us 
send you a piece uf genuine $<"> Crepe 
Paris (very heavy flat crepe) on ap- 
proval fur your inspection. If you 
then wish to keep it mail us your 
check at only $1.90 a yard. (Original 
price •*<; a yd.). Or choose printed 
Crepe Paris. Every wanted combina- 
tion of odors. We will gjadly send 
you a piece to look at. What' colors 
and yardage, please? If you keep 
it you can mail us check at $1.25 a 
yd. (Final reduction. Originally $0 
a yd.) 

Ail ,*2 silks, $2 satins and ?2 
printed crepes are 90c a yd. in this 
sale. Every color. Do not ask for or 
buy from samples. See the whole 
piece you are getting before deciding. 
We want to he your New York refer- 
ence so ti ll us all you wish to about 
yourself ami describe the piece you 
want to see on approval. Write 
NOW. Send no money. To advertise 
our silk thread we send you a spool 
to match free. 

CRANK'S, Silks. 545 Fifth Avenue 
New York City 



NOTK E III' LOST PASS BOOK 

in compliance with the requirements of 
Chapter l'iT. Section 20, of the General Laws 
and Acts in am, ndmenl thereof or supple- 
mentary thereto, notice is hereby given of the 
loss of Pass Book No. 15.ST1. Issued by the 
Winchester Savings Hank, and that written 
application has uei n mad,- to said bank for | 
the payment of the amount of the deposit • 
represented bv said book or for the issuance 
of duplicate book then for. 

WINCHESTER SAVINGS HANK. 

By William K. I'm si. Treasurer I 
n2l-:u 




(DMIDDLE/EX COUNT^%S5; 

AMlLr; E ME K#«|M 



TEL. MAI.DEN J711 

7 Days Starting Sat. 

Nov. 22 

MI ETON SILLS 

in 

Jack London's Greatest 
Stnry 

"THE SEA WOLF" | 

also 

ltenny Rubin in 
•HOT CURVES" 

Coming Week of Nov. ; 

the Kner" 

and | 

"A I. ady Surrender.-." 



TEL. MAI DEN 0212 

Start* Saturday. Nov 22 

Charles (Buddy) Rogers 

in the laughing hit 

"HEADS UP" 

also 

Lupe Velez, Lew Ayers in 
"EAST IS WEST" 

Today, Friday. Nov. 21 

"Her Wedding Night" 

and 

"Sante Fe Trail" 



i 



TEL. MAI.DEN 12.10 

Starts Sat.. Nov. 22 

Mary Nolan and 

Owen Moore 
in the I'ndrrmorld 
Sensation 

"Outside the 
Law" 



liuck Jones in 

"Shadow Ranch" 

Today, Fri., Nov. 21 

"All tjuiet on the 
Western Front" 





MUST 
>l O II TI* \«pi s 

Vre have fund* avail- 
able for liberal tirsl 
mort»a£es on owners' 
homes ... If you are 
planning to buy, build 
or re-finanee — write 
for application blank 
or rail at ofliee. 

LAWYERS TITLE 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

Baston Five Cent! Savings 
Bank Building 

2 1 School Street, Boston 

TtUptHhfl Liberty MM «, j 

o2«-6t 



MORTGAGEE'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE 

Ity virtue of the power of sale contained in 
a certain mortgage deed given by Thomas S. 
Richardson nnd Charlotte M. I.. Richardson, 
husband and wife, as tenanta-by-the-entirety, 
of Winchester, Massachusetts, to the Home- 
stead Cooperative Hank, of Boston, Massachu- 
setts, dated April '.'th, IllSd, ami recorded with 
Middlesex South District Deeds, Book 5462, 
l*age ■">*. for breach oi the conditions contained 
in said mortgage and for tile purpose of fore- 
closing the same, will Is, .sold at public auc- 
tion upon the promises described in said 
mortgage on Saturday, December 8th, 1930, 
at half past nine o'el.H-k in the forenoon, all 
and singular the premises described in said 
mortgage, v iz : the land in Winchester with 
tin- buildings thereon, bv'ing the premises now 
numbered 1st on Washington Street bounded 
and described as follows: Commencing at the 

Southeasterly- comer of land now or former- 
ly of John Benson, at a point on the Wester- 
ly loo- of Waahington Street, Nixty-two 't'2> 
feet South of the Southeasterly corner id 
Cross and Washington Streets thence running 
Southerly on Waahington Street fifty i",oi 
feet to land now own, si by the Town of Win- 
chester; thence running Westerly along said 
land of the Town of Winchester one hundred 
twelve and -10 mo i irj.ioi feet; thence turn- 
ing at nearly a right angle and running 
Northerly by the remaining land of these 

grantors, about fifty -five la.'il feet to the 

said land now or formerly of John Benson . 
thence running Easterly aloni: said land of 
John Benson, one hundred and lo 1 100. Si 
feet to th,' point of beginning, on Washing- 
ton Street. Containing 5390 stiuare feet of 

land he all of said measurements more or less 
Being the same premises conveyed to us by- 
Mary J. Sskc by deed dated May 1st. 1928, 
and recorded with said Deeds, Ibiok 4609, 
I'ajre 167. Said premises will be Bold sub- 
ject to any and all Unpaid taxes, tax titles, 
unpaid water bills, and municipal assessments 
If any there may 1m-. Two Hundred Dollars 
in rash to la- paid by purchaser at time and 
place of sale. Further terms to be announced 
at the sale. 

HOMESTEAD COOPERATIVE BANK, 

Mortgagee 
By William [i Eldredge, Treasurer, 

116 Brom field St., Boston 
Walter II. and Paul II Roberts, Attys., 
:il State St., Boston nl l-:;t 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the 
subscribers have la-en duly appointed execu- 
tors of the will of Daniel Webster Pratt lab! 

of Winchester in the County of Mobil 

Massachusetts, deceased, testate, and have tak- 
en upon themselves that trust by giving bonus, 
as the law directs. 
I All persons haviny demands upon the es- 
tate of said deceased are hereby required to 
exhibit the same; and all persons indebted t.. 
said estate are called upon to make payment 
to 

( II \ RLES II PR \TT 
ELMER 1> I LETCHER 

Executors 

i Address t 
2(1 George Street. 

Sonvrville, Mass. 
8 Lagrange street. 

Winchester, Mass. 

November lil.'lu nT-"t 



Winchester Post, 97, American Le- 
ition, playetl a prominent part in this 
annual entertainment stayed last s in- 
day evening in the Veterans' Hospital 
nt Bedford, under tin- auanices of i no 
Fifth District oi tin- Middlesex Coun- 
tj Council, A. I,. 

"Sonny" Beaudotte of Arlington 
was in charge of tin- program wnieh 
included vaudeville numbers and an 
hour's concert by tin- Winchester Post 
Hand. This organization has been 
making rapid - 1 1 ides of late, and pre- 
sented a splendid program. The vet- 
erans at Bedford, who boar many 
bands, were unanimous in their praisu 
and rated t he band as t he bei t heard 
at the hospital for quite some time. 
Many members of the local post made 
the trip to Bedfoi d to assis t in put- 
ting on the entertainment, 

The Post is to stage another of its 
liio; wrestling carnivals on Friday 
e\ ening, I >ec. !>, in t Ii ■ Town Hall. It. 
is planned to run several of these 
shows through the winter and the 
committee, eompris.ng Conrad Ivtirson, 
Harry Benn 'tt and W, Allan \S ilde, 

promise to maki each siiovv exc I its 

predecessor in all around class. Don't 
i'orgel the date of (In- curiam raiser, 
I be. 5, 

Tin- Post's recently organized drill 
team started with a membership of 
I'.'. Weekly i|i ill- are to lie held mi 
Wednesday evening under the direc- 
tion <>f Harry Bennett. 

NEWSY PARAGRAPH*! 



NOTICE 




The SYMMFS PARK WATER 
TOWER COMMITTEE will hold 
a public hearing at eisiht o'clock 
on Monday evening, December 1, 
19.{0, in the small Town Hall. 

J. Harper Blaisdell, Chairman 

Charles R. Ma : n. Secretary 

John F. ( ay-sidy 

Lafayette R. < hamberlain 

Arthur W. Hale 

James Hinds 

Thcmas Quiglej . Jr. 



Mr. Ii aniel B. Badger of Prospect 
st. eet. president of the E, B. Badger 
Company, coppersmiths of Boston, has 
been Hon. nod with the presidency of 
the famous old Schoolboys' Associa- 
tion of Boston. Mr, Badger r< ntly 

observed bis golden wedding anniver- 
sary but still attends to business and 
retains his interest in many activities 
outside the business field 

Invitations are out for the wedding 
of Miss Ann.- E. Bresnan, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Bresnan of ■: 
Morris street, North Cambridge, to 
Patrolman John J. Murray of the Win- 
chester Police Depa tment. Patrol- 
man Murray and .Miss Bresnan arc c> 
he married at a nuptial mass in St. 
John's Church. North Cambridge, on 
Thanksgiving Day. 

Mr. Walter L Rice of 2W Mystic 
Valley Parkway showed the Star a fin<> 
specimen of Christmas rose, freshly 
picked from his garden on Wednes lay. 

A Ford coupe, driv* n by M b. Mau le 

I!. Hitchcock "f o Copley street, and 
a Reo sedan, operated by Mrs. Annie? 
S Lane of 37 Cl«-n road, were in col- 
lision Tuesday forenoon on Mt. Ver- 
non street in front of Randall's. The 
Ford was pulling away from the curb- 
ing while thi Reo was going east. No 
one was injured. 

Tuesday forenoon Emile Lanontagne 
of 183 Sea street, Weymouth, reported 
at Police Headquarters that his Gard- 
ner sedan had its i- i ^ t front mud- 
guard and running board smashed by 
a stone which rolled down the side of 
the hill north of Fernway as he was 
driving the machine along cam!, ridge 
-treet. 



*V if § 

M DINNER $3.00 



Old Fashioned 
Thanksgiving 



RfcNCH 

VILLAGE 

£ »«*l-«;'SK?W»»-r»««s»«»s-T-jSs»». 



Sal. Lunch with ..'anrinir. SI Ilinncr, $1 .70 up 

No Convert C'harye for Dinner 
SO MINIMUM I HARtiE 




***** 




AUDITORIUM 



10 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1930 



316 Highland Avenue 

We an- privileged to offer for long term lease the unusu- 
ally-attractive estate created and Formerly occupied i»> Her- 
man Dudley Murphy. The lions.-, undoubtedly one of the 
most artistic in Winchester, commanding a perfect panorama 
«»f the West Side hills i- of English half timber and stucco 
style and i- being entirely renovated by the owner. It con- 
tain- a commodious li\in<: room with massive fireplace, en- 
trance ball and dining room finished in ilark beamed oak, 
kitchen, iw> servants' chambers and dining room: also chil- 
dren's playroom and den on the first door: there are <» family 
chambers, two tiled bath- and upper li\ini: room with fire- 
place on the second floor: the tliird floor contains one large 
chamber and ample storage space. The grounds, a veritable 
park in themselves, comprise nearly three acres of land and 
include many unusual shrubs and plants, a gravel drivewrfy 
and <:arafie for two ears. \ very advantageous lease will be 
given to a responsible family. 

SHOWN ON in VPPOINTMENT WITH 



Edward T. Harrington Inc. 



REALTORS 



39 CHURCH STREET 



WINCHESTER 1400 




ONCE A WEEK 

is not too often to have Bailey's drivers 

call for a suit to be 
Brushed Clean, Sponged and Pressed 

75c 

BAILEY'S CLEANSERS & DYERS, INC. 



17 Church St. 
Winchester, Mass. 
Tel. Win. 0528 



Watertown, Mass. 
Tel. Mid. .1561 



— • HOSIERY ♦ unDtftWCAR-GlflS ~ 

Dresses for the Holiday Specially Priced at $8.95 & $14.75 
Hosiery from 95c to $2.50 per pair 



Automobile 
Insurance 

$3 down 

LOWEST RATE OF INTEREST IN THE STATE 
BALANCE IN SMALL MONTHLY PAYMENTS 
WELL KNOWN STRONG COMPANIES 

L. W. PUFFER, Jp. 

557 MAIN STREET WINCHESTER 
TEL. WIN. 1980 — RES. WIN. 1160 



oSl-tf 



This Is A Good Time To Buy 

. PRICES ARE LOW 

Ladies' Black Kid Gloves, $1.0C 

Horsehide Hockey Mitts 

The "Royal Road to Romance'' 

By Richard Halliburton 
A Wonderful, Fascinating Book of Adventure 

Reduced From $5.00 to $1.00 
"All the King's Horses," the Latest Novel 

By Margaret Widdemer, Only $1.00 
Ladies' Fine Silk Scarfs and Pajamas 

Visit Our Toy Counter 
Infants' Dresses, Jackets, Bootees, Bonnets, 

Mittens, Slips, Shoes, etc. 

Franklin E. Barnes Co. 

Til. Win. 0272 



VERNON W. JONES 
Suburban Real Estate 

31 CHURCH STREET 

QUAINT REPRODUCTION of a Connecticut home with at- 
tractive features throughout. Six rooms and bath, fireplace, hot 
water heat, n-ara^e, fine location. Priced exceedingly low. 

RENTALS— Manj 
$45 to $150. 



attractive single homes and apartments at 



TELEPHONE WINCHESTER 0898 




DUTCH COLONIAL $11,600 

Seven Rooms — Two Tile Baths 

Thi< i.-= a new home and was built by 
skilled workmen from the best materials. The 
rooms are large anil comfortable and there is 
an extra lavatory on the first floor. It is ideally 
located on the West Side on a lar^e corner lot. 
There is a garage and the price means a reduc- 
tion of over $3,000. Very reasonable terms 
can be arranged. 

RENTALS 

Many single homes to rent in the best locations. 
For an appointment to inspect call Mr. Puffer. 

HENRY W. SAVAGE, Inc. 

273 HARVARD STREET, COOLIDGE CORNER, BROOKLINE 
Kst - ,M0 REALTORS Asp. 1504 

WINCHESTER OFFICE, 557 MAIN STREET, TEL. WIN. 19M) 
RES. TEL. WIN. 1160 




Walter Charming, Inc. 

REALTORS 

EXCHANGE— SHARON FOR WINCHESTER 

High (lass. 8-room semi-bungalow. Fine location, beautiful 
grounds, modernized, with oil heat. Price $15,000 for attractive, 
high-grade Winchester property. 

EXCEPTIONALLY PLEASANT 

Home on a corner lot of a beautiful side hill, close to center, 
a well built, 8-IOom house, and garage. Fine view across town. 
Large living room, 1 fireplaces, furnace heat. Priced $9000 to at- 
tract quick sale. 

Tel. Winchester 0984 
Helen I. Fessenden Resident Representative 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



NEWSY P \RAGR APHS 



First Church cf Christ, Scientist, 
Winchester, cordially invites you to 
a free public lecture on Christian 1 
Science by Miss M. Ethel Whitcomb, 
C.S.B., of Boston a member of the 
Hoard of Lectureship of The Mother ■ 
Church, The First Church of Christ. 
Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts, 
on Friday evening, Nov. 21, at 8 
o'clock in the Town Hall, Winchester. 1 

The Misses Lucia and Ann McKcn- 
zic of Heminway street were guests 
of Mrs. Lee Mellett at a dance held 
Tuesday evening in the Copley Plaza. 

R. R. Barron and L. F. Brown of 
this town were among the 128 fresh- 
men to be pledged to fraternities at 
the University of Vermont this year. 
They were pledged to Kappa Si^ma. 

Sea Food >>f all kinds. Cotuit oy- 
sters on half shell our specialty. Win- 
chester Sea Food ShoM, 612 Main 
street, tel. Win. 2230, Free Delivery. 

o31-5t 

The Horace Ford Shoppe is featur- 
ing a special Thanksgiving ice cream. 
Place orders early. Tel. Win. 1907. 

Emma J. Prince, Chiropodist, Mas- 
seuse, hours 9-12. !-•">, closed Wed- 
nesday afternoons. Tel. Win. 0155. 
13 Church street. sl2-tf 

Showing of felt and velvet hats by 
Miss M. A. Shirretf. An attractive 
line of Christmas cards and handker- 
chiefs. Common street, Winchester. 

Kelley & Hawes Company's new n-a- 
rage will b e open and ready for busi- 
ness Pec, l. n21-2t 

Place your order early with the 
Horace Ford Shoppe for their special 
Thanksgiving ice cream. Tel. Win. 
1907. 



First Church of Christ, Scientist, 
Winchester, cordially invites you to 
a free public lecture on Christian 
Science by Miss M. Ethel Whitcomb. 
C.S.B., of Boston a member of the 
Hoard of Lectureship of The Mother 
Church. The First Church of Christ, 
Scientist, in Boston. Massachusetts, 
on Friday evening, Nov. 21, at 8 
o'clock in the Town Hall, Winchester. 

n7-3t 

The many friends of Supt. Alex 
Macdf.nald of the Park Department 
will regret to learn that he is ill at 
his home on Washington street. His 
condition is considered serious. 




JUNIOR COUNTRY CLUB 

40 Winn Street, Woburn 

GOLF— mo»t hrauliful miniature courne 

in New Enitland. 18 hole* 30c; Me- 

oud round 35c. 
DANCE — Snappy band. Friday and 

Saturday Evening*. 75c per couple. 
EAT — Delicioua toasted aandwichea. 

Light ref reahmenU. 
Come in and nee our attractive club- 
hou«e. Open 12 noon to 12 midnite 

SUNDAYS I P. M. to 11 P. M. 

n7-4t 



WASHINGTON IRVING 



"Imagination and ability 
are the fertile hills, sereni- 
ty the sunshine that should 
bathe them." 

HPHERE is a serene quality 
that bespeaks expert di- 
rectorship about tin- occa- 
sions wherein we officiate. 



M0FFETT and McMULLEN 

Funeral Directors anil 
Embalmers 

TEL. WIN. 1730 

Lady Assistant Taxi Service 



CHARLES HAGUE 

Cabinet Maker 

Antique* Rentored — Furniture Made and 
Repaired— Iphalatered and Polished. 
SHOP. K PARK ST.. WINCHESTER 
Tel. Win. 1S4S-W 

. nl5-tf 



DO YOU LIKE DISTINCTIVE DRESSES 
FOR YOUR LITTLE GIRL? 

Then see the new hand-made frocks at Esther's. The 
models shown may be ordered in any fabric or color 
you desire, and in any size up to ten. If you appreci- 
ate style, good materials and exquisite workmanship, 
don't fail to see these, at 



11 

it 



i i 



NORMAN V. OSBORNE 

Carpenter and Builder 

1 CLIFF ST. W INCHESTER 
Tel. Win. 2024-W 



oI7-tf 



BLANCHARD 

for 

LUMBER 



A. M. EDLEFSON 

REAL ESTATE & MORTGAGES 

FOR SALE 

ON THE WEST SIDE — Near th* station, in a quiet location. 
9-room house, is a maximum of comfort at a minimum expense; 
oil heat, electric refrigeration, 2 baths, pleasant gas kitchen, one- 
ear garage. The house is in excellent condition inside and out 
I he price is .? 1,1.000. 

THREE excellent building lots on Wcsl Side. 



10 STATE STREET, BOSTON TEL. HUBBARD 1978 

Winchester Office, 2 Thompson Street 

Res. Tel. Win. 0700 



Tel. Win. 2285 



We are as near as your telephone 

P. H. HIGGINS WINCHESTER 0606 



17 KEN WIN ROAD 



Commercial and Home Photographer 

If you have pictures to he framed a 
telephone eall will bring demonstrator. 

Leave your films at Hevey's Pharmacy 
or Star Office for our usual service. 



FOR SALE 



NEAR CENTER. New six-room house with sun-room. Three 
sunny chambers, tile hath, steam heat, garage. Good location. 
Financed to suit buyer. Price $8500. 

RENTAL. Six-room apartment, fid per month. 

S. V. OLSON 

572 .MAIN STREET WINCHESTER 
Tel. Win. 01)32 — Res. 0365 



■HO-tf 



RENTALS 

We have at present a number of attractive single 
houses which can be rented at very reasonable figures, 
the rents varying from $75 a month to $156. 

If you are thinking of renting a single house, let us 
submit our list. 



A. Miles Holbrook 

24 Church St.— Win. 1250 Res.— Tel. 0609 

STEPHEN THOMPSON, Win. 0103-W 



Silk Hose Sale 

An all silk chiffon, with a double pointed heel, in a splen- 
did line of colors, all sizes 8" to 10 2 . These have 
always sold at a much higher price. While this lot 
lasts $1.00 per pair or 3 pairs for $2.75. 

We are also closing out our L 275, Rayon Stockings. 
These have always been sold for $1.00 per pair. 
While our stock lasts the price will be 69c. 

AGENT FOR CASH'S WOVEN NAMES 



G. Raymond Bancroft 

Til. Win. 0(7 1 - W IS Ml. VtruM Stmt 



THE WINCHESTER STAR 



VOL. L NO. is 



WINCHESTER, MASS, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1930 



PRICE SEVEN CENTS 



A Lecture 



Christian Science 

Entitled 

Christian Science: 
The Angelic Message 

by 

MUs M. Ethel Whitcomb, C. S. 15. 
of Boston, Massachusetts 

Mi mi., r i.f th... Board of Lectureship "f The 
Mother Church, The Firyt Church of 
Chri.st, Scientist, in Boston. 
M aaaachuaetta 



ALEXANDER MACDONALD 



'I'h" lecturer was introduced by 
Dr. Hubert N. Bernard, First Read- 
er in First Church of Christ, Scien- 
tist, Winchester, who said: 
Fi iends: 

On behalf of First Church of 
Christ, Scientist, Winchester, I wel- 
come you here this evening. Mary 
Baker Eddy, the Discoverer and 
Founder of Christian Science, showed 
great spiritual discernment in all the 
steps she took for the promulgation 
of the divine truths that had been 
revealed to her. These steps in- 
cluded the establishment of the 
Board of Lectureship of The Mother 
Church. The First Church of Christ, 
Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts. 
(Continued to page 9) 



MYSTIC SCHOOL NOTES 



On Thursday, Nov. 20, Grade 1 
gave an assembly, the subject of 
which was history: 

Thi' Story ..f the Norsemen. Helen Farnsworth 

Lett the Lucky Gray Twombly 

Reail by Mary Haskell 
Columbua, n story . . Told by Conatance Bond 
Sonu William Fotrif, Priacilla Howard. Jeanc 
Howard, Woleott Cary 

A Play "The Fountain of Youth" 

Ponce det.eon Gray Twombly 

Spanish Sailor- Herbert Hopkins, Raymond 
Murdoek, David Livingstone, Frank Sylves- 
ter, Whltelaw Wrisrhl, Allen Abbott 
John Cabot, a readinx • Richard Busbee 
The Story of fortes . .. Patricia Underwood 

Read by Jeane Howard 
Cortes Attacks the Indiana,. Herbert Hoi .k i ns 
Read by Madeline Collins 
\ Play "Uiacoverlns Hi" Pacific" 

Balboa Joseph Burton 

Spanish Sailors Richard Rowe, George Rudd, 
Gi-oritc Hebb, Richard Knudaon, William 
Blanchard 

Sons Fourth Grade Girla 

The program was announced by 
I'at ricia Underwood. 

UNION THANKSGIVING SERVICE 
II Kid) 

The annual Union Thanksgiving 
service, under the auspices of the In- 
terchurch Council, was held last Sun- 
day afternoon in the Church of the 
Epiphany. Rev. Howard J. Chidley, 
pastor of the First Contrrotrati 
Church, read the Governor's Than 
giving Proclamation, and the Scrip- 
ture lesson was read by Rev. Ben- 
jamin Patterson Browne, pastor of 
the First Baptist Church. The 
Thnnksgiving sermon was preached 
by the Rev. J. West Thompson, pas- 
tor of the Crawford Memorial M. E. 
Church. Rev. John II. Whitley, 
pastor of the Second Congregational 
Church and Rev. George Hale Reed, 
minister of the Unitarian Church, sat 
in the chancel with the Rector of 
the Epiphany, Rev. Truman Hem- 
inway. There was congregational 
singing, with the organist of the 
Epiphany, Rev. John II. Yates at the 
organ, 

BAPTIST WOMEN HELD RECEP- 
TION FOR MISS CRAWFORD 



The Women's League and th" E. I'- 
ll, and Philathea Classes, represent- 
ing the women of the First Baptist 
Church, held a reception last Friday 
evening in the church social hall in 
honor of Miss l.ydia .Jennie Craw- 
ford, newly returned missionary to 
China, at home for a year's leave of 
absence. Women's missionary socie- 
ties from the other churches of the 
town attended the reception. The 
social hall was simply, hut effective- 
ly decorated with cut flowers and 
crepe paper. 

In the receiving line with Miss 
Crawford were Mrs. Benjamin P. 
Browne, Mrs. Charles A. Burnham, 
Miss Lizzie Johnson and Mrs. Leon 
Leavitt. Members of the Women's 
League ami the E. P. H. Class served 
as ushers. 

The evening was delightfully in- 
formal, the entertainment being pro- 
vided by Mrs. Deering who told in- 
triguing little Japanese fairy stories 
which were much enjoyed. Dainty 
refreshments were served. 



Alexander Macdonald, Superinten- 
dent of Winchester's park ami play- 
ground system and a widely known 
resident of the town for more than 
half a century, died Sunday after- 
noon, Nov. 2.'?, at his home, 1-11 Wash- 
ington street, after a three weeks' 
illness. He was HI years old. 

Mr. Macdonald was the son of Peter 
and Jessie (Ferguson) Macdonald and 
was born in Charlotte town, P. E. I. 
He attended the public schools and 
grew to manhood in Charlottetown, 
coming to Boston when HI years of 
age. 

For a time he lived in Woburn 
where he learned the leather business 
in the Loring Tannery, but at the 
time of his marriage to Miss Louisa 
Dupee of this town, 52 years ago, he 
came to Winchester and had since 
made his home here. 

For more lhan 30 years Mr. Mac- 
donald conducted a market in the cen- 
ter and was at the time of his death 
one of the few old line merchants re- 
maining in Winchester. Retiring 
from the provision business, he was 
employed by the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict Commission for a time and 11 
years ago entered the service of the 
town as Superintendent of the Park 
Department, which position he held 
until his death. 

Genuinely fond of flowers and the 
care of shrubbery and lawns, Mr 
Macdonald labored faithfully and 
happilv in the interest of the town, 
and the beautifully kept park sys- 
tem bore eloquent testimony to his 
ability and care. He was especially 
interested in the care of the common 
and grounds about the War Memorial 
and few visitors can e to Winchester 
who did not remark upon their splen- 
did appearance. 

His position in the town brought 
him in constant contact with many, 
and he enjoyed a wide circle of friends 
among citizens in all walks of life. 
His tall figure could he seen about 
the center in all weathers and there 
was little sign of his advanced years 
in his erect, vicoroua bearing. 

Mr. Macdonald was an active work- 
er in the First Baptist Church, serv- 
ing for many years as Superinten- 
dent of the Sunday School and later 
as a member of the Deacons' Board. 
He was an Odd Fellow, and a mem- 
ber of William Parkman Lodge of 
Masons. 

Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. 
John J. Winchester and Mrs. Alfred 
O. Wold, both of Winchester; and 
Mrs. Laurence Nutting of Waterman, 
Cat. Four grandchildren, Katherine 
Tufts Weld and Elizabeth. Robert 
Macdonald. and Jean Winchester, all 
of this town, also survive. 

The funeral services were held on 
Wednesday afternoon in the First 
Baptist Chtirch with the Pastor. Rev. 
"Benjamin Patterson Browne, officiat- 
ing, Town officials and representa- 
tives of both William Parkman Lodge 
of Masons and Waterfield Lodge of 
Odd Fellows attended the service's. 
Three favorite hymns, "Faith of Out- 
Fathers," "The Old Rugtced Cross" 
and 'The Strife Is O'er." were sunn 
hy th" Church Quartette. Bearers 
were Daniel C. Linscott. Charles A. 
Burnham, Harry C. Sanborn. Harry 
T. Winn, William A. Snow. J Albert 
Hersey, members of the Deacons' 
Board of the church, and Arvard L, 
Walker. Interment was in Wildwood 
Cemetery. 



C. I). OF A. NOTES 



An ntmosnhere of sadness per- 
meated the Court members last week 
when the death of our past treasurer. 
Mrs. Katharine Kean, was announced. 

On Friday night the entire mem- 
bership of the Court visited the home 
of our late sister on Linden street, 
where, led by G. R. Frances T. Con- 
Ion, the rosary was said and the svm- 
pathy of the Court was extended to 
the bereaved family. 

On Saturday morning when impres- 
sive services were held at St. Mary's 
Church, the following officers acted as 
honorary bearers: G. R. Frances T. 
Conlon; treasurer. Elizabeth C. Mc- 
Donald; Historian. Katharine F. 
O'Connor: V. R. Mary E. Martin. 
Trustee Mary McKenzie; Sentinel. 
Nora O'Melia. 



FORTNIGHTLY NOTES 



On Monday, Dec. 1, at 2:30 o'clock 
all members of the Fortnightly yvno 
are interested in literature are invited 
to enjoy the studv of Manuel Kam- 
roff's "Coronet." Mis. Helen H. Mur- 
ray and Miss Mary L. Hodge will re- 
view and analyse the hook, after which 
there will !>e an open discussion. 

It is urged that all who can attend 
the Eighth District Conference at the 
Medford Women's Club on Dec. 2 at 
10:30 a. in. 

The Art Committee invite all club 
members to go with them to Mrs. 
Jack Gardner's on Tuesday, Dec. 2, 
on the train leaving Winchester Sta- 
tion at 1 p. m. For further informa- 
tion, call Mrs. Blanche Barnard, Win. 
1624. 

Thursday, Dec. 4, is Veteran's af- 
ternoon. The Co-operation with War 
Veterans Committee will have open 
house and tea at Fortnightly Hall. 
There will be an entertainment con- 
sist iny: of solos by Mrs. Mollie Ma- 
guire, readings by Mrs. Frances Con- 
lon, and dancing by the Goodhue sis- 
teis. Articles made by the hoys at 
the Bedford Hospital will be on sale. 
The purpose of this entertainment and 
tea is to finance the Christmas gifts 
for the needy veterans of Winchester 
Mid their families. Hutchinson's Mar- 
ket is co-operating with this commit- 
tee; they will remind their customers 
of the Fortnightly Veteran's Day and 
offer to deliver direct to the commit- 
tee anything one may wish to donate. 
To those whom this service may not 
ti ach and who are at a loss as to what 
form their donations may take, the 
c< mmittee suggest srifts of money or 
toys as well iis seasonal supplies. 

The third reuilar meeting of the 
Fortnightly was hold on Monday, Nov. 
24, with the president, Mrs. Christine 
E. Hayden, in the chair. At the close 
of the business meeting, Mrs. Hayden 
graciously introduced Dr. Albert H. 
Gage, pastor, author, and widely 
known lecturer. His personality was 
OS penial as his subject, "The New 
Fashioned Home:" was intercstinjr. 
"Everybody is interested in some 
home," he said, "and everybody can 
learn new things to improve home 
continually." As a minister for 25 
years, Dr. Gage has visited many 
homes and finds that though conditions 
may seem to differ over a period of 
years, yet at all times the number of 
successes in home-making far out- 
number the failures. 

Antinques, considered of little value 
in olden days, are priceless today, so 
too are many of the rugged charac- 
teristics, without which we should be 
poor indeed. They are always up-to- 
date and should be brought into the 
new home where they will fit as do 
the old pieces of priceless furniture. 
As in Gothic architecture with its 
deen perpendicular walls held togeth- 
er by buttresses and arches, so in 
home life do we need the same but- 
tresses, inside and outside strength, 
with spiritualties at the top to per- 
fect the "New Fashioned Home." Ac- 
cording to Dr. Claire, the four quali- 
ties needed for the home to survive: 
first, love, which sufforeth lonir, is 
kind, and sees the spirit; second, re- 
ligion, without which one of seven 
homes is wrecked; third, a sound phy- 
sical basis, the art of livincr together 
in harmony: and fourth, a trained in- 
tellect to grasp the problems pre- 
sented. There is cominp: a time when 
daughters will specialize on courses in 
honio-niakinjr. Trained brains are 
necessary. To brinir up a child re- 
quires much study and all successive 
stages of life must b- understood bv 
the parents. A child has three dif- 
ferent stapes through which to oass: 
a physical crisis at 12 to 14 years, a 
pc'al awakening at 1"> or IB years, 
and an intellectual crisis at 18 or 19. 
Have faith in them, give them much 
love and sympathetic understanding, 
for home life is really the life of the 
children in the home. At the close of 
the lecture, tea was served and a so- 
cial half hour enjoyed. 



KILLED WHEN PINNED BE- 
TWEEN TWO CARS 



MANY 



THANKSGIVING BASKETS 
DISTRIBUTED 



Alva E. Burke, 61, of 120 Summer 
street, Maiden, lost his life about 5:30 
Thanksgiving Day afternoon when he 
was pinned between two cars on Main 
street about 30 feet this side of the 
Medford line. 

According to the police account of 
the accident Burke's car. which was 
being driven by his wife, Mrs. M. 
Alice Burke, was in collision with a 
Chrysler sedan, driven by Wayne B. 
Thompson of 3 Crescent road. " 

The latter told the police he was 
driving his car south on Main street 
which was icy from the snow storm. 
As he approached the Medford line 
he saw Burke's car parked at a 45 
degree angle at the side of the road. 
He applied the brake-- to his own ma- 
chine, but was unable to stop. Pull- 
ing into the gutter, his mat bine skid- 
ded along into the Burke car. a Buick 
sedan, which was damaged by the col- 
lision as was Thompson's car. 

Burke was taken by Mr. Thompson 
and passing motorists to the Win- 
chester Hospital where he was pro- 
nounced dead upon arrival. Medical 
Examiner Vernon Stewart of Woburn. 
who viewed the body, stated that death 
had been caused by a punctured left 
lung. 5 fractured ribs and injuries to 
the head, hip anil chest. 

The icy condition of the roads, cov- 
ered with snow which fell during the 
mid-afternoon blmard, made motor- 1 
ing treacherous, and numerous minor 1 
accidents were reported to the police 
during the afternoon and evening, 
none however, involving serious con- 
sequences, 

Supt. of Streets Parker Holbrook 
got onto the job right away and hail 
the men and trucks of the Highway 
Department out during the late after-! 
noon and evening sanding the streets 
about town. 



-Mere than 12.", Thanksgiving bas- 
Kets. brimming with good things 
were delivered during the afternoon 
and evening of Wednesday to the less 
fortunate families „f Winchester who 
lor one reason ,„■ another found 
themselves unable to secure provi- 
sions for the holiday independently. 

I he baskets were delivered under 
the direction „f the Citizens' Com- 
munity Welfare Committee with the 
personal supervision of George T 
Davidson, Nathaniel M. Nichols Mr' 
Lowen Tufts. Mrs. Edward II Ken- 
erso,, and Miss Nellie Sullivan. \ 
flying squadron of Elks under the di- 
rection of George II. Loehman, chair- 
man of the Elks' Welfare Committee 

did much of the work of delivery 

About 89 of th." baskets WPIe ' ,'„•,,. 
vided by the Elks, with the Red Cross 
1 hapter, Girl Scouts and various 
churches of the community providing 

the others. The baskets' were se- 
cured through tlh' kindness ,,f Charles 
W. Meek of the Atlantic X- Pacific 
< o. and Carter A; Younjf's Fells Mar- 
ket. The Sunday School of the First 
Congregational Church contributed a 
large sum of money for the purchase 
of turkeys, and it was possible to put 
either a turkey or chicken in each of 
the baskets delivered this year. 

Never before have the school chil- 
dren given so bountifully to this 
worth while project. A partial li-t 
of the provisions donated bv the 



COMING EVENTS 

Nov. 29, Saturday Annual play nnd dane* 
given by Metcalf l inen. In Unitarian Parish 
llnuse at .» p m. 

I'.v i. Monday, The Literature Committee 
..f ttu- Fortnightly will review "Coronet" by 
Manuel Kami. .it at 2:S0 p. in in Fortnightly 
Hall. 

Dec 1. M,.n. lay, i.. m Arlington Street 
Parish Hall. Boston. Monday Conference of 
Unitarian Alliance Branch**, Mrs. Arthur G. 
Kobbina, presiding. 

I'.c J. Tuesday. Regular meet Inn of the 
Winchester l.,..!*,. „r Elk*, s ,. ,„ Lyceum 

Dee. 2, Tuesday, :.' p. m Unitarian Parish 
Hen-,-. Christmas Razaar. Supper at 6:46 
p. in. Tickets t\ Tel. Win. 0208-W 

Pec J. Tuesday High School Parent- 
teacher Association meets in hiuh school as- 
sembly hull at s p ni. The speaker of the 
evening will I..- Albert II. Gage. D.D. of Wake- 
field, All parents of high school iu 

cordially invited to attend. 

!»<>• 3, Wednesday. 2:80 p, m. 'I'h.- regu- 
meeting of th,. Women's Republican Club 
will U- held at Association Hall 

Dec. | Thursday. Open Hons,, at Fort- 
nightly Hall w ith entertainment and t. a Co- 

I rations with War Veterans Committee is 

nuMi t. 'us . 

Dec. :.. Friday, s 30 p, m. Group Nine 
and Bridge, First Congregational 
/■an-h Parish House, pall Win. 0841 for 

Dec. Saturday. Byrd Pictures In Town 
nail at 3 and s ,„ Auspices Wadleigh 
Parent readier Affiliation. 



includes. 9 bushels of potnti 



DAVID 1). COATES 



David D. Coates, 72, landscape gard- 
ner for the Boston & Maine Rail- 
road for 12 years, died Tuesday at his | 
home in Lowell. He had been in fail- 
ing health since last August, when he 
retired because of illness, 

Mr. Coates had been a resident of 
Lowell for 43 years, but in past years j 
had his offices in Winchester where he 
was knnn to many residents, especial- 
ly in the Wedgemere section of the 
tow n. His landscape gardening achive- 1 
merits were many and during his ca- 
reer with the Boston & Maine he won [ 
innumerable prizes for his work. 

He was a member of St. John's 
Episcopal Church in Lowell and the j 
Massachusetts Grand Court of the 
Jforresters of America. Besides his 1 
•^viiV. Martha Contes he leaves four 
brothers, John, Frank, William and 
Richard Coates all of England. 

Funeral services were held this Fri- 
day afternoon at 2:30 p. m. 



13 bushels of apples, 2 bushel of car- 
rots, 2 bushels of onions, 6 bushels nf 
oranges and grapefruit, 50 largo 
squash, 20 cabbages, ~." pounds 0 f 
turnips, one dozen bunches of celery, 
one-half bushel of cranberries, 25 
pounds of nuts, 20 pound* of granes. 
4 dozen bananas, and 35 pounds of 
sugar, besides numerous packages of 
jello and figs. 16 packages of raisins, 
8 packages of prunes, with coffee, 
milk, bread, cookies, cakes. 300 cans 
Of vegetables, 150 cans of fruit, 22") 
jars of jelly, 1 plum puddings together 
with sardines and mince meat. 

The assembled provisions gathered 
together in the old vestry of the First 
Congregational Church was a really 
unusual sight, and to the uninitiated 
a source of wonder as to how it would 
ever be portioned out and delivered. 

Chief among the workers were 
Mrs. N. M. Nichols. Mrs. Harry San- 
born, Mrs. Bowen Tufts. Mrs." I). C. 
Dennett, Mrs. G. H. Loehman, Mrs. 
George T. Davidson and Miss Nellie 
Sullivan. Sunday School boys from 
the Congregational Church and Girl 
Scouts .assisted the Elks with the 
work of sorting and delivering. 



CHRISTMAS ISSUE DEC. !? 

The annual Christmas i-s. u . 
of the Star will be published on | 
Hoc. 12 this year. As usual th * 
edition will contain extra pag< > 
and spec al holiday feature*. 
Merchants desiring space should 
notify this office immediatel) 



OUR OFFER 

In accordance with our usual 
custom, all new subscriptions lo 
the STAR received up to the 
first of the year, will be given 
a January (irst dating. This of- 
fer applies only to new subscrib- 
ers who have not previously 
taken th's paper. Subscribe now 
and receive the remaining issues 
this year free. 



MRS. ELIZABETH A. RUSSELL 



The new funeral service of John 
Bryant Sons, in Woburn, has opened 
its office at 15 Montvale avenue, and 
presents a very attractive appearance. 
The firm of John Bryant Sons has 
been established since 18">2, in Winter 
Hill, Somerville, with a branch in 
Charlestown and now a new branch 
in Woburn. Mr. Bryant is giving his 
personal service. 



Mrs. Elizabeth II. Russell, wife of 
William Russell and a former resi- 
dent of Winchester, died Monday, 
Nov. 24, at her home in Marlboro, 
after a long illness. Mrs. Russell 
was T.'i years of age and besides her 
husband leaves two sons, one now- 
chief of police In Bridgewater. The 
funeral was held Thanksgiving af- 
ternoon at th" late residence with the 
Rev. P. G. Beatty of the Marlboro 
Baptist Church officiating. Interment 
was in Maplewood Cemetery, Midden. 



DR. ASHLEY HAY LEAVITT 
Orean Recital 



The special preacher Sunday even- 
ing at the First Baptist Church in the 
series of notable preachers being 
heard under the topic "If I Had < Inly 
One Sermon to Preach" will be the 
Rev. Ashley Day Leavitt, D.D. of the 
Harvard Congregational Church of 
Brookline. Or. Leavitt is so well 
known everywhere as to need no in- 
troduction to Winchester. A 'are 
treat is in store for those who are 
present on Sunday evening. 

An organ recital will be given by 
Mr. Sargeant of Lexington as an in- 
troduction to the service and the pop- 
ular sohust. Miss Lillian Evans will 
sing. The musical features of the 
service are by the courtesy of Mr. 
Harry Sanborn. 



Norman von Rosenvinge, Gordon 
Gillette, Donald Bates, Gordon Ben- 
in tt and Hurt let t Godfrey are at 
home for the Thanksgiving vacation 
from Bowdoin College. 



ST M \RY'S DRAMATIC SOCIETY 
PRESENTED "OH, KAY!" 



Traveling from Santo Domingo to 
Miami on his way home. Mr. K. A. 
Ekern of Highland avenue, chief en- 
gineer for the firm of Chase & Gil- 
bert. Inc., made the stretch aboard 
one of the tine new 12-passenger air- 
liners of the Pan American Airways, 
Inc. 



NOTICE 




The SYMMES PARK WATER 
TOWER COMMITTEE will hold 
a public hearing at eifcht o'clock 
on Monday evening, December 1, 
1J»30. in the small Town Hall. 

J. Harper Blaisdell. Chairman 

Charles R. Ma ; n, Secretary 

John F. Ca«sidy 

Lafayette R. Chamberlain 

Arthur W. Hale 

James Hinds 

Thomas (Ju gley. Jr. 



A Tribute to Mrs Katharine Kean 

When one would write a kindlv 
word of a sister member of the type 
that Mrs. Kean was. words seem 
emnty and futile. Her sterling worth 
and splendid character are so well- 
known to her host of friends that 
mere descriptive words seem toneless. 

The place that past treasurer Kean 
has left vacant in the hearts ,,f the 
C, D. of A. will always remain un- 
filled. Her love of right made of her 
a dauntless soldier, with a courage 
that was an inspiration to her fid- 
low members. 

Her humor, her ready sympathy, 
her warm, kindly charity are by- 
words with those who knew and 
loved her. Memories of her will 
make us carry on. working always 
that not onlv we. but those in need, 
may be the better for having known 
one with a character that was made 
trulv beautiful through the divine gift 
of faith. 

Six times during the past ten 
months God has summoned from our 
membership splendid women — splen- 
did workers: and each blow has 
seemed heavier than the last. 

Only the knowledge of the fine 
membership standard of those who 
have answered that divine summons 
and the beautiful memory of the help 
and fellowship that they have left us. 
will enrble us to carry on in the great 
work of unity and ch'aritv. 

E. C. McD 



Francis Hooper. Henry Brown, 
Henry Newman. Bradford Hill. Rus- 
s*»l] Davis. Frederick Sanborn. Gordon 
Hindea and Frank Carleton were in 
Winchester to enjoy their Thanks- 
giving vacation from Dartmouth. 



St. Mary's Dramatic Circle pre- 
sented the three-act farce comedy, 
"Oh. Kay!" Wednesday evening, Nov. 
26 in the Town Hall. A matinee was 
held for the children. Saturday af- 
ternoon at 2:30. The performances 
were under th'^ilirection of Miss Ann 
Matilda Gurney. 

The capable actors were warmly 
applauded for their skill and talent 
in portraying the different parts. 
There was something doing every 
minute in the way of thrills, surprises 
and laughs. "Cramp" with his fliv- 
ver and its never-ending accessories 
and "Cram" with her habit of try- 
ing every patent medicine on the 
market were a couple of comedy rob s 
which kept the audience in constant 
laughter. "Kay" Millis, the girl de- 
tective, was a strong part well acted. 
"Art" and Edith both appealed to the 
audience by the simplicity of their 
part. The "Black Terror" who is the 
cause of all the trouble kept the audi- 
ence guessing all the time. 

Dancing was enjoyed after Wed- 
nesday night's performance, music 
being furnished by Joyce's Orchestra. 

The cast and summarv follow: 

Edith Whitman ... Mary Debaurier 

Evelyn Whitman, her mother 

Gertrude OVonncll 
Arthur Whitman, her brother. Thomas Trav.rs 
Capt. GeorKe Whitman, her father 

Thomas Dolan 

"Gram" Pembroke I-orettA Donnelly 

Alice Bonien Helen Roherty 

The "Mack Terror" Jonerh Culhn 

"Gramp" Pembroke Roy MrCrath 

Jim" Hayes William Callahan 

Kay Millis. of the Millis Detective ABency 

Susan McFartlancI 

I"re<l AWen Vincent Ambrose 

The entire action of the play takes place 
in the livinK room of the Whitman family 
in th« course of one evening 

A few moments elapse between Acts 1 and 

Actl 2 and 3 are continuous. 

Ushers- Howard Ambrose Thomas Fahey. 
Charles McCormack, Walter Drohan. John 
Flaherty. Irving- Reardon. 



PUBLIC HEARING 

On Removal of Symmes Park 
Water Tower, Next Monday Night 

DECEMBER 1, at 8 P. M. 

TOWN HALL 



All persons interested in the removal of this unsightly water tower 
which seriously effects the appearance of the whole town and reduces the 
valuation of a large section, are urged to attend this hearing. 

This structure is not in accordance with the spirit of the zoning ordi- 
nance and the problem is capable of another solution. 

HELP PRESERVE THE TRADITIONAL SEAUTY OF WINCHESTER 

Carlisle W. Burton 
Albert K. Comins 
Donald Heath 
Alfred H. Hildreth 

Town Meeting Members 



•J 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2S. )930 




PAYMENTS ON THIS YEAR'S CHRISTMAS CLUB 



CHECKS WILL BE MAILED TO MEMBERS ON DECEMBER 3rd 



OCTOBER DIVIDEND ON REGULAR DEPOSITS 
AT THE RATE OF 

5% 

Winchester Savings Bank 

26 MTVERNON ST. /0^^^ WIN CHESTER, MASS. 

BUSINESS HOURS 8A'.MTO3PMS^^Ss^SATURDAYS8/iMT0IZM>7J0830.RM 



INCORPORATED 1871 



COUNT ZARYNOFF TO FEATURE 
LEGION WRESTLING SHOW 



WILLIAM CALDWELL 



Your Holiday Bridge Party 

will be a real success if you choose your prizes from our 
varied and unusual selection of the newest ideas. 

WHIST AND BRIDGE PRIZES 25c to $1.50 

Winter Sport Champions 

are strong for the Ace Sport Cap. It has just the warmth 
and speed and flash they want. No other cap fits so 
sleekly to the head. No other cap has the vavid up and 
down color stripes. 

BOYS' CAPS 75c— GIRLS' CAPS $1.00 



Winchester Dry Goods Co. 



540 MAIN STREET 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S SOCIETY 
DANCE 



The informal dance held :it the 
Congregational Church under the 
direction of the Young People's Sn- 
ciety last Friday was the first <>f the 
season and most successful. 

The young people acquired the 
services of George Varney's peppy 
orchestra which added greatly to the 
success of the dance. The chaperons 
were: Mr. and Mrs. Harry (!. Nichols, 
and Mr. and Mis. George S. Tomp- 
kins. 

The committee in charge included 
Olive Boutillier, Mabel Tompkins, 
Katherine Chamberlin, Lucy Fowle, 
Elizabeth Packer. Madeline Little, 
Daniel West, Kenneth West. 



i 

TEL. WIN. 2255 I 



ENG AG K M EN T A N N ( ) I NCED 



The engagement is announced of 
Miss May Lees, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. George Cooper Lees, formerly of 
Leominster and now of Pass-a-Grille 
Beach, Fla., to Mr. Ralph Emerson 

; Stevens, son of t^rs. Ralph E. 

I Stevens of Marlboro and the late Dr. 
Stevens of Marlboro. Mr. Stevens 
was graduated from the Loomis 

j School ami from Harvard in 1923. 

! The announcement was made from 

'the home of Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm 
Bruce Lees of Winchester last week. 



William Caldwell, a former resi- 
dent of Winchester, passed away at 
his home in Andover, Thursda, Nov. 
20, after a long illness. 

He came of an old Scotch family 
and was born in Elgin Province of 
Quebec, Canada in 1812 He came to 
this country while a young man and 
entered the employ of what is now 
the United Shoe Machinery Company 
at Worcester. He moved with this 
company from Worcester to Law- 
rence, then Winchester and Beverly. 
He was an inventor and at the time 
of his retirement at Beverly, he was 
considered the world's authority in 
his special line of work. 

He was an earnest Christian and 
an active member of the Baptist 
churches in his various home towns. 
IK' officiated as deacon for over 35 
years. He made friends wherever he 
went and was loved and admired for 
his bright cheery disposition. 

In 1867 he married Miss Mary Lu- 
cinda Ross of Worcester who passed 
away at Winchester in 1900, Their 
two sons and a daughter survive them 
Charles H. Caldwell of Southbridge, 
Frederick W. Caldwell of Montreal, 
Canada and Mrs. H. Earl Richardson 
of Kenwin road, Winchester. He 
leaves two sisters, Miss Margaret 
Caldwell of Andover and Mrs. Peter 
Ferguson of Dundee, Canada. 

In 1903 he married Miss Martha 
Nichols of Lawrence who died in 
1916. 

Services were held at the First 
.Baptist Church in Andover on Sun- 
day. Nov. 23 at 1 :30 p. m. Dr. Nor- 
man Bartlett. pastor of the church, 
officiated, assisted by Rev. C'ary 
Chamberlain of Beverly. 

The committal service at the fami- 
ly lot in Bellvue Cemetery, Lawrence, 
was conducted by the Lawrence Lodge 
of odd Fellows, of which the deceased 
had been a member for many years. 



The Leprion announces a spectacular ', 
card for the first wrestling show of ] 
the season to be held in the Town 
Hall, Friday evening, Dec. 5, which I 
sparkles with stars of the mat game. 
The committee has arranged for j 
three amateur bouts starting at 8 
p. m. bringing together some of the 
best-known amateur wrestlers in 
greater Boston, all capable expon- 
ents of their chosen art. They have 
arranged a card of professional bouts 
equal to many of the shows at the 
Boston Arena which will bring to- ! 
gether Paddy Mack, the heau-brum- 
mel of wrestling circles of Philadel- 
phia vs Stuart Spears, an aspiring 
Lithuanian of Albany. N. Y., who 
will wrestle for one fall with half 
hour limit; for the second bout. Sailor 
Arnold of Cleveland. Ohio, who was 
recently thrown by Sonnenberg af- I 
ter a hard spectacular bout, vs Nick : 
Scotus, a veritable Grecian Apollo of 
Boston who will wrestle for 45 min- 
utes or one fall. These boys have 
met on two occasions before, each 
taking one fall and a sparkling bout 
seems assured. 

The Post has been fortunate in se- 
curing as the feature bout of the 
evening, a match which will go to a 
finish between the well-known jump- : 
ing Count Zarynoff who has featured 
many shows in Boston and who, last : 
year, drew the largest house in his 
match with Sonnenberg ever knovjn , 
in a wrestling match at Boston Gar- 
den for which bout the tickets brought 
from $2 to $5, who will meet on the 
mat, Jack Albright of Chicago, known ! 
in wrestling circles as "The man of 
a Thousand Holds." 

The tickets for this wrestling car- 
nival are going rapidly, but may be 
obtained from any member of the 
Post, Hcvey's Pharmacy. Winches- 
ter News, and Frank Zafhna's barber 
shop on Main street. Reservations 
may be made also by telephoning 
Winchester Legion Headquarters any 
evening. 

Popular prices will prevail —ring- 
side seats at $1 with many good seats 
available at ">0c. The proceeds from 
this wrestling carnival are to be used 
by the Past to assist in their welfare 
work, for which there is much more 
demand this year than in any year 
since the existence of the Legion 
Post. 

The sporting fans of Winchester 
will not only see a good show but the 
money made from this entertainment 
will go towards a worthy and neces- 
sary cause. 

Do not forget the date, Friday, 
Dec 5 at the Town Hall. 

TH VNKSGIVING DAY AT CHRIS- 
TIAN SCIENCE CHURCH 



was as follows, from pape 78: "Spirit 
blesses man, but man cannot 'tell I 
whence it cometh.' By it the sick are 
bealed, the sorrowing are comforted. 1 
and the sinning are reformed. These 
are the effects of one universal God, 
the invisible good dwelling in eternal 
Science." 

Brief testimonies expressing grati- 
tude for fruits of healing, progress, 
and regeneration following the appli- 
cation of Christian Science were giv- 
en. 

The elasinsr hymn was 130, after 
which the First Reader read the Sci- 
entific Statement of Beinp from the 
Christian Science textbook, and the 
correlative Scripture according to 1 
.John .3:1-3. The benediction from 
Col. 4:2 concluded the service. 



Bradford Hill, who is attending 
Dartmouth returned home fjr the 
holidays. 



The Jordan-Wakefield Co. 

Chair Makrr* for 40 Years 

ARE CONTINUING THKIR 

FACTORY SALE 
Of Fine Reed and 
Rattan Furniture 

Sold Direct from Factory to You 
AT UNPARALLELED VALUES 
ConiisUnf of Living Koom Suite*. Sun 
Koom Suite*. Individual Piece* and Nov- 
elties. Ah an Example We Offer 
LIVING ROOM S1ITES— M.-> J200 
Thin Stock U the Eilient We Manufacture 
DO VOIR XMAS SHOPPING HERE ! 
Rear No. J38 Main St.. Wakefield. >!«>». 

Opp. i'ublic Lihrary 
Delivery Service Tel. Crystal 0<I06 



BYRD PICTURES 
WINCHESTER TOWN HALL 
SATURDAY. DEC. 6 

2 Shows 

3 P. M. — Tickets 10c and 20c 
8 P. M. — Tickets 50c 

Glee Club in Evening 

Tickets of Mrs. Cleaves 
Tel. Win. 1121 

Wudleiith Parent Teacher AwMK-iation 

nl I-2S-U5 



Packard 

Appearance and 
Protection 



DRESS TOP 
SIMONIZE CAR 
LACQUER ALL FENDERS 
WASH CAR 
LACQUER ALL SPLASH 
APRONS 
PAINT RUST SPOTS 
LACQUER BUMPERS 
VACUUM INSIDE 
POLISH NICKEL 
PAINT TIRE RIMS 

$40.00 

MAKE YOUR CAR 
LOOK LIKE NEW 

Anderson Motor Go. 

666 Main St., Winchester 

METROPOLITAN GARAGE 
632 Main St. Win. 1053 

Chrysler 



W EST ERN MISSION AR Y 
SOCIETY 



The Clarence A. Henrys of High- 
land avenue were members of a party 
of IS who dined on tho holiday in the 
Boston Athletic Association clubhouse 
on Exeter street. 



The Medford and Middlesex Chap- 
ter members of the DeMolay are op- 
posing the Alumni in football Satur- 
day on the Fulton street grounds at 
Medford. Both teams have been 
working hard all season and from all 
accounts it promises to be a great 
game, Part of the proceeds are to 
go to the Shriners' Hospital for 
nippled children in Springfield. 



The 
Society 
Church 
I from 

Board 



.••hi auHtiHHtttitiHiiiMitiainmNNHciiimiitiuitJiiiitnnttiniiNmimipiniiiiiiiiiaiH 



The Day After Thanksgiving 



i- u-.li a I K a tired one. with a 
heap <>(' tiling* to do . . . ami a 
heap of soiled table linen, too! 

\\ hy not bundle this all up, and 
phone for our salesman to call. 
\\ Ik ii i! i- returned beautifully 
laundered, you will he more than 
pleased. 




New England 
^ [«iundrics,|nc. 



CALL \\ INCHESTER 2100 



Winchester Laundry Division 

CONVERSE PLACE, WINCHESTER 
Launderers Cleansers Dyers 



Ladies' Western Missionary 
of the First Congregational 
will meet on Thursday, Dec. 
10 to 4. 
meeting at 11. 
Luncheon at 12:15. 
Chairman, Mrs. A, 
1. 0683-W. 
Business meeting at 2 p. m. Speak- 
er. Miss Hilda Torrop, Superinten- 
dent of Nurses, at t ho Winchester 
Hospital. Come and hear this rep- 
resentative of your local hospital and 
enjoy an interesting talk. 



II. Mortensen, 



The Thanksgiving service held at 
First Church of Christ, Scientist was 
■ well attended. 

The service opened with the sing- 
ing of Hymn No. 86, which was fol- 
! lowed by the reading by th" First 
I Reader of the Thanksgiving Procla- 
mation of the President of the United 
pStates. The Scriptural selection was 
taken from Psalms. 

The congregation was then re- 
quested to join in a few moments of 
silent devotion followed by the audi- 
ble repetition of tho Lord's prayer 
with its spiritual interpretation as 
iriven in the Christian Science text- 
book. "Science and Health with Key 
to the Scriptures," by Mary Raker 
Kd.lv. 

Hymn 161 followed. 
The subject of the lesson-sermon, 
which followed the singing of hymn 
101, was "Thanksgiving," and the 
Golden Text was from the 97th 
Psalm: "Rejoice in the Lord, ye right- 
eous; and give thanks at the remem- 
brance of his holiness." The respon- 
sive reading from Psalms ;».">:l-7: 
1 47:1-5. 7 was read alternately by the 
First Reader and the congregation. 
One of the Scriptural passages con- 
tained in the lesson-sermon was from 
Malachi 3:10: "Brine ye all the tithes 
into the storehouse, that there may 
i be meat in mine house, and prove me 
! now herewith, saith the Lord of hosts, 
if T will not open you the windows of 
heaven, and pour you out a blessing, 
that there shall not be room enough 
to receive it." 

One of the correlative passages 
from the Christian Science textbook 



Kelley & Hawcs Co 

funeral Directors 



LADY ASSISTANTS 



SERVICES RENDERED IN ANY PART OF STATE 
TELEPHONES: WINCHESTER 0035—0174—0106 



Service, with us, means anticipating the needs and desires of 
our patrons so that they need not concern themselves about the 
slightest detail beyond telling uk thiir wishes. 

kUi-tf 




Lucilla^Perry Hall 

SCHOOL of DANCING 

Ballet — Tap — Musical Comedy — Ballroom 

Coaching of Amateur Productions 
Dancers Available for Clubs and Entertainments 
Circular sent upon request 
Telephone: Kenmore 61 18 
12 HUNTINGTON AVE. (Copley Sq.) BOSTON 



1 



$ 



5 



Will put in an electrir floor pine 
in any room on the first floor of 
vour house. 

E. C. SANDERSON 

THE ELECTRICIAN 
Tel. 0300 



For RHEUMATISM take 

BUXTON'S 

RHEUMATIC SPECIFIC 

You will not rmret It. For »ale at Htvry's 
Pharmacy. I rt un swid you a booklet. Ruxton 
Kheumatir Mrdirine Co.. Abbot Village, Mo. 



If You Like Good Things 
You'll Buy 

A. A. MORRISON'S 

FINE CANDIES 

and 

Home Made Pastiies 

Made in Winchester 
Fresh Every Day 

Clara Catherine Candies 

A. A. Mo.rison 
19 M I. VERNON STREET 
TEL. WIN. 0966 



HALL'S MARKET 

75-77 PLEASANT STREET MALDEN 

Importers of 



1 



From Lunhan Bros., Cork, Ireland 

Distributors of 

S. S. PIERCE FANCY GROCERIES 
SWIFT'S GENUINE SPRING LAMB, GOLDEN WEST FOWL, 
PREMIUM CHICKENS, HEAVY WESTERN BEEF, 
NATIVE PORK 

o24-tf 



Weed Chains 
Sleet Wands 
Prestone 

Deleo Batteries 



Denatured Alcohol 
MobiloilinCansorBulk 
Glycerine 



FOR SERVICE RECHARGING AND STORAGE 
ON ALL MAKES CALL 



26 Church Street, Winchester 



Tel. 1208 



nil-tf 



r iii[jiimii!imr]iiiimi:ti!C]i; i:iit]i:iniiiiin[:HiiiniiiMC]iinniiMiiuii!iiHiiiiiniiiiiiiiii!i[r.iiii':iiiii::iiiiiiiiniiC]iiMiiiiiHiC3iii!iiiii^ 



PHARMACY FIRST 

KNIGHT 

WINCHESTER SQUARE WEST, AT CHURCH STREET 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28. 1930 



3 



WINCHESTER DEFEATED SAU- 
GUS 13 TO 3 




Eight times inspected and checked 

HOOD'S GRADE A MILK 

is surely best for your baby 

INSPECTORS select the dairies. Veterinaries test the cows. Inspectors supervise farm 
conditions and methods. Veterinaries regularly examine the cows. Milk is inspected 
and tested at the country receiving stations. Milk is checked again at the city pasteur- 
izing plants. The Hood laboratories make more than 250,000 scientific tests yearly. 
Then when the bottles are filled, they pass before the trained eye of an expert. 

Eight times in the production of this fine milk direct supervisional contact is made. 
Nothing is left to chance or guess. Every factor relating to the quality, safety and cleanli- 
ness of Hood's Grade A is built on scientific precision. The result is uniformity, dependa- 
bility, unvarying fine quality, with a delightful natural flavor that babies and children love. 




HOOD'S 

GRADE A MILK 

From Tuberculin Tested Cows 
Delivered Fresh from Farm to Home 7 Days a Week 
H. P. HOOD & SONS, Dairy Experts 



WEST MEDFORD, MASS. 



Telephone MYSTIC 0710 



Tune in "H. F. Hood & Sons Modern Concert" 
Wednesdays -W. B. Z. -W. B. Z. A.- 9:00 P. M. 



1114 H MILK-Berter than legal require- 
ments for Grade A Milk. Rich all 
through. 

ri.EAX MILK -From clean cows, 
produced under rigid supervision- 
Hood's standards are three times as 
strict as State laws. 

TESTED «'OW*- from cows tuber- 
Clllin tested under State ami Federal 
supervision, and then especially se- 
lected by our own inspectors. 

CI.EAX BOTTLES— Bottles are scientifi- 
cally cleansed and sterilized by the 
most modern equipment in New 
England. 

SEALED BOTTLES— Double sealed 
to prevent tampering or contami- 
nation. 

PASTKI'BIZED — With the most mod- 
ern and scientifically correct methods 
and ecjuipment. 



Winchester High won its last foot- 
ball game before the Woburn classic 
last Saturday afternoon, defeating 
Saugus High, 13 to 3, on Manchester 
Field. 

Tin' game was on the whole well 
played and interesting. The locals 
were (riven just the right sort of 
opposition l>y Saugus which brought 
a big hard fighting club to Winchester, 
backed by a small but vociferous 
cheering section led l>y the of the 
niftiest cheer leaders seen at the 
playground in quite some time. 

Saugus kicked off and Knowlton 
and Wilmer Smith crashed merrily 
"if the tackles for n couple of tirst 
downs which took the ball to the 
Saugus 45-yard line. Here Lundblad 
got away for a 20-yard jaunt, and 
two line bucks !>y Smith and Knowl- 
ti n took the ball to the Saugus 1">- 
yard line where the visitors held for 



After 
Chester 
with a 



an exchange of kicks Win- 
was ea'.lod for interfering 
. Saugus forward, giving the 
visitors a first down at midfield. Sail- 
gus was forced to kiek. and when 
Tofuri fumbled the visitors recovered 
on Winchester's 8-yard line. 

Two tries at the Winchester line 
lost 1 yards and on the next play, the 
second of the new quarter, Temple- 
man dropped back and shot oil" a 
pretty drop kiek from an angle for 
the lirst :! points of the game, 

lie and Hii key went in for Lund- 
blad and Tofuri and Saugus kicked to 
Colpas who plowed straight down the 
field to tlie Winchester 38-yard line. 
After a couple of ineffective linebueks 
1 ee ran to a lirst down at lllidtiold. 
<)n a pass play a Saugus secondary 
intercepted hut dropped the hall when 
ho was hit hard by Procopio, Win- 
chester was called for unnecessary 
rouirhness and the hall wen! back to 



Kn 



wit 
Saip 
Play 



the 



quick- 
5-yard 
break 



l>ack to kick 
was through 
s boy never 
lough he ap- 
ither for the 



BARN AND LIVE STOCK DE- 
STROYED IN TWO 
ALARM FIRE 

A two alarm lire destroyed a small 
barn and shed at the home of Wil- 
liam Irwin. IS Ridge street, last Sun- 
day afternoon, burning to death two 
cows, eight breeding pigs ami a num- 
ber of small pigs, besides destroying 
ten ton of hay and a quantity of 
farming implements, The estimated 
damage is $2000. 

The tire hail gotten a good start 
before it was discovered and the tire- 
men upon arrival had no chance to 
save the building. The first alarm 
was sounded at 1:40 and was quickly 
followed by another, bringing all the 
local apparatus to the scene of the 
tire. 

Chief DeCourcy stilted that the lo- 
cal apparatus was bothered very 
little by traffic while on the way to 
the fire, and attributed this good 
fortune to the fact that none of those 
who feel it their duty to drive auto- 
mobiles to every tire which occurs in 
Winchester knew where Box 222 is 
located. 

The run to Irwin's is a hard one. 
due to the winding nature of the 
road and the stiff upgrade experi- 



enced from Cambridge street up 
High street. The Arlington appara- 
tus, which has a shorter run from its 
Massachusetts avenue house, pre- 
ceded the Winchester Department 
to the tire and had a line of hose laid 
before the arrival of the local tire- 
men. 

Upon their arrival the local De- 
partment laid two 1000 foot lines of 
hose, making three lines with that 
of the Arlington Department. Four 
pumps were available for duty at the 
tire. The water pressure from the 
I hydrant was very poor, placing an- 
I other obstacle in the path of the fire- , 
men. The fire had gotten too good 
a start to make the saving of the 
building possible, and most of the 
live stock in the barn perished in the 
flames. 

Eleven year old Norman Irwin 
made a plucky attempt to rescue one 
of the cows from the burning build- 
ing, but was unsuccessful and in turn 
had to be pulled from the barn by 
his mother. The dense smoke from 
the burning hay made the work of 
the firemen doubly difficult anil it was 
5:45 in the afternoon before the all 
out whistle was sounded. 

Meanwhile at 1:50 p. m. Box 43 
came in for a grass and brush fire 



in the rear of the Eastern Felt Com- 
pany on Canal street. Under the 
old inter-communicating system be- 
tween Winchester and Woburn the 
Hatter department would have an- 
swered this box immediately. As it 
was with the entire Winchester De- 
partment at the Irwin fire the Wo- 
burn department had to be sent for. 
Fortunately the brush fire was in- 
consequential and was extinguished 
without damage by the Woburn 
piece which then proceeded to the 
Central Station to "cover in" until 
the arrival back at quarters of En- 
gine 1. 



DAY AND NIGHT 



WINTER WILL COME 



(Written for The Winchester Star) 

Meek Autumn's sullen foe impatiently stands 
On the horizon near of Nature - * view. 
At the .-ad sight the sweetly colored lanil* 
Killed with the failing woodland's hectic hue. 
For Winter's darkeninit reiirn prepare the 
way. 

Of Him at whose command the sun stands 
still. 

. Nor dares to send to earth his gladdening 
ray 

Filled with the feeling of the coming doom 
Of Nature's Kracious deeds, the heavenly hill 
Hides its »ad. shudderinK face in cloudy 
Bloom 

A whispering silence overhangs the scene 
I As if awaiting the dark Winter's utorm. 

Eugene Bertram WUlard 



Day and night in S.'l different coun- 
tries and colonies around the world 
you will find the Salvationists ever 
engaged in their work, actually serv- 
ing the interests of humanity. 

No doubt, the nearest place of in- 
terest to you will 1m> Winchester. 

Because the patns of your feet are 
laid upon the highways and not down 
in the shadows, you may not be al- 
together aware of the work the Sal- 
vation Army is carrying forward. To 
the less fortunate, however, we are 
well known. 

Here in Winchester, we have an 
excellent example of the Army's 
ability to develop to meet every 
emergency. 

Our work is a many-sided affair. 
Our offices are kept busy with the 
many requests, which come to them 
each day. 

There is the spiritual side. There 
, are many agencies that can afford 
advice, but could not offer the relig- 
ious help that is needed; they can 
clear up the bodies, but not the souls, 
of the derelicts of the city. The Sal- 
. vation Army itself is helped by those 
who can help them, 
i We have now reached over the 



$1000 mark. Just about one-half of 
our quota of $2000 reached for the 
Salvation Army drive of Winches- 
ter's annual appeal. 

Send in your checks now, please to 
Charles E. Barrett, Winchester Trust 
Company, as the Salvation Army is 
now overwhelmed with requests for 
aid. due to unemployment, etc. 

Signed by Lieut.-Col. Paul K. Moul- 
ton, chairman; Charles E. Barrett, 
treasurer and members of Winches- 
ter Salvation Army Advisory Hoard. 



the 35-yard line, 
l icked outside at the 
line and on the nexl 
came. 

Templeman dropped 
and the Winchester Mm 
very fast. The Saug 
kicked the ball at all t 
parently dropped the l< 

boot. 

"Stiii-/." DiMinico recovered the ball 
for Winchester on the 1-yard line and 
Wilmer Smith hit behind "Dan" Smith 
for the score Lee failed to kick the 
goal. 

Shortly before the half ended Win- 
chester staged an offensive drive 
which came to nothing when the lo- 
cals were penali/ed five yards for 
stalling on the Saugus 20-yard line. 

Starting the new half both clubs 
were forced to kick twice and the Sau- 
gus second boot rolled across the Win- 
chester goal line. Knowlton and Fee 
made it tirst down, but once again 
Saugus braced and Fee kicked to the 
Saugus 40-yard line. On the next 
play Winchester lost 15 yard- for pil- 
ing on after Mobbs had made a pretty 
tackle and two plays later Templeman 
got loose for a jaunt to Winchester's 
33-yard line. Four yards were reeled 
off ' through the line before Saugus 
fumbled and Winchester recovered to 
end the third quarter. 

With the ball at the Winchester 20- 
yard line Knowlton failed to gain. A 
pass, Smith to Fee made 0 yards and 
Wilmer crashed through the line for 
a first down on the 15-yard line. Here 
Knowlton, running behind pretty in- 
terference got away cleanly and ran 
to the 20-yard line before he was 
tackled from behind. 

Knowlton got one and Lee, seven 
yards, but Hickey fumbled, recovering 
however to save the ball. < >n the next 
play Fee dropped back and zipped 
through a pretty puss right down the 
center to Knowlton wh<> sidestepped a 
couple of would-be tacklers and ran 
for the score. Fee booted over a pret- 
ty goal from placement, and Coach 
Mansfield began to send second and 
third string players into the game. 

Following the kick-off two penalties 
for offside against Winchester helped 
Saugus to a first down on the locals 
45-yard line. Here the visitors tossed 
otr'a short pass which was intercepted 
by Colpas who was downed on the 
Saugus tti-yard line- On the first 
play Lundblad reeled off 21 yards, go- 
ing to the 25-yard line. Saugus 
braced and took the ball on downs. 
DiAppela was hurt on the last play 
of the si quence, and was helped off 
the field with a broken jaw. Saugus 
got a 15-yard penalty for roughing 
"Dan" Smith, the first instance of a 
team getting penalized for manhand- 
ling the big Winchester tackle all sea- 
son. 

The visitors had to kick, and after 
Knowlton and Tofuri had made a first 
down the visitors braced and took tie' 
ball at midfield. On the next play 
Saugus tried a long forward which 
was intercepted at Winchester's 25- 
yard Ime by ('apt. "Hon" Emery as 
the game ended. 



The summary 

WINCHESTER 

DiMinico, le 

Hitchborn, le 

Flaherty. It 

Daley, It 

Colpaa. Ik 

Procopio, Ik 
I.ampee, Ik 
Ambrose, r 

Bottger, c 

]>. Smith, rx 

Symmes, rg » > . 

Emery, rt 



SAUGUS 
re. Cameron 

...rt. quint 

nr. dlmski 



Diet Experiment 

Experiments undertaken to study 
the effect of diet on monks in the 
vegetarian monasteries of the Trap- 
plst, Carmelite and Carthusian orders 
and on meat-eating monks attached 
to Benedictine and Franciscan mon- 
asteries show that vegetarian monks, 
even In old age, have a normally low 
blood pressure, while their meat-eating 
brethren, in spite of monastic life, 
have as high blood pressure as the 
ordinary man of t tie world. 



rhh. 



Hitchborn, re. . . . 
Motibs, re 
DiAppela, re 

Tofuri, qh 

Hickey, qb 

riurney, Qb 
Knowlton. Ihh 
Tarnuittie, Ihb. 
Lundblad, rhh. 

I.e,., rhh 

W Smith, fb 

LeRoy. fh 

Score Winchei 
.lowns W. Smitl 
after torehdown . 
man li. feree Campbell. Umpire 
Linesman Roberts. 



C, Day 

. . .e. Hob's- 

lir. Riley 

. ..Iir. Nelson 
. .Ii. Devine 
It. Newberry 
| e Woodman 



FoKtl r 
Gate* 



Templeman 
,rhb, O'Nell 

Ihh. Muxzey 

Ihh. Laskey 

fh. Oljey 

' fb, Baker 

r 18, Saugus l. Touch- 
Knowlton, Point for uoal 
Lee. Field kobI Temple- 
Brown. 



Many Varietiea of Ant. 

There are said to be more than S.30C 
species of auts. 



Christiana Divided 

"Visible church" is an ecclesiastical 
term meaning the church as seen by 
man, not as it appears to Ood. it In- 
cludes the whole body of professing 
Christians, while the Invisible church 
consists only of those who are worthy 
in the sight of God to be members of 
hii church.— Washington Star. 



THK WINCHESTER. MASS. STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28, i930 



THE MAYOR AND MAYORESS IN 
AMERICA 



Impressions of Winchester, Mass. 

An Almost Royal Reception 

The Hampshire Observer welcomed 
the Mayor home again after his Amer- 
ican visit, and svhen his Worship and 
the Mayoress (Mr* Collis) alighted 
from the train on Wedensday after- 
noon at four o'clock, looking in the 
best of health, he assured our repre- 
sentative that they had had almost a 
royal reception in Massachusetts, a 
16-cylinder, UO h. p. car being plated 
at their disposal, with a police escort 
of three motor-cyclists. Hurry and 
bustle everywhere, hut with it all a 
courteous and considerate welcome to 
the representatives of Winchester, 
England. 

Extracts From the Mayor's Diary 
Perhaps there is no better way of 
giving an account of the doings of 
Councillor and Mrs. Collis in America 
than by quotations from the Mayors 
diary, which commences with a de- 
scription of "Massachusetts as we saw 
it." 

Arriving at Boston City (writes the 
Mavor) I find it a very large and busy 
place, a large port with many Indus- 
trie-; a go-ahead city. ( 

Next an impression of Boston a 
Mayor James M. Curley, records the 
writer, is an Irishman and a very 
clever f» How, "and gets a good salary 
with a r'.x.d many extras." (The quo- 
tation is ours.) At least, SO 1 am 
told. ., ., 

Winchester is eight miles north- 
wcm of Boston, and touches the west- 
ern side of the Fells. It is one of the 
most picturesque towns in the metro- 
politan region. Ms natural beauty in 
wooded hill ami vale, rivers and lakes 
(the Mystic Lakes) is unsurpassed, 
and this beauty has been worthily pre- 
served in t he building up of the town. 

fitct, I have never seen such a nat- 
ural lay-out. There seems to be a 
beautiful mound to build each house 
upon. Everywhere is beautifully 
wooded, and they are very hue trees 
too The colouring, also, is very won- 
derful. The red and yellow maples, 
ami all the other autumn tints, accen- 
tuate the beauty of Winchester, and 
have never seen anything to equal u 
in our country. Most of the houses 
have a large piece of well-wooded land. 

The roads are g I. There are some 

nice flower gardens, hut these are not 
too plentiful. Winchester is part of 
the land originally "ranted to ( harles- 
t OW n bv Hi- General Court in 16-W and 
If, in. 'Th-ee hundred acres ol lanu 
were granted to the Rev. Zaehanah 
S\ mines, the first minister of < narles- 
town, in I«34. and a portion of this 
land is -till owned and occupied by his 
descendants in the eighth generation. 
] t is interesting to note that the hook 
K iven to me to he presented to the 
schoolchildren of Winchester. Eng. 
land, was presented by a descendant 
of the original Symmes. The area of 
Winchester, Mass., is GMs square 
miles. 

Monday 

The "I.aconin" was due to arrive at 
Boston on Sunday, Oct. 12th, hut she 
was many hour- late. The Mayors 
diary records:- 

Arrived at Boston Harbour 8 p. m. 
Remained on hoard "Laconia" until 
early morning breakfast, 0 a. in., and 
then awaited arrival of U. S. Revenue 
Cutter with reception committee, com- 
nriaing Selectman Harris S. Richard- 
Bon (chairman of the Tercentenary 
Committee) and Mrs. Richardson, 
Chairman Harry W. Stevens (of the 
Board of Selectmen! and Mrs. Stev- 
ens Commander Richard Parkhurst 
(port Commandant ). and other repre- 
sentatives. The cutter arrived about 
7 a m . and through the efforts of 
Commander Parkhurst, a member of 
the Boston Port Commission, the usu- 
al port formalities were waived, and 
we were taken up the harbour on the 
cu tter while two fire-boats cave ex- 
hibition drills and sounded their si- 
rens m honour of our arrival. 

We had made many friends during 
our outward passage on the "Laco- 
nia " and had a rousing send-off >N 
hundreds of passengers and officials, 
and bouquets were presented to the 
Mayoress. 

Having arrived at the docks, motor 
cars were waiting, and with Motor 
Cycle Officer J. F. Hogan leading the 
W av took us to the residence of the 
Hon' lewis Parkhurst. on Oak Knoll, 
•is their guests, our fust stopping 
place in Winchester. Mass. We were 
met bv our hosts immediately the car 
pulled up at Oak Knoll, and a very 
warm welcome was extended to us 
i n these words: "Walk right in. and 
the invitation enme from their hearts. 
We certainly walked into a delightful 
home in its' truest form. Many dis- 
tinguished Winchester residents called 
with cordial greetings, and with in- 
vitations to their various homes. Aer 
oplanes had grceu 

lovelV bouquet- w 

r an earlv lunch, we were ta t- 
16-cylinder UO-h. p. car (which 
dv been used once to convey 
trine 'he American 
to take part in the 
. Parkhurst accom- 
• ress. and with me 
art. ilills. Our host, 
Parkhurst, drove in 
sing a chaise which 
grandfather in 1830. 

was wonderful. The 

ik nearly two hours 

{Wen point By request 1 
be and official chain ( which 



us overhea 1. anil 
•re presented. 



Aft. 
en '11 : 

had o 
(Jen. Persh 
Legion ffcr 
procession, 
panied the 



:ng i 

»de) 
Mr 
Ma' 



was my 
the Hon 
the proc 
Wt<i driv 



•aide." C 

Lewis 
>ssion, u 
•n by his 



of well over 100 performers played a 
concert programme under the direc- 
tion of Noble Walter Smith, who him- 
self played two brilliant cornet solos. 

As the dusk fell on Manchester 
Field the visiting Shriners staged one 
of their spectacular drills. Three 
squads went through manoeuvres. The 
work of the Musical Bell Group was 
extremely good. We were then driven 
post haste to our host' residence, where 
early dinner was served in order that 
we might attend the Canoe Parade on 
the Aberjona River, where hundreds 
of decorated canoes were competing. 
It really was a wonderful sight, and 
very amusing. Over 50,000 people had 
assembled, and it was requested that 
they might hear the voices of the 
Mayor and Mayoress of Winchester, 
England. We were escorted to the 
microphone and we addressed the 
crowds, and received hearty cheers and 
cordial greetings. 

The weather was beautiful, and af- 
ter a full and wonderful day we were 
driven at full speed, led by three mo- 
tor cycle police officers, who cleared 
the way, to Oak Knoll. And then to 
bed! 

Tuesday 

By car visited many places of inter- 
est. Lexington, Concord, also Con- 
cord Bridge, Saw the graves of two 
Britishers. Through Middlesex Fells, 
a lovely wooded forest, returning to 
Boston to a delightful lunch at our 
host's club. After lunch did a good 
bit of Boston by car, seeing many 
places of interest, including one of 
Henry Ford's assembling factories. 
Returned to Oak Knoll for early din- 
ner, and then arrived at Town Hall at 
7:45, Introduced to the Hon. Freder- 
ick Cook, Secretary of State for Mass- 
achusetts; the Hon. 1". F. Sayers, rep- 
resenting Mayor James M. Curley of 
Boston; also Mayor- from Woburn, 
Cambridge and Medford. The Hon. 
Lewis Parkhurst presided, an. I carried 
out the duties in a charming manner. 
The Hon. Frederick Cook brought the 
greetings of Governor Allen to the 
gathering. The Hon. Lewis Parkhurst 
introduced Mrs. Christine Hayden, 
president of the Women's Fortnightly 
Club, who extended a cordial welcome 
to thi Mayoress on behalf of the wom- 
en of Winchester, Mass., and present- 
ed Mrs, Collis with a beautiful etch- 
in/, "Midwinter in Winchester," by 
W. W. Bicknell of that town. Mr. 
William l.ewi- Parsons delivered the 
address of welcome to the Mayoress 
and myself. He spoke of the warmth 
of international relations which such 
visits as that of the Mayor and May- 
oress of Winchester. England, brought 
about, and welcomed the opportunity 
of placing the Union Jack, together 
with the Stars and Stripes, upon the 
Town Hall platform. 1 was then pre- 
sented, on behalf of Winchester, Eng- 
land, with a handsome silver Paul 
Revere howl, the gift of the town, and 
also with a personal gift, a handsome- 
ly bound Guide Book of Boston in a 
leather case, presented in the hope 
that it might assist me to find my 
way. at an early date, to Winchester, . 
Mass. On my rising to address the 1 : 
assembly the band played "God save 
the King," everyone standing to at- 
tention. It was then my pleasure and 
privilege to say a few words to them 
all for the wonderful reception they 
had extended to the Mayoress and my- 
self. Having concluded the formal 
programme, a reception was held in 
the hall. Many hundreds lined up. and 
with a hearty handshake extended 
greetings to the Mayoress and myself. 
It was really a wonderful reception: 
one 1 shall never forget. It. was now 
11 p. in., so made tracks back to Oak 

Knoll to get some sleep. 

Wednesday 

<» a. m. — Dr. and Mrs. Howard J. 
Chidley fetched us in their car and 
took us to their delightful home. My- 
opia Hill, which overlooks the beauti- 
ful Mystic Lakes and Boston. From 
here we all motored through lovely 
scenery and visited Hoods Farm and 
inspected the cattle, and then to Way- 
side Inn. now the property of Mr. 
Henry Ford, where Longfellow wrote 
many of his poems. A most interest- 
ing old house. We visited many other 
places on our way to Andover, Mass., 
where Dr. Stearns. Principal of Phil- 
lips Academy, received us, and we 
were his guests at luncheon. He con- 
ducted us over his extensive schools, 
and after another circular tour we re- 
turned to Dr. Chidley's house, where 
they held a Thanksgiving Dinner. 
There were many distinguished guests, 
including Prof, and Mrs. L. J. John- 
son, of Cambridge; Prof, and Mrs. Ar- 
thur Holeombe Several beauti- 
ful negro spirituals were sung by the 
Florida Jubilee Quartet, who, having 
heard that we were in residence, vol- 
unteered their services to entertain us, 
Retired to bed about 1 a. in., after 
having spent another full and delight- 
ful day. 

Thur-day 

Breakfast at 8:30 a. m, At 9:H0 
Miss Elizabeth Downs, a very promi- 
nent lady in Winchester, arrived with 
her car to take us to her beautiful 
home, and receive. 1 Us in the same 
hospitable New England manner, tak- 
ing us in her delightful ear to many 
places of interest, including Wellesley 
College. 

On our return my aide, Capt. Hills, 
was waiting to escort us to the Rotary 
Club luncheon, where I had a most 
cordial reception. I was presented 
with a piece of Winchester oak with 



The procession 
line of mart h to. 
to pass a 
wore in v r. 



the 



al ef Winchester. Mas 



carved 



was much admired) and we received a 
rousing reception all along the line ol 
route. 

grand procession included 
>f all arms (engineers militia, 
1 ? ldiery and artillery!, the 
m Legion (eight drum and bu- 
rrs with detachments), veterans 



[The 
troops • 
colonic. 
Amerie 
gle 



of foreign wars, selectmen and visit- 
ing officials, Five Department detach- 
ments, a "fraternal" division, educa- 
tional and national societies, Scouts 
and Guides and musing organizations. 



division 



made up entirely of 



anil a 

"Moats" The Winchester Post Land 
and sens of veterans ami British war 
veterans served as the Mayor and 
Mayoress's escort.] 

Following the parade at 6 p. m.. we 
were driven from the reviewing plat- 
form at full speed to Manchester 
Field, where the Aleppo Temple Band 



on it. ami also with a scroll to present 
to the Rotary Club. Winchester, Fng- 
lan I. I also received a lovely basket 
of flowers to take hack to the Mayor- 
ess with their cordial greetings. 

During this period Miss Downs was 
entertaining the Mayoress at lunch- 
. n at the Ladies' Club. At 2:30 Miss 
Downs took the Mayoress and myself 
to the Winchester Circle of the Flor- 
ence Crittenton Meeting, where hun 
dreds of guests awaited us. The pres- 
ident. Mrs. Harold Mayne. presented 
the Mayoress with a lovely silver vase, 
also with a bouquet of roses from her- 
self, ami another from tire members. 
I was asked to say a few words and 
when leaving we received the usual 
ovations. 

After tea attended meeting of the 
Winchester Post of the American Le- 
gion, there meeting Commander Park- 
hurst and many other officers of the 
Legion. After various speeches I was 
asked to speak, being introduced by 



Commander Parkhurst. It was a very- 
entertaining meeting, and at the close 
I was presented with a lovely silken 
flag of America, with staff surmounted 
by the golden eagle. During this peri- 
od the Mayoress was taken to a Bos- 
ton theatre. Not to bed very early- 
to-night! 

Friday 

9:30 a. m. — After breakfast we 
started by car for a coastal drive, 
which was most interesting. The 
scenes were delightful. After visiting 
many more places of interest we ar- 
rived at Marblehead, where We had a 
noted lunch, consisting of many sam- 
ples of shell fish, including clams. Fin- 
ished circular drive at 2:30. At 3:30 
a reception and tea was held at Miss 
Down's house, when hundreds of peo- 
ple came to greet us, all of whom had 
visited Winchester, England, previous- 
ly, judging by their conversation, but 
our city will probably see many more 
Americans in the future. Reception 
lasted till 6 p. ni., when we dressed 
anil accompanied our host and hostess, 
with other friends, to the Ritz-Carl- 
ton Hotel, Boston, for dinner, after 
which (having accepted the Mayor of 
Boston's invitation to attend their Ter- 
centenary Colonial Costume Ball) we, 
with Commander and Mrs. Parkhurst. 
and Capt. and Mrs. Hills, drove to the 
Boston Garden, where the Mayor's box 
was at our disposal. The Stadium 
there seats 20,000. We enjoyed the 
var ious parades of fancy dresses, also 
the Police and Fire Brigade bands, 
each numbering well over 1">() per- 
formers. After several announce- 
ments had been made — speeches by 
Russell ('oilman and Traffic Commis- 
sary J. A. Coury, it was announced 
that the Mayor of Winchester, Fng- 
land, was present, and I was asked to 
speak over the radio, but being at a 
very late hour I very much doubt if 
my voice was heard in my city. We 
wi r.' all loth to leave such a brilliant 
spectacle, but at 1 a. m. we made 
tracks for our hotel close by. 

Saturday 

Ritz-Carlton Hotel. — Rose ana took 
breakfast early. Picked up by car - 
Mrs. Chidley and Miss Downs who 
took us to see many interesting places 
in Boston, including a wonderful mu- 
seum, the gift of a prominent citizen. 
We were invited to the Siate House 
to meet Governor Allen, of Massachu- 
setts, who received us in a very kindly 
manner, and after a chat he arranged 
that a photograph be taken with him 
in his -tat.- room. He then presented 
me with a bronze tablet as a souvenir 
of the Tercentenary, and the Mayor- 
ess with a gold replica of the Com- 
monwealth Seal. We were then show n 
the original Charter of King Charles 
I which accompanied the Pilgrim 
Fathers in 1620, and we were present- 
ed with photographic reproductions, 
and a copy of the history of the old 
Boston State House signed by Gover- 
nor Allen. Our hostesses then took us 
to the Ritz-Carlton Hotel ofr early 
luncheon, and at 12:30 we were picked 
up by Selectman II. P. Richardson and 
others and motored to Harvard Col- 
ege Stadium, where we witnessed a 
grand march past of some 2,000 Army 
Cadets, and later saw the wonderful 
Rugby match between Harvard and 
Army. 75,(100 spectators were seated, 
and it was a very close and even 
match, the Army winning, (1 points to 
nil. My aide. Capt. C. Hills, escorted 
us with motor-cycle police officers, who 
cleared the traffic. We had a special 
pass to drive direct to the Stadium 
I) p. m. returned to hotel and spent a 
quiet evening writing letters and pack- 
ing. 

Sunday 

Morning. — Received many telephone 
inquiries from our W inchester, Mass., 
friends, many of whom made personal 
calls. From 11 o'clock onwards our 
rooms were like gardens of flowers, 
the gifts of our many friends. Com- 
mand* r Parkhurst an.l Capt. Hills 
lunched with us, with a special car 
for our luggage, straight on board to 
our state rooms on the "Laconia." 
Arriving on board, photographers and 
reporters were awaiting us. After be- 
ing photographed and interviewed we 
went to our state room, which we 
found packed with lovely baskets of 
flowers and many presents. Our Win- 
chester friends remained on board to 
the last moment and actually remained 
in a prominent position on the dock- 
head until we were out of sight, the 
time being about ." p. m. We then had 
a very busy time examining our many- 
presents. 

The Voyage 

The voyage out was by no means 
uneventful, for the Mayoress records 
that after leaving Liverpool at 1:30 
p. m. the "Laconia" ran into very 
heavy seas off Ireland. After taking 
on passengers at Queenstown and Gal- 
wav. rough weather was experienced 
till Wednesday. The heavy seas com- 
pelled the boat to be slowed down so 
much that she lost practically a whole 
day. which meant a late arrival at 
Boston, though some of time was 
made up. On Friday a whale was 
sighted. The Mayor and Mayoress took 
part in all the social activities during 
the voyage and in a bridge tournament 
we believe that his Worship won a 
consolation prize- a donkey— which 
caused much fun. The return voyage 
wa- less eventful, and the "Laconia" 
docked at Liverpool on Monday. Coun- 
cillor and Mrs. Collis spent a day vis- 
iting friends in the Liverpool district 
before returning to Winchester on 
Wednesday to keep official engage- 
ments on Thursday. — [Hampshire Ob- 
server. Winchester, England, Satur- 
day. Nov. 1, 1930. 



SALVATION ARMY GENERAL 
MAINTENANCE APPEAL 
FOR $2000 



RADIO RECEIVER PRODUCED BY 
EDISON LABORATORIES 



f 



The annual Salvation Army appeal 
for $2000 for Winchester is now in 
full swing. About $750 has now al- 
ready been given to this appeal. 

A Salvation Army solicitor with 
proper credentials will be canvassing 
the town in a few days, with a thor- 
ough house to house canvass; also 
contributions can be sent to Mr. 
Charles E. Barrett, Winchester Trust 
Company, Winchester. 

The many institutions that the 
Salvation Army serves the public as 
well as other means, is as follows: 

1. Evangeline rt.s.th Home for Girls. 

2. Day Nurseries. 

3. Free Employment liureaus. 

4. General Relief Work. 

5. Maternity Hospital. 

6. Mining Persons' Hureau. 

7. Kire ami Emergency Patrol. 
H. Werkingmens' Hotels. 
B. Christmas an.l Thankstrivinir Dinners. 

10. Itoys an.l Girls Organizations. 

11. Genera] Hospitals. 
1J. Dispensaries. 
IS. Fresh Air Camps. 
H. Americanization Bureau. 
15. Prison Department 
Also many other agencies by which 

this organization does it.> great and 
noble work. 

In past years the employees in our 
larg. r factories have been most gen- 
erous, but with the short hours dur- 
ing the past few months, we fear that 
their ability to help us will be seri- 
ou-ly affected. 

As a further result of this unem- 
ployment situation, many people 
have been out of work and their 
families are suffering and the Sal- 
vation Army has had many appeals 
for assistance in saving lives and has 
responded to these appeals. This 
condition has also called for unusual 
expenditures. 

Help us at this crucial moment, so 
that the Salvation Army may not 
turn down a case that comes to its 
doors. 

By the local Committee of 
this Winchester Salvation 
Army Appeal. 

BOOKS LOR CHRISTMAS GIFTS 

Winchester Public Library Suggests 
the Following for Younger 
Children 6-12 

Babbitt, C. (' .Tntnkn Tales. Short Table- 
au. 1 morals from the Orient 

[lullaril, Marion Enchanted Rntton. How 
a manic button wrought havoc in a kingdom. 

Emerson, Caroline I'. Mr. Nip and Mr. 
Tuck. A sett-going adventure. 

field. Rachel Hitty l Her First 100 Years. 
Received Newberry Prize Award for 1930. i 

.lame-, Winifred Adventure- of Louisa in 1 
Mexico. ' A Spanish doll iroe.- a traveling. 

Lofting, Hugh Twilight of Magic. A 
story of the middle ages in England. 

McElevcy. Eva I.. Pad an.l I. Gay i>oems 
fur and about children. 

Moon, Grace The Missing Katchinn. Vivid 
pictures of Indian life on lb- Southwestern 
mesa. , 

O'Neil. George- Tomorrows Mouse. A f 
charming phantasy of adventure. 

Patch, Edith M. Holiday Pond. Sketches 
of animal and plant life of a little pond. 

Pogany, Nnndor Magyar Fairy Tales. A 
hook of delightful Hungarian fairy tales. 

For Cirls 10-14 

Albert, Edna Little Pilgrim to Perm's 
W I. Adventures of a little maid in 1764. 

Alb. e. Marjorie H. Judith Lankester, 1' re- 
civil war days on a Quaker Farm. 

Burrows, Elizabeth Judy of the Whale 
Gales. An adventure story In the Aleutian , 
Islands. 

Campbell. Harriett H. - UimI Coats an.l lilue. 
Adventures of a loyalist in the American 
Hevolut ion. 

Crownfleld, Gertrude Freedom's Daughter. 
A romantic adventure of the Revolutionary 
War days 

Gray, Elizabeth J Meggy Macintosh. A I 
Scotch girl in the Carolines during the Rev- j 
elation. 

Lull, Margaret Y. — Golden River. A board- 
ing school story. 

Marble. Annie R, From Boston to Boston, i 
A story of Hannah an.l Richard Garrett In j 
Old England an.l New England in 1880. 

McNeely, M. II Jumping OIT Place. A 
horn.' story of the Dakota Prairies. 

Pease, Howard Gypsy Caravan. Adven- 
tures of Betty and Joe on the Romany Trail. 

Price, Edith B. Fork in the Road. 'I'm in 
heroine- an.l wholesome family life. 



For Hoys 10-1 I 

Best. Herbert Garram the Hunter. A (rood 
African story. 

Boy Scout Jamboree Book. 
Fulton, Reed Tede's Secret, 
adventure of Puget Sound. 

Kellev. Eric P Blacksmith 
stirring tale of Poland in 1882 
Lederer, Charlotte Stephen 
Adventures of a little king, 

Minot, John C Best Bird Stories I Know. 

My Life with Animals. 
The Scarlet of Avnlon. A 



The latest product of the Edison 
laboratories is the Edison !ight-o- 
matic radio, a distinctly new develop- 
ment in the field of radio. It is the 
result of continued research for great- 
er perfection in reproducing sound, 
since Edison invented the phonograph 
and bears the signature of Thomas A. 
Edison, the world famous inventor. 

The light-o-matic feature consists 
of an arrangement to facilitate sta- 
tion selection by means of a light 
Hashing through a miniature window 
when stations are picked up as the 
dial is turned. Of six models, two are 
screen grid with three others pre- 
senting the Edison neutrodyne cir- 
cuit. Another model is a combination 
Edison radio and electric phonograph. 

Attractive cabinet work lends 
charm and dignity to all of the models 
one or more of which are on display 
at the Edison district office, 546 Main 
street. Winchester. Each set is 
equipped with a built-in full dynamic 
type loud speaker. The sets are sold 
complete with tubes, installed, ready 
to use. Free antenna erection an.l 
free service over a six months' i eriod 
is included. 



Diaries at the Star Office. 

! — — 

Thomas Quigley, Jr. 

• Muster, Contractor an* Stone Mason 

PAVING, FLOORING. ROOF NG 
in Artificial Stone. Asphalt 
and All Concrete Product* 
«M>wtlki, Drivrwsys. Curbing. Steps. Etc 
Floor* for Cellar*. Stable*. Factories 
and Warehouse* 
Estimates Furnished 

18 LAKE STREET 



NOTARY PUBLIC 
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE 

T. PRICE WILSON 

Star Office 



The Home Worker 

Oosh, have you ever stopped to 
think what electricity does In the 
home? It runs tin.' washer, heats the 
iron, turns the funs, toasts the bread, 
cooks the meal, perks the coffee, curls 
the hair, tuns the radio, warms the 
bath water, sweeps the carpets, runs 
the sewing machine and lights the 
house. Truly Aladdin's lamp Is not 
a myth. — Florida Times-Cnton. 



Good's 
Riding School 

Harry Good, Prop. 

WM Broken Horses 
and Ponies 

Personal Supervision 

MAIN STREET MEDFORD 

(Near Oak C.rove CcnieUry i 

Tel. Mystic 3802 

*1T tt 



COKE 

$12.00 PER TON 

Stove, Nut and Egg sizes. 
Extra charge for smaller 
quantities. All orders cash. 

FRIZZELL BROS. 

Tel. Woburn 0570 
6 Greenwood Avenue 




Give your nil »th.r 
friend or sweet- 
heart a guaran- 
teed, sweet sing, 
ing canary bird 
We have Harts 

Mountain lingers, 
I. .ue. genuine so- 

leete.i St. Andreas- 

burs with long silvery trills no. I grand 
variations, day and night songsters, $0.00. 
Als.. cages of all descriptions eat. doe ami 
bird supplies, etc. 



CHAS. LUDLAM 

'.ii Bromfleld St. and 20 Bosworth St. 
Tel. Utterly 9369 Boston 
Established Isth 

ol0-13t 



Evening EXCURSION l ares 

lO O S» T O IV 

ROUND 32c TRIP 

Tickets good weekday evening! only, on 
trains from Winchester arriving at 
Huston ti P. M. or later: returning 
leaving lloston the name evening nut 
later than midnight. 

EVENING EXCURSION TICKETS 
also on sale to Motion and return from 

Woburn toe 

BUY TICKETS IIEFOKE BOAKDIN'C 
TRAINS 
Tirkets on sale in advance 

BOSTON AND MAINE R. li. 



E. W. NICHOLSON 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 

We're equipped to handle any 
kind of a plumbing job, big ir 
small, the public has to offer. 
We do our work well and wo do 
it in jiir time, too. No waiting 
around for inspiration. We will 
do your repair work in a hurry 
and you'll be perfectly willing 
to meet the sort of a bill we'll 
hand you. 

118 WINN STREET, WOBURN 
Tel. Woburn 0K!I9 




T. F. Kennefick 

Roofing and Metal Work 
of All Kinds 

Office at A. Miles Holbrook's 
24 CHURCH STREET TEL. WIN. 1250 



fu-tf 



Mystery 
of Vilno. 
the Valiant 



A 



Mor se. George F 
Selvees, Karl It. 
basketball story. 

Walk. r. Joseph - How They Carried the 
Mail. Mail transnortation from 30. .0 1$. C. ! 
to Aeroplane service. 

Yates. Koliert I.. -When I Was a Harvester. 
A tale of the harvesting fields of the Canadian 
Northwest. 



MONDAY MORN 



By Jeanne Phelps and Cynthia Corthell 

Monday morn at the break of dawn. 
We spread the clothes upon the lawn, 
We wipe the dishes, we make the beds, 
We .-et the tahle. we wash the spreads. 
We feed the chickens that run like the dickens. 
We water the hens in their dinky pens. 
We cut the grass, we mow the lawn, 
We weed the irardrn and hoe the corn. 
We groom our horses anil wive them j. r rain. 
We soap each saddle, each bridle, each rein. 
And while we are working we whistle a tunc. 
It may not seem true, but we finish by noon. 
And from morn until nis'ht and from day to 
day. 

We ha\ ir work an.l we have our play. 

I Clipped from "The Trail Maker," written 
by two Winchester Girl Scouts, aged 1- an.l 
la respectively.) 



YOUR RIAJMO 

The joy of ownership of your piano means a lot to you, the 
maintaminK of a musical rendition for best results means attention 
serviced reirularlj. Many a Rood piano has Ix-en ruined by neglect! 

To «et all that the maker put into your piano means a small 
investment for big musical dividends. 

A yearly contract for two to four tunings can lie made at a 
reasonable price. 

WILLIAM E. CILESKI 

EXPERT PIANO TUNER 
20 years' experience with Henry F. Miller and fllaanit anb *umlin 
TEL. WOBURN 1223-M 

n21-2t» 




^CALE RADIATOR FURNITURE £J 



Super Agriculturist 

All farmer" study crop production, 
hut n iiiiin who specinlb.es In Hi" 
brunch of agriculture that deals with 
theory and practice "f crop production 
is called it i \ agronomist. 



r— ' 




THK FINISHING TOUCH 

A home with uncovered radiators 
cannot |.»,k well. CALE Metal Radi- 
ator Furniture wives the finishing 
touch which stalls perfection. 
Cover your radiators now and enjoy 
their beauty all year round. During 
the winter they will make your home, 
easier to keep clean, and the attached 
humidifiers will air..rd far greater 
comfort and health. 
Many handsome period designs and 
colorings, to match your decorations 
at reasonable prices. 

Estimates cheerfully furnished 
CALE MET A I. PRODUCTS CO. 
2S0 Stuart St. Boston, Mans. 

Hanrark 0M3 



Tlfin ■ '-.■rT.'V'*''" *~~" r e~ , rT*-.rTp- * 'TTT" 

IHHlllil liilr;. o.,' '.;!.!::. Jlllaiiijjljiilill'uil 



BUILDING PERMITS GRANTED 

The Building Commissioner has is- 
sued the following permits f">' week 
ending Thursday, Nov. 'Jn: 

Wm. -T. Thwing, Winchester— alter- 
ations to dwelling also add private 
garage in basement of present dwell- 
ing at 11 Lloyd street. 

Lindsay Foster of Medford — new 
dwelling and garage at 8 Chesterford 
road east. 

Hose Mary Captucci, North Wo- 
burn— alter former church building 
into dwelling at 26 Cross street. 

John Hatfield. Arlington — new- 
dwelling and private garage on lot 
at 6 Francis circuit. 




Seventy-two sheets of parchment 
paper and 50 envelopes to match, 69c 
at the Star Office. 



The only Potato Chip 
which can be served 
with entire Satisfaction 
in the home 



fe=' 



POTATO 
CHIPS 



M/..TC BV 

NEWTON >UR£ FOOD CO. 



They are not only 

Delicious, — 
'They or.- the Be$f 
Try Them 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1930 



.5 




en 



lllll§liilllll!ll|lii:il| 



r-VV! > r-m-r-. , , t— . 

':;.ul.iu..;i;ui;.!H':l(,.,."..i^..^„„ 



Holiday Season 

Clark Jewel Range Sale 



I 



v ■ 



$10 

Allowance 
for your 
Old Range 



Many Colors and 
Models to Choose 
from 




$10 

first payment 

Balance in 17 
equal monthly 
payments 



a 



All ranges equipped with 
Loraine Oven Heat Con- 
trol and Insulated Oven 



Arlington Gas Light Co. 

. Win. 0142 527 Main Street, Winchester 



liililiiiilj] 



UNIVERSITY THEATRE 



MALDEN MYSTIC THEATRE 



GRANADA ATTRACTIONS 



"Moby Dick" starring John Bar- 
rymore comes t<> the University 
Theatre next Sunday for four days. 
Based mi I he famous novel of the 
same name by Herman Melville, the 
story of mad Captain Ahab and his 
long hunt lor the great white whale, 
i> the most spectacular drama ever 
transferred to the talking screen. 
The most difficult voice-recording 
<ver attempted, taken during a 
furious storm at sea while the whal- 
ing ship, rebuilt for the purpose, was 
being tossed about in almost helpless 
fashion, heard in this version of 
".Moby Dick." .loan Bennett plays 
the feminine lead opposite the star 
ami Lloyd Hughes, Noble .Johnson, 
Walter Long and .lack Curtis are in 
the cast. 

Laughs will be plentiful when Bert 
Wheeler and Robert Whoolsey, favo- 
rite film comedy team, are seen in 
their latest production, "Half Shot 
sit Sunrise" the companion feature. 
This show, a wartime comedy, is 
said to be one of the most amusing 
features of the year. 

"The Spoilers," the Hex Beach 
story starts Thursday for three days. 
Gary Cooper is featured at the head 
of an important east, the supporting 
players including Kay Johnson, Het- 
ty Compson, Harry Green, William 
Boyd, Slim Somerville and James 
Kirkwood. 

"Maybe It's Love," a comedy ro- 
mance' of college days, with a cast 
headed hv Joan Bennett, Joe E, 
Brown and James Hall is the com- 
panion feature. A fast-moving story 
of campus life it presents one of the 
most authentic pictures of under- 
graduate days. Miss Bennett por- 
travs a lovely collegiate belle who 
succeeds in gathering an all-Ameri- 
can football team to fight on the 
gridiron for her Alma Mater. Joe 
E. Brown has the funniest role of his 
career as a "has been" football star 
pushed into the background by the 
arrival of the "all-Americans." James 
Hall has the role of a pigskin star 
opposite Miss Bennett in the lead- 
ing male role. Laura Lee provides 
many amusing moments as the cam- 
pus cutie ami sweetheart of Brown. 



"Hilly the Kid," with John Mack 
Brown, and "Scotland Yard," in 
which Edmund Lowe and Joan Ben- 
nett enact the leading roles, will be 
the special program the Mystic Thea- 
tre in .Maiden will offer for seven 

days starting Saturday. "Hilly the 
Kid," before his death at the age of 
21, gained the reputation of being 
the West's most dangerous num. 
John Mack Brown is a line selection 

for the role of the "kid." Kay John- 
son supplies the romance. Wallace 
Beery an excellent performance as 
the sheriff, while Karl Dane is seen 
to advantage as a funny Swedish 
cowboy. 

"Scotland Yard," the second attrac- 
tion on the Mystic program which 
starts mi Saturday, is the intensely 
human stmy of an underworld char- 
acter who attempts to resume his 
place in decent society. Through the 
mistake of a plastic surgeon who re- 
builds his face after it has been 
mangled in battle. Barroles, the 
criminal, is made to appear exactly 
like, Sir John Lasher, English noble- 
man. He returns to England and is 
taken in as the English lord, fooling 
even the hitter's wife who was sepa- 
rated from her husband on the day 
of their wedding. Edmund Lowe per- 
forms the dual role in tine style, 
while Joan Bennett is well cast as 
the wife. — 

"Outside the Law," a thrillinw 
crook drama, with Mary Nolan and 
Owen Moore as the stars, is the main 
attraction on the Mystic program 
which concludes its run on Friday. 
"Shadow Ranch," is the second at- 
traction on the current program. 



"The Playboy of Paris," starring 
popular Maurice Chevalier, and "Her 
Man," with Helen Twelvetrees head- 
ing the cast, will make up the dou- 
ble feature program the big Granada 
Theater in Maiden will offer for sev- 
en clays starting Saturday. Maurice 
Chevalier, is cast as a millionaire 
waiter in "The Playboy of Paris." 
All day long he waits on the rich peo- 
ple of Paris, longing to take his place 
witii them in the glamorous life of 
the world's fashion center. At night, 
transformed, he joins the throng of 
merry-makers in the brilliant cafes, 
ami. with his bewitching singing, his 
melting love-making, becomes a fav- 
orite with all the women. His chief 
difficulty is in keeping his identity 
as a waiter secret, for he is under 
contract to continue waiting on 
tables for 20 years. "Her Man," a 
picture that has won high praise 
from critics all over the country is a 
tremendous story of the slums of 
Havana and the regeneration of a 
young woman through the power of 
love with Miss Twelvetrees giving a 
remarkable portrayal as Frankie. The 
girl, Frankie, is a dance hall habitue, 
who until she meets "her man" is the 
pliant tool of "Johnnie" a rascally 
knife-throwing bounder who is por- 
trayed by Ricardo Cortez. "Dan" a 
sailor who salvages the soul of 
"Frankie" and wins her love is artis- 
tically presented by Phillips Holmes. 

"Heads Up," starring Charles 
i Buddy ) Rogers, is the main attrac- 
tion on the program which concludes 
its run at the Granada on Friday. 



WINCHESTER GIRLS HOST HOCK- 
EY CROWN TO ARLINGTON 



I he summary : 

ARLINGTON 
CartuUo, Iw 



Snow Huts Warm 

Eskimo huts are made of snow, and 
as Ions us there Is n supply of blubber 
to till six or eight lamps, the place Is 
so warm that the children go about 
naked. 



Clifton McNeil and James Haley 
returned home on Wednesday for the 
Thanksgiving holidays from New 
Hampton 



Deadly Fighting Weapon 

A bowie knife is one with a strons 
blade from in to IS inches long, a sin- 
gle edge, with its back straight 
throughout most of its length and then 
curved coneavoly to the point, to which 
the edge curves convexly. 



MBajtnHiwimnniimiiiiiiiniHHMiMM^ 

Tip Tables and Plant Stands 

SOLID MAHOGANY AND MAPLE 

Attractively Priced at $5.00 to $9.00 

THE WINDSOR SHOP 

530 Main Street 



WINCHESTER LADIES SPONSOR 
SALE 

Mrs. A. J. Boyden, Mrs. Charles A. 
Burnham, Mrs. Dunbar F. Carpenter. 
Mrs. Howard J. Chidley, Mrs. Albert 
K. Comins, Miss Elizabeth Downs, 
Mrs. Douglas N. Graves, Mrs. George 
E. Henry, Mrs. John H. Joy. Mrs. 
Henry J. Kellogg. Mrs. Frederick 
Kerr, Mrs. Wm. A. Lefavour, Mrs. 
James B. Lord, Mrs. James Nowell. 
Mrs. William I. Palmer, Mrs. George 
Hale Reed. Mrs. Isaac E. Sexton. Mrs. 
Frederic S. Snyder, Mrs. Louis K. 
Snyder, Mrs. Bowen Tufts. Mrs. Her- 
bert S. Underwood, Mrs. Clarence P. 
Whorf are patronesses for a sale of 
Belgian, Bulgarian, Chinese, Cyprus. 
Greek, Italian, Moroccan, Russian 
and Turkish distinctive hand work at 
the residence of Mrs. Albert K. Co- 
mins, Highland avenue on Tuesday, 
Dec. 2 from 10 a. m. to 6 p. m. 



A GIFT SHOP FOR CHRISTMAS 
CARDS— WRAPPINGS— BOOKS 
and 

WHITING COOK'S STATIONERY 
i.:a[:iiiii!tiiiioiui:iiiiiouiiiiiiiiiniiiiii 



American State PoeU 

While the office of poet laureate in 
England is largely an honorary one, 
there is a small salary attached to 
It, amounting at present to about 
$40", a year. Formerly it was $.%«> a 
year, plus a ensk of wine. Some of 
the states of this country, such as 
Nebraska. Oklahoma, etc., have ap- 
pointed state poets or poets laureate, 
usually purely honorary positions. 



Arlington High School girls' field 
hockey team won the Greater Boston 
Interscholastic championship Mon- 
day afternoon when it defeated the 
Winchester High team at Concord, 
1—0. Winchester replaced Melrose 
in the final when it was discovered 
Monday morning that ('apt. Elizabeth 
Davidson of that school had been un- 
knowingly ineligible all season be- 
cause of failure to fulfill certain 
specific Melrose scholastic require- 
ments. 

As the score would indicate Mon- 
day's match was a close one, but Ar- 
lington's better teaming on the for- 
ward line gave it the edge. The lo- 
cals played a better game than that 
of the previous Friday against Mel- 
rose, and during much of the first 
half had the ball in Arlington's terri- 
tory. 

Winchester had several good scor- 
ing chances and only some fine de- 
fensive work on the part of the Ar- 
lington goaler prevented Coach Cen- 

: tervall's charges from tallying. 

"Kayo" Keepers, guarding the Win- 
chester net during the first half, also 
turned in a couple of fine stops, once 
kicking out a shot which seemed al- 

, most certain to evade her. 

After the half Arlington forged 

I to the front by virtue of its superior 
team work, and soon had Winchester 

I almost entirely on the defensive. 

! What few offensive spurts the locals 

i made were due almost entirely to the 

\ individual ability of Janet Nichols, 
and as was the case in the Melrose 

1 came, the remainder of the club 
seemed to depend upon her to do the 
scoring. 

Arlington with its superior pass 
work kept continually working the 
ball up the field, and only some 
strong defensive playing by ('apt. 
Carolyn Nichols, Mabel Thompkins, 
Loretta Carleton and Jean King held 
the Spy Ponders in check. 

Finally midway through the half 
the ball was taken into a brisk scrim- 
mage in the striking circle in front 
of the Winchester sticks and a hard 
shot was taken at goaler "Joe" Fowle. 
The latter stopped the shot, but fol- 
lowed the ball out of the goal to make 
the clear. As she did so. Capt. Bar- 
bara Carr of Arlington took the re- 
bound and rolled it into the goal. It 
was not a hard shot, and had coaler 
Fowle been in her usual position, it 
would have been an easy one to save. 

It proved however, to be the win- 
ning tally, for though Winchester 
kept trying, its individual game pot 
nowhere against the combination play 
of the Arlington girls who were win- 
nine their third title in eight years. 

Winchester was disappointed in its 
failure to wn, but the loss of the title 
was considerably tempered by the 
knowledge that Melrose really de- 
served the shot at the big crown. The 
local girls reacted to the situation like 
good sportswomen and while welcom- 
ing the chance to play for the cham- 
pionship were heartily sorry for the 
Melrose girls' hard luck. 



Scanned, ii 

Carr, of 

Donnelly, ri 

O'Sullivun, rw 

< hapmun, 1M> 

Hart; chb 

Kane, Ihb 

Uuviu, rfl) 

M. I„owcock, Ifb 

I*.. Liowcock, n 

Score- Arlington 1. 
Mi -. i ran Barry. 



WINCHESTER 
. . . rw, Williams 
rw, Abbott 
. . . . ri, Kendrick 

cf, Poland 

Ii. Little 

, .Iw, J. Nichols 
.rlil). Thompkins 
. . .chb, t .ti l, ton 



rhb, C. Nichols 

li'li. Kins 

Ifb, Thompson 

rfb, Shaw 

g, Keepers 

K, r'owle 
Goiil -Carr. Umpire - 



WINCHESTER HOY HAS FINE 
FOOTBALL SOUVENIR 



"Hilly" McDonald, s f Mr. and 

Mrs. William E. McDonald, Jr. of 
Hill street, is the proud possessor of 
a football souvenir any fan in the 
East might well envy. 

As a member of the Noonan School 
football team, "Hilly" has the nor- 
mal boy's interest in the gridiron 
game, and so it was with real delight 
that he received this week a football, 
I autographed by 10 members of the 
big Green varsity team ami coach- 
ing staff at Dartmouth. The foot- 
: ball is the gift of "Joe" Tansey, form- 
| er captain and star tackle of the Nor- 
| wich University eleven, and this year 
| coach of the Clark School team at 
Hanover, N. H. 



ENGLISH CLASS HAD THANKS- 
GIVING PARTY 

Because of thi' Thanksgiving holi- 
days, Mr. Robert M. Keeney, English 
instructor at high school and his class 
staged a most enjoyable party Wed- 
nesday morning. Miss Olive Boutillier 
had charge <d' the entertainment anil 
Miss Harriet Keepers took care of the 
refreshments. Norman Hill, the mas- 
ter of ceremonies, acted his part very 
well and introduced the various par- 
ticipants in the program cleverly. 

Robert l.ampee gave a very drama- 
tic address as a potential candidate 
for the position of dog catcher in 
Winchester while his rival for the 
honor, Clifford O'Brien, opposed him 
very effectively. Jean King drew 
caricatures of every one in the class 
tluit weii' very amusing. Elizabeth 
Mead played a medley of college 
songs and Norman Hill and "Kay" 
Chamberlin played a duet while Rob- 
ert l.ampee played the trumpet. 
Grace Dunne, to end the entertain- 
ment, did a very clever tap dance. 



Publicity Man's Power 

Jud Tuuklns says a live publicity 
man, If he works In Hie right part of 
the world, can fret a typewriter and a 
camera and make a street fight look 
like a revolution.— Washington star. 



Want A Better Home ? 

Visit the new brick end Colonial at 16 Sheffield road, 
Winchester. 9 rooms, 2 fireplaces, 4 baths, 2 car garage, 
18,000 feet of land, slate roof, insulated. Easy terms. 
Might trade. 

PHONE OWNER— PROSPECT 1680 



Announcement 

In response to repeated questions, I wish to announce 
that my establishment is still open for business at its 
original location, 15 Thompson Street. 

For the same expert service 

PHONE WINCHESTER 1766 

R. E. BELIVEAU 

Upholsterer 



Successor to A. E. Bergtrom 



n28-2t 



6 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1930 



The Winchester Star 

THEODORE P. WILSON. Editor and 
Publisher: WINCHESTER, MASS. 

SINGLE COPIES. SEVEN CENTS 
Left at Your Residence for One Year 
The Winchester Star. 82.50, in advance 

News Items, Lodge Meetings, Society 
Events, Personals, etc., sent to this 
office will be w elcomed by the Editor 

Kntrrrd at the poatoHire at Winchester, 
HlM rhuattta, aa atrond-clau matter. 

TELEPHONE NUMBER 0020 

The Star is sorry that it can not 
sec eye t<» eye with those whose mis- 
guided idea "of a good time le<l them 
to smear the Woburi) High School goal 
posts with Winchester colors some 
time previous to the holiday game. 
We do not believe any hiirh school 
pupils were responsible for the job 
which was anything but sportsman- 
like. It is to be hoped that the Wo- 
burn supporters will on their part be 
sportsmen enough to ignore the whole 
business. 



The 



present "business depression" 
should provide an opportunity to re- 
vise some of the labor laws of this 
State. When parents of boys 16 and 
16 years of age, who are receiving 
town aid, desire to have their boys at 
work to aid in the family income and 
to keep them off the street, it would 
appear that the present laws prose- 
cuting employ* rs of these boys should 
be amended. A boy between 15 and 
20, who desires to work and whose 
family needs his assistance, should be 
allowed to do so. It is an absurd sit- 
uation when a boy "f this age is con- 
fronted by the knowledge that he is 
not allowed to w irk and is to look to 
the community to support him. 



Ifr" 



Some meaning in that often 
times tragic word. 



You 



may profit by the experi- 
ence of others. 



If? 



WILLIAM W. HILL, Agent 

The Northwestern Mutual 
Life Insurance Company 

235 Park Square Building 
Boston 

Phone Hancock 3765— Win. 0418 



W OBl'RN WON FROM 
WINCHESTER 

Intercepted Pass and Field Goal 
Victors' Winning Edge 



MRS. MA KM. LA J. ARMSTRONG 

Mrs. Manila Jane Armstrong, for 
57 years a resident of this town and 
the' widow of the late Robert M. 
Armstrong, win, was prominently 
identified with V. M. C. A. work 
throughout the state, died at her 
home 121 Highland avenue mi Wed- 
nesday noon. She was 72 years of 

Mrs. Armstrong was a native of 
Vassalboro, Me. and the daughter of 
Benjamin and Elizabeth Weeks. She 
came to Winchester with her parents 
when a young girl, attended the local 
high school and was married here. 
Her husband died live years ago. She 
leaves six children— Mrs. Arthur 
IVabodv Pratt of Greenfield, Robert 
W., Russell 1!. and Dorothy of this 
town, l'\ Douglass of Head) Bluff and 
Mrs. Clement C. Rinehart of New 
York City. Twelve grandchildren 
also survive her. She was widely 
known among the elder residents of 
the town and was an early member 
of the Methodist Church. While her 
hi alth had not be< n of the best dur- 
ing recent years, her sudden death 
was most unexpected and a great 
shock i" her family and friends. 

The funeral services are to be held 
on Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, 
at the Crawford Memorial Church. 
Rev. J. West Thompson, pastor of 
the church, officiating. The inter- 
ment will be .n tin family lot in 
V'ildwoud Cemetery. 




MISS VIRGINIA WARREN 
VIRGINIA WARREN IN CONCERT 



APPRECIATION TO CITIZENS OF 
WINCHESTER 

The Guildhall, 
Winchester 
Nov. 6, 1930 

Harry Stevens, Esq.. 

Chairman of Selectmen, 
Town Hall. 

Winchester, Mass., U. S. A. 
Hear Sir: 

At a meeting of the Town Council 
of Hie City of Winchester held today, 
the Right Worshipful The Mayor re- 
ported that on his visit to Winchester, 
Mass., ('. s. A., to take part in your 
recent Tercentenary Celebrations, the 
Board of Selectmen, on behalf of the 
citizen- of Winchester. Mass.. handed 
t.i him for presentation to the citizens 
of Winchester, England, a replica in 
silver of the original Paul Revere 
Bowl, held an I greatly prized by you; 
when it was: 

R ESO LV E D UNANIMOUSLY 
"That the said bowl be gratefully ac- 
cepted by the Council and kept with 
the corporation plate in the Muniment 
Room, and that the Town Clerk do 
convey to the citi/.ens of Winchester. 
Mass.". the Council's dee]) appreciation 
of their generous gift, and for the 
cordial reception and hospitality at- 
forded to the Mayor and Mayoress 
during their visit." 

Yours faithfully. 

(Signed) Thomas Holt. 

Town Clerk 



A year age a young American ar- 
tist, born under the shadow of the 
gilded dome of our State House, broke 
into the vision of music lovers with a 
perfect recital. Without the usual 
blare of trumpets that so often ac- 
company the announcement of an ar- 
tist returned from musical studies 
abroad., Virginia Warren appeared on 
the stage of oJrdan Hall last January 
and before an audience of music lov- 
ers, which included almost all the crit- 
ic- of Boston, presented one of the 
most interesting recital programs 
heard in a long time. 

Warren Storey Smith of the Boston 
Post stated that she was "a born re- 
cital sinner"; adding also that she pos- 
sesses that "rare, yet indispensable, 
attribute of the recital singer; a sense 
of style. To lapse into the vernacular, 
by way of comprehensive summary. 
Miss Warren can 'put a song across'." 

The Boston Transcript stated "Shi' 
does more than merely reverse the 
usual procedure of the musician who is 
just beginning a career and who 
places certain superficialities of vocal 
technique first and real musical in- 
telligence last. Miss Warren not only 
places musical intelligence first but 
brings to bear a thorough technical 
training. She possesses a naturally 
tine rhythmic sense. She makes her- 
self familiar with the music at hand, 
discovers its intellectual as well as 
emotional qualities, finis just the 
right tempo for it. observes its pecu- 
liarities of accent and phrase, and 
above all endeavors to project some- 
thing of its essential character." 

Other critics and newspapers com- 
mented unon Miss Warren's talents 
with equal approval and. needless to 
say, her American debut was hailed 
on all sides as a splendid musical 
triumph. 

Following the laying of a fine musi- 
cal background here in American, with 
further study abroad, where she tilled 
extensive concert engagements, she 
returned to Boston where she was ac- 
claimed as possessing a voice of fine 
quality and exquisite purity and 
warmth, added to which she has a 
pleasing presence, a sense of style 
and accurate enunciation. 

Miss Warren, who makes her home 
with her parents, Mr. ami Mrs. Clar- 
ence A. Warren of Everett avenue, 
appears in concert a^ain in Jordan 
Hall. Boston, on Wednesday evening. 
Pec. 10. and a large number of mus'c 
lovers of Winchester will undoubtedly 
be seen in the audience. 



WINCHESTER MAN RECEIVED 
PAST GRAND'S JEWEL 

Mr. Arthur W. Razee of Washing- 
ton street was honored last Sunday 
when 12 members of Khil- David 
Lodge, 1. 0. <>■ F., of Franklin, gath- 
ered at his home to present him with 
a handsome Past Grand's Jewel, in 
honor of his 50 years' membership in 
that organization. Mrs. Albert il. 
Razee served a delicious buffet lunch- 
con after which an entertainment was 
t njoyed. 



M. C. W. G. NOTES 

Much favorable comment is being 
received by the local branch on the 
part it had in last Sunday's concert 
at the Holy Ghost Hospital. Joseph 
W. Mahoney of Woburn. himself an 
exceptional entertainer, sponsored the 
"Winchester" numbers which in- 
cluded singing, comedianism and 
readings. The various branches in 
the Diocese contributed to the same 

program. 

No soc ; al meeting was held this 
month on accout of the holiday. The 
next business moetine: will be Dec. 11. 



JORDAN HALL BOSTON 

Wednesday Evening. December ICth at 8:15 
SONG RECITAL 



b> 



Virginia Warren 

Soprano 

BERNARD ZIGHERA. Accompanist 



Marsh 



Tickets $2.00, $1.50, $1.00 and 50 cents. On sale at Jor 
Co, (Travel Bureau. Street Floor) and Jordan Hall Box Offic 
Management: A. H. Handley, 162 Boylston Street. Boston, Mas 



r>28-2t 



An intercepted forward pass which 
Capt. Paul Flaherty converted into a j 
touchdown and a pretty field goal by j 
"Bob" Foley gave Woburn High a I 
9 — 0 victory over Winchester in the | 
annual Thank>giving Hay classic be- 
tween the two schools yesterday 
morning at Woburn. A huge crowd 
viewed the struggle which was on the 
whole evenly contested. Winchester 
held the upper hand during much of 
the first half, but toward the end of 
the game Woburn was in the drivers' 
seat and kept the ball for the most 
part in the locals' territory. 

As the crowd treked down to the 
gridiron the most noticeable things 
to be seem were the goal posts which 
some hardy souls had painted in Red 
and Black with the word "Winches- 
ter" emblazened on the cross bars. A 
workman between the halves slob- 
bered yellow paint onto one of the 
goals, but the other stood as the Win- 
chester enthusiasts had li ft il. It was 
just too bad that the football team 
couldn't have lived up to its advance 
press agenting. 

Both camps had big cheering sec- 
tions, and it seemed that there were 
more Winchester supporters at the 
game than Woburn sympathisers. 
Coach Mansfield's charges started 
well and looked good to win handily 
during the first few minutes of play. 
As the game progressed the locals 
seemed to lose their drive while Wo- 
burn hustled and took advantage of 
every break which presented itself. 

Winchester's offensive scheme of 
things was pretty much an open book 
to the Woburn boys for it never var- 
ied from the opening to the closing 
whistle. .First an off-tackle run from 
kick formation, then a try at center, 
whii either a pass or kick on third 
j down. The locals didn't make In 
yards all morning through the cen- 
ter of the Woburn line, yet the quar- 
terbacks kept plugging away and in- 
variably lost the advantage they were 
gaining off the tackles and through 
the air. 

Woburn's offense also never varied. 
The Tanners used a cross-buck, a run 
on the long side of the line and oc- 
casionally a cut back. The success of 
its running game depended entirely 
upon the individual ability of Flaher- 
ty and Foley who ran hard and fast, 
holding their feet well when hit. 

Winchester failed to make the 
most of the passing game with which 
it is equipped. Woburn's pass de- 
fense looked feeble enough, and time 
and again long "Eddie" Hitchborn 
was free and clear out in the open 
only to have the passer shoot the 

; leather into a clump of black and 
orange jersies. Hitchborn completed 
one of the two long passes shot to 
him. and lost the other with a clear 
way for a touchdown when his feet 
went out from under him just as he 
was going to clutch the ball. 

Woburn didn't gamble much on 
passing, preferring to kick; and its 
Paul Flaherty did some mighty ef- 
fective booting id' the pigskin. The 
Tanners invariably gained on kicks, 
Leo being so hurried by the Woburn 
forwards that he seldom got either 
hcighth or distance. 

The Winchester line just wasn't 
cleaning out eonsistantly though there 
were times when the whole left side 
ef the Tanners' line was ridden right 
out of the picture. On those occasions 
the play invariably was on the other 
side where Woburn was especially 
strong. Only Captain Emery, DiMin- 
ico and "Dan" Smith played ball on 
the rushline. "Piggie" Knowlton and 
"Olio" l.ee bore the brunt of the hall 
carrying for the locals and the form- 
er played a corking all around game, 
Wilme'r Smith played the consistent- 
ly good football he has shown all 
season, though the helmet, he was 
wearing made his passing less effec- 

1 tive than it has been. 

At the start of the game Winches- 
ter had its hie chance when play was 
entirely in Woburn territory. Follow- 
ing the kickoff and after Hiekey had 
prevented Flaherty from breaking 
away for a score by a bruising last 
ditch tackle, both teams were pen- 
alized for offside. Knowlton kicked 
to the Woburn 12-yard line where a 
fumble was recovered by DiMinico 
for a real break. 

| Hiekey got 5 yards on a criss cross 

j hut th"" inevitable thrust at center 
failed to gain. Knowlton got 2 yards 

j at tackle, but another plunge into th? 
massed center of the Woburn line 

; failed to gain and Woburn took the 

, ball at its 3 -yard line. 

Play remained in Woburn territory 

, throughout the quarter and continued 
pretty much on that side of midfield 

I until just before the half when Wil- 

! mer Smith dropped back to pass from 
his own 40-yard line. He was hur- 
ried by several Woburn men, but des- 
perately hurled off the pass which 
went into the hands of Captain 
Flaherty of Woburn who galloped 
straight down the sidelines, 50 long 
yards for a touchdown. Foley failed 

j to kick the goal. 

Just before the close of the third 

' quarter Lee and Knowlton reeled off 
a first down on Winchester's 40-yard 
line. Lee then crashed through the 
whole Woburn team for l-"> yards, and 
it seemed that Winchester had started 
at last. 

A costly offside penalty stalled 
Winchester's (ffetise and Woburn in- 
tercepted a pass at its own 40-yard 
line. Then Knowlton broke through 
to smear Quigley for a 5-yard loss 
with the game's best tackle and Wo- 
burn kicked outs.de at the 42-yard 
line. 

(>nc« again an offside penalty 
slowed up the locals and Woburn 
broke up a poorly played lateral to 
take the ball at Winchester's 30-yard 
line. From then until the end of the 
game the Tanners held the upper 
band. Flaherty kicked twice, driving 
Winchester back on the exchange from 
its 2ii to its 10 yard line. 

Loo dropped back to punt, but 
fumbled and recovered the ball on 
his own 1-yard line. His kick from 
behind the goal line carried only to 
the 18-yard marker, and after Flaher- 
ty bad picked up 8 yards in three 



Winchester 

NATIONAL 

Bank 



Notice to Members of Our 
Christmas Club 



••3 



i 



ALL PAYMENTS FOR PRESENT MEMBERS MUST BE MADE ON OR BEFORE 
NOVEMBER 29th. 



BOOKS WILL CLOSE ON THAT DATE. 

CHECKS WILL BE MAILED TO MEMBERS OF OUR 1930 CLUB ON DECEM- 
BER 3rd. 

BOOKS ARE NOW READY FOR OUR 1931 CLUBS. WE ARE OPEN SATUR- 
DAY EVENINGS FROM 7 TO 8:30. 



xui i^iAiw ml Aiiz iiiu wityvtftf? 



The locals tried desperately to score 
through the air, but without avail. 
Just before the final whistle, Lund- 
blad and "Dan" Smith were sent from 
the game for too free use of their 
hands in a scrimmage. 

The summary: 

WOUUJtN 

McDonald, le 

C, Foley, le 

Altuvustu, li 

PeUenidictus, Ig. , , 

Johnson, c 

Ayhvuru, d 

i uttuoJJy, c 

1 1. May.., rt; 

Moranai, rg 

Oenurbti rt 

Lombard, rt 

Caunuy, re 

Colucci, re 
MvDoiiough, >il>. . . . 

It. Quigley, Ihb..., 

It. Foley, Ihb 

C. yuiidi y, rhb. . . . 
Sheerin. rhb 

Flaherty, fb 

Score Woburn 
Field goal it. 
Umpire Lombard, 



WINCHESTER 

re, Hitchborn 

re, M.ibli* 

rt, Emery 

rt, Proeu|iio 

rg, l). Smith 

iv. SymmuH 

c, Ambrose 

c, Ifimery 

Ilf. Colpus 

Ig, Flaherty 

It. Flaherty 

It. fernery 

le, DIMinicu 

b. Hiekey 

lib, Toi'uri 

rhb, Lundblad 

rhb, Leo 

Ihb, W. Smith 

ihb, Lundblad 

Ihb, TarQuinie 

lb, Knowlton 

fb, LeKoy 
8. Touchdown Flaherty, 
Foley. Referee Campbell. 
Linesman Murphy. 



PYNN — MacBURNIE 



Miss Hazel May MacBurnie, daugh- 
ter of Mr. Clyde R. MacBurnie of ;iu \ 
Corey street, Medford, and Ronald Ed- j 
ward Pynn of this town son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Franklyn Pynn of 28 Leban- 
non street, were married Friday even- i 
ing, Nov. 21, in the Hillside M. E. 
Church by the pastor. Rev. George Al- 
len. The auditorium was attractive- 
ly decorated with chrysanthemums, 
palms and evergreen. Miss Ruth 
Smith played the wedding music on 
the organ, and the soloist during the 
ceremony was Miss Mildred Brook- 
ing. | 

Miss MacBurnie was attended by 
Miss Marion Pynn of Winchester, sis- 1 
ter of the bridegroom, and Mr. Pynn 
had for his best man, Robert Titilah of 
this town. A cousin of the bride, Miss 
Delia (iale of Medford, was flower girl 
and Robert Pynn, brother of the bride- 
groom, was ring bearer. Ushers were 
Lloyd E. Taylor of Medford, cousin 
of the bride*; Woodrow Pynn of W in- 
chester, brother of the bridegroom; ] 
and John Uunning of Brookline, 

The bride wore a wedding gown of 
white satin and carried a bouquet oi 
bride's roses and valley lilies. Miss 
Pynn's gown was of orchid satin and 
she carried yellow roses. The flower 
girl wore a frock of pink silk and car- 
ried a basket of rosebuds, ar.d the lit- 
tle ring bearer wore a tiny full dies- 
suit. I 

Following the ceremony a reception ; 
was held in the church vestry which 
was decorated with chrysanthemums j 
and autumn leaves. The young couple 
were assisted in receiving by Mr. and! 
Mrs. MacBurnie and Mr. and Mrs. I 
Pynn. I'pon their return from an au- ; 
to' honeymoon spent touring through ! 
New Hampshire. Mr. Pynn and his 
bride will make their home in Medford 
on Thomas street. 

The bride was graduated from Med- 
ford Hk'h School in the class of 1928. 
Mr. Pynn is a graduate of Franklin 
Union and is a heating engineer, as- 
sociated with the Boston firm of 
Trask. Pynn Company. 

N EWSY PAR AGRAPHS 



HENRY BILLAUER'S 

Christmas Gifts 

LARGEST VARIETY OF BEAUTIFUL GIFTS THIS SIDE 

OF BOSTON 

This store has been appointed 
AUTHORIZED DEALER 
in the following nationally advertised, and reputable lines: 
VIRGIN DIAMONDS 
ELGIN WATCHES 
(Also Hamilton and Waltham Watches) 
NEW HAVEN-WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CLOCKS 
WILLIAM ROGERS HEIRLOOM SILVER 
WATERMAN'S FOUNTAIN PENS 

Many other fine suggestions for Christmas gifts 
await your inspection. 

Gifts for the whole family, from Baby to Grandpa. 

A small deposit paid now, will reserve any article 
you may select until Christmas. 



Henry Billauer 

Square Deal Jeweler 
327 MAIN STREET WOBURN, MASS. 

(Next to Tanner's National Bank) 

TEL. WOBURN 1072-M 

fj, A telephone call or a post card will bring you free 

I of charge, a list of Christmas suggestions, which you may 
| find helpful. 

. &&&&&&&&&&& 



rushc: 



F.ley dropped back and 



kicked a pretty goal from placement 
to seal Winchester's doom. 



In response to a telephone call on 
Tuesday. Officer Edward O'Connell 
of the Police Department went to 
the residence of Mr. W. E. Robinson 
on Cambridge street and found a 
large limb hanging across an electric 
wire in front of the house. The Edi- 
son Light crew was notified and sawed 
off the limb. 

Utley Smith and Earl Waters of 
Brown are in Winchester for the hol- 
iday week-end. 



DANCING PARTY 

Auspices of 

Greater Boston Federation and Metcalf Union 

UNITARIAN PARISH HOUSE 

DECEMBER 5, 1930—8 TO 12 P. M. 

George Varney's Orchestra 



SEWS! PAkaGRai'HS 

Harris S. Richardson of the Board 
of Selectmen has called attention of 
the slippery condition of Grove street 
beyond Grove place, and has recom- 
mended that the road surface he 
roughed up to prevent undue skid- 
ding in wet weather. Mr. Richardson 
has also called the Board's attention 



to the depth of the gutter in front of 
the National Bank, it being so low- 
that the hub of a car driven too near 
the sidewalk may easily catch upon 
the curbing. Both matters were re- 
ferred to the Superintendent of 
Streets for report. 

Everything tor your Christmas 
packages, wrappings, twine, seals, 
tags, etc., at the Star Office. 



7 



SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT 
OCTOBER 1930 

Assets 

REAL ESTATE LOAN'S 12,632,400.00 

SHARE LOANS 85,615.00 

MATURED SHARE CERTIFICATE LOANS 3,095.00 

PAID-UP SHARE CERTIFICATE LOANS 1,880.00 

REAL ESTATE BY FORECLOSURE 19,537.73 

DUE ON FORECLOSURE SALE 88.95 

COMMON FORM MORTGAGE 5,500.00 

TAXES PAID 803.65 

REAL ESTATE 8,257.00 

CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT 10,000.00 

CASH • 51.682.02 

.$2,818,859.35 

Liabilities 

DUES CAPITAI • $1,503,269.00 

PROFITS CAPITA 1 323.895.40 

MATURED SHARE CERTIFICATES 567,600.00 

PAID-UP SHAKE CERTIFICATES 223,800.00 

DIVIDEND ON MATURED SHARE CERTIFICATES 11,190.00 

DIVIDEND ON PAID-UP SHARE CERTIFICATES. . 5,595.00 

INTEREST AND FINES ACCRUED 530.60 

FORFEITED SHARE ACCOUNT 470.29 

GUARANTY FUND 77,503.79 

SURPLUS C7.-152.4l 

RESERVED FOR FURNITURE AND FIXTURES . . . 6,017.80 

DUE ON CONSTRUCTION LOANS 28,535.00 

$2,818,859.35 

Shares in the November Series For Sale 

Winchester Co-operative Bank 



11 Church Street, Winchester 



Willard T. farkton 
John Challis 
Ernest R. Kustis 
Vincent Farnsworth 
George A. Fcrnald 



DIRECTORS 
James J. Fitzgerald 
Charles A. Gleason 
Daniel W. Hawes 
Alfred H. Hildreth 
James Hinds 



Telephone 1078 

Raymond Merrill 
Curtis W. Nash 
Sewall E. Newman 
Frank E. Randall 
Samuel S. Sj mmes 



SUNDAY SERVICES 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Ilenjamin I". Browne. Paalur. 31 Church 
street. 



Sunday. Nov. 30, 9.30 A. M.-Church 
School. < i ;i . for all axes. 

tf:30 A. M. — Everyman's Class meets in 
social hall. All men welcome. 

10:46 A. M. Momintr worship. Sermon 
by the pastor : "The Renewal of the KiKht 
Spirit." Junior sermon: "Stamlinit Guard.' 
Music by quartet ami senior choir. 

5 P. it. -Meeting of Comrades of the Cross. 
Subject : "Sharing the Beat." 

6 P. M. Y. P. S. C. E. Led by the pa.-tor. 
Subject: "Why lie Moral?" All younit peo- 
ple invited 

7 P. M. — Evening worship. Sermon by 
Rev. Ashley Day U-avitt. D.D. on the sub- 
ject: "If 1 had only one sermon to Preach." 
An organ recital by Mr. Harry L. Sargent 
will open the service, beginning at 7 o'clock. 
Mr. Sargent is organist at the Hancock Con- 
gregational Church, Lexington. Miss Lillian 
Kvans will be the soloist. 

Monday, Dec, l. 8 P. M. Meeting of the 
Philathefl Class at home of Mrs. Howard Cut- 
ting. :l Webster street. 

Tuesday. Dec. 2. 3:30 P. M. Junior Chris- 
tian Endeavor meets in recreation hall. 

Wednesday, Dee. 3. 7:46 1'. M. Prayer 
meeting. Speaker: Dr. J. M. Baker of On- 
gole, India, a man with a most interesting 
message. 

Thursday, Bee. 4, 10 a. m. to 4 p. m. Reg- 
ular all-day sewing meeting of Women's 
League. Luncheon at msjn. 

Friday, Dec. 6, 8 P. M. Meeting of the 
Deacon Hoard in the church parlor. 



SECOND CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 
Rev. John E. Whitley. Pastor. &07 Wash- 
ington street, 'lei. Win. oTjii-J. 



Sunday, 10:30 A. M. An Advent sermon. 

12 M. Sunday School. 

7 P. M. Preaching service. 

Wednesday, Dec, 3 -Ladies' Bethany Society . 
10 to 4 with luncheon at noon. 

Wednesday, 7 :46 P. M. — Mid-week service. 
A study of the 4th Commandment. 

Friday, 7 :45 P. M. Monthly meeting of the ' 
Official Board of the church at the home of 
Mr. ami Mrs. Arthur Helville. Brookside live- 
nue. 

The Every Member Canvass committee are ! 
now ;it work for pledges for the support of ! 
the church 1931. When the canvass is com 
plete a report will be given. 



LOST AND FOUND 



LOST Male Boston Terrier, brindle and 
white; reward. Tel. Win. 1830. 



HELP WANTED 



WANTED General maid, white. Protestant, 
family of three children and two adults; 
nursemaid employed: wages *1~. Write Star 
Office. Uox N. Y. 



LANBSCAPF PLANTING 
SHRUBS Aril) TREES 
at the Melrose Nurseries 

A. M. TUTTLE & CO. 

261 Howard Street. 
Melrose Highlands Mass. 
Tel. Melrose 0042 

mhl5-tf 



TO LET 



TO LET Heated room on bathroom floor. 
47, Vine street. nll-tf 

TO LET Modi i n apartment, suitable for 
dentist, doctor or private family in Winches- 
ter Suuare, ."..".1 Main street. Call Highlands 
6828. niM-ll 

FOR KENT One or two furnished rooms 
in quiet neighborhood, convenient to trains, 
cars and business center. Tel. Win. 1165. * 

FOR KENT Upper apartment of six large 
looms ami sun parlor, redecorated through- 
out. Tel. Win. 0209-W. 



First Class Upholsterirg 

BLIP COVERS MADE TO ORDER 
MATTRESSES 
Repair Work a Specialty 

H. J. ROSCOE 

3a CHESTNUT HI). STOSEHAM 

Telephone 0172-W 
deference »pH-tf Ressonablt 



UNITARIAN ( III Id II 

Rev. George Hale Reed, Minister. 8 Ridge 
field road. Tel. Win. U424. 

Sunday, Nov. 30 Public service of wor- 
j ship at 10:4"). Mr. Reed will preach. Sub- 
ject: "A Great Pilgrim." The primary de- 
partment of the church school, including the I 
, kindergarten through the third grade, will I 
. meet at 10:45. The junior department, in- \ 
j eluding the fourth grade through the eighth. ; 
! will meet at 9:30. The Metcalf Union will 
I meet at iJ, in the Meyer Chapel. The music 
| for the morning service will bo as follows: j 

i Organ Prelude Priori* . . Clausamann : 

I hirst Anthem Sing Alleluia Forth ... Huck 
I Second Anthem In Thee O Lord .... Tours I 
] Organ Postlude Postlude in C Major.. Elgar ' 
] Saturday, Nov. 211 Annual play anil dance 
I if the Metcalf Union in Metcalf Hall at 8 



P 



m. 



FOR SALE 



ONE. TWO AND THREE ROOM 

Apartments in Stetson Hall 

Now ready for occupancy. Rent $15 
to $H0 per month. Every modem con- 
venience, including elevator snd re- 
frigersion. APPLY TO THE JANITOR. 



FIREPLACE WOOD!!! 

4 root lengths (per cord) ...$18.00 

Cut any length (evtra) 2.00 

S20.0D 

Hard mountain growth dried under 
cover. Also, kindling wood, SI 1.00 
and $16.00. ROGER S. BEATTIE, 
tel. Wob. 0439. au29-tf 



THREE PLY ROLL ROOFING 

$1.2.". SLATE SURFACED 

I Ashpslt Shinatra $3.1)0 a square and up 

B!ai k Sheet Steel Ash ( ana 6flc each 

Flat White Paint $1,110 per gallon 

I Hard. Dry Cord Wood $16.00 per cord 

II. M. ALPERIN & CO. 
527 Concord Ave. < amh idge. Mass. 

Tel. Porter 1580— University h«>H 

oSMSt 



FIREPLACE WOOD 

VERY FANCY, all cleft good sised white birch 
$ls per cord. 4 ft. lengths; $20 sawed: maple 
and oak $lti per cord, 4 ft. lengths, $1* 
sawed: kindling wood 6 bu. $1: 20 bu. $3: 
S6 bu. $5. All wood may be seen in >ard at 
62 High street. Woburn. Frizr.cll Uros.. tel. 

Woburn or>7o. si2-tf 

FOR SALE Apples. Macintosh Reds, Bald- 
win an. I Northern Spy. Walter H. Dot ten, 
lo Alhen street, Winchester. Tel. 0726. sf>-tf 



ICE 

HORN POND ICE COMPANY 
Tel. Woburn 0310 



Monday, Dec. 1 Monday Conference Al- 
liance Branches, Arlington Street Parish Hall. 
Iloston, 10-11:30 a. m., Dr. Robert C. Dexter ; 
will speak on, "Social Service and Social Re- 
lations." .Mrs. Arthur G. Bobbins will lie the 
presiding officer. 

Tuesday, Dec. 2 Annual Christmas ha/.aar 
of the Ladies' Friendly Society at 2 p. m. 
Supper will lie served at 6:45 p. m. 

The services in King's Chapel, Boston, will \ 
be in charge of the following: Nov. 25, 26 j 
and L's, Hev. Hoynton Merrill, D.D., Second I 
Chinch in Newton. Nov. 27, II a. m.. Thanks- 
giving Day service, Hev. John Carroll Per- 
kins, D.D., King's Chapel. 

CHURCH OF THE EPIPHANY 

Hi.- Uov, Truman Hcininway, H.D.. Rector, 
phone, Win. 11(22. 

1 1. ac. mess Helen I'. Lane, Win liUlti. 
Parish House, Win. 1022. 



WINCHESTER TRUST COMPANY 

WINCHESTER MASS. 




MEMBER OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



CONDENSED STATEMENT 

as rendered to the Comptroller as of the close of Business Sept. 24, 1930 



RESOl'RCES 
fash and Due from Hanks.. $ 197.128.13 

1'. S. Iionds 219.370.9 1 

Other Stocks and Konds ... 1,099.680.99 

Loans and Discounts 1,113.100.81 

Banking House 62,509.36 



LIABILITIES 

Capital $ 100.000.00 

Surplus and Profits 282,324.79 

Reserve for Taxes and In- 
terest 11,. -.oo.oo 

Reserve for Amortization 

and Depreciation 32,727.95 

Deposits. Commercial 1,163,169.10 

Deposits. Savings 1.102,b68.29 



$2,692,390.23 

Officers 



$ 2,69 2.390.23 



RALPH E. JOSLrIN, President 

FRE ELAND E. HOVEY, Vice President 

FRED L. PATTEE, Vice President 



CHARLES E. BARRETT, Treasurer 

G. DWIGHT CABOT, Assistant Treasurer 

HELEN' M. MONROE, Assistant Treasurer 



CHARLES E. BARRETT 
CUTLER B. DOWNER 
.JERE A. DOWNS 
GEORGE A. FERNALD 
HENRY C. GUERNSEY 



Directors 

H. WADSWORTH HIG1IT 
FREEHAND E. HOVEY 
RALPH E. JOSLIN 
JAMES NOWELL 



WILLIAM L. PARSONS 
FRED L. PATTEE 
EDWIN R. ROONEY 
FREDERIC S. SNYDER 
CHARLES It. SYMMES 



1 lance in the parish house. Friday evening, | 
Dec. .. at 8 o'clock. 

NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Nov. 80 First Sunday in Advent. 
Holy i iinimuiiitiu, S a. in. 
< hurch School, !i ::iu a. m. 
Holy Communion, 9:80 a. in. 
Morning prayer, 11 n. m. 
Kindergarten and primary department, 11 
a. tn. 

Even! wr Prayer, 6 p. m. 

Monday, D.c. 1, 7 a. ni. St. Andrew's Day. 
Holy Communion. 

Tuesday, Dec. 2, 9:30 a. in. Holy Com- 
munion. 

Wednesday, Dec. :!, I p. m. Children's 

service. 

Meetings 

Tuesday, Dec. >. 10 to i. Sewing meet- 
inn; luncheon 12:30 p. m. 

Wednesday, Dec. li, 7 :30 p. in. Evening 
Branch. 

Friday, Dec .", 10:15 a. m. Mrs. Nicholas 
Durke, ' The Life of Prayer." 



l lltsr CHURCH <)l CHltlST, SCIENTIST 

All Seals Free 



CURTAINS AND DRAI'EKIES All kinds 
made to order. We do hematitchim. Perry. 
16 Pleasant street. Mcdford. Tel. Mystic 
D871-J nfi-tf 



BECOND MOKTCACK l.OA.NH made from 
our own funds. We also buy mortgage notes 
or lend on them as collateral. We are not 
brokers and your dealings are solely with us. 
Mystic Valley Morttw Co., 7 Forest Street. 
Medfoid. Phone My«tic 02(18, ja3-tf 



Sunday, Nov. :iil Subject. "Ancient an. I 
Modern Necromancy, alias Mesmerism and 
Hypnotism, Denounced." 

Sunday School at II' o'clock. 

Services in the Church Huilding opposite the 
town Hall. Ill: I.. A. M. 

Wednesday evening meeting al 7 : 1 r, I'. M. 

ItemlittK room in Church lluiUling. Open 
daily In. in 1 l' M. to 0 1'. M, except Sundays 
and holidays. 



Crawford Memorial 
MITIIonisT KPISCOPAI. ( llllltl II 

Corner Church and Dix streets. Rev. 
West Thompson, Minister. Residence, ltd 
-Heel. Tel. Win. 0539-M. 



POSITION WANTED Competent chauffeur 
wants position and willing to help around 
place. Tel. Win. 1 175-M. n21-Jt« 



Mr. 



Vincent V 



POSITION WANTED Woman desires posi- 
tion as housekeeper in small adult family 
Tel. Mrs. Haines. Somerset 1232-W. • 



UPHOLSTERING AND 

FURNITURE REPAIRING 

CABINET, CUSHION, SHADE and 
MATTRESS WORK 

A. E. BERGSTROM 

609 Main Street Tel. Win. 2141 

n88-tf 



Church School at 
Clarke, Supt. Men's Bible Class taught l>\ 
i'rnf. Kenneth Reynolds. Other well equipped 
classes for all ages and a welcome in any of 

them. 

Morning Worship at '10:30. Address by 
Mr-. Clifford s. Lovell. 

Kpworth League devotional miitinir at. 6 
o'clock. The topic is : "Right and Wrong a 



WANTED 

Garage Space 

for one car near the Winchester 
Chambers. Tel. Win. 0018 or 
write Miss Hay den. 7 Lewis rd. s 



Phone 176S Established 1891 

R. E. BELIVEAU 

Formerly A. K. Rergatrom 
CPHOI.STEK1M; AND Kl RN1TUKK 
REPAIRING 
Cu.hion, Mattress and Shad* Work 
KrOnishing 
Decorative Chsirs Made to Order 
16 Thompson St. Winchester. Mass. 



MURRAY— BRESN AN 

The marriage <>f .Miss Ann Eliza- 
beth Bresnan, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Michael J. Bresnan of •'! N'urris 
street, North Cambridge, to Patrol- 
man John Joseph Murray of the Win- 
chester Police Department, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. John J. Murray of 2.'$ Salem 
street, took place on the morning of 
Thanksgiving Day in the Church of j 
St. John the Evangelist, North Cam- 
bridge. 

Rev. Hugh Blunt performed the | 
marriage ceremony at 9 o'clock and ] 
also celebrated the nuptial mass | 
which followed. The altar was at- 
tractively decorated with chrysanthe- 
mums and palms. 

Miss Bresnan was attended by her 
sister. Miss Evelyn G. Bresnan of 

Cambridge, and Patrolman Murray i «••"<•»' pteciwaion." The leaders will be 
. i t u • i, * „,.,., u: . u,.,.,i,„,. : Ronald Hatch and Dorothy Osborne, 
had tor his best man, his brother, Mondav The firat quarterly conference will 
Henry P. Murray of Winchester. Ush- | i„. held in the church parlor at 7:45. A full 
ers were John J. Bresnan of Cam- 
bridge and Arthur O'Leary and 
Charles J. Harrold. both of Winches- 
ter. 

The bride wore a wedding gown of 
white satin, princess style; with a 
veil of tulle and lace, caught up with 
orange blossoms; and carried a bou- 
quet of calla lilies. Her attendant 
wore a gown i f peach transparent 
velvet with a matching velvet pic- | h 
ture hat and carried Talisman roses, i 

After the C( ivmony a reception was 
held and a wedding breakfast served 
at Notre Dame Clubhouse, the bride 
and bridegroom being assisted in re- 
ceiving by their patents. 

Upon their return from a wedding 
journey to Niagara Falls and Canada 
Patrolman and Mrs. Murray are to 
live in Winchester. They will be at 
home after Dec. 15 at 40 Water 
street. 



attendance of the hoard is requested atnl all 
others will he welcome. 

Tuesday The last Kpworth League Institute 
will be held in Stum-hum at 6:45. Dr. Gar- 
field Morgan will be the speaker. Further 
details regarding the program and transporta- 
tion will be given at the League service on 
, Sunday evening. 

Wednesday The prayer service of the 
church will bo held at 7:45, All are invited 
to this service of song, prayer, discussion and 
fellowship. 

Friday The junior choir will meet for re- 
arsal at 3:45. All juniors are invited. 



FIRST CONGREGATION A f . CHURCH 

Rev. Howard .1. Chidley, D.D., Minister. 
Residence, lernway. Til. Win. 0071. 
Mr. Jay A. Wabeke, assistant. 



CARD OF THANKS 



3HICHESTER SPILLS 




THE MAMOMt II KAMI. 

!.. .lA.l.nrrT' 

« M -rWler .XI.., 
fill, in ltd snd f 

beics. .riii- I 




Take no other. Hut of jciur 
l)nnt,t A-i. <-,« III CirVK-TTRII 
IH tVuMI IIHAND PfiXtVn 



tan knowoM Dest. M(w. Al»«vs Rslllhls 

SOLO BY DRUGQISTS EVERYWKEitf 

icb-lyr 



AMERICAN GLASS COMPANY 

Glass For All Purposes 

MIRRORS RESILVERED 

369 Perry St. Everett, Mass. 

Tel. Everett 0»14 

Winchester Calls snd Deliveries Twice 
Weekly- 



We wish to thank our friends and neigh- 
bors for the beautiful floral tributes and kind 
expressions of sympathy extended us in our 
recent bereavement. 

We «r» especially grateful to P, H Ran- 
dall and the employees of the Highway De- 
partment, to the Catholic Daughters of Am. r- 
lea and to the American Legion Auxiliary 
MR THOMAS K KAN and FAMILY 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



Miss Eleanor Ives of ..his town was 
one of the Vincent Club cirls who as- 
sisted in serving refreshments at the 
entertainment given last Friday af- 
ternoon in the Red Cross Hut at the 
Chelsea Naval Hospital under the 
auspices of the hospital committee 
of the Soldiers" and Sailors' Club. 

Old Farmer's Almanac at the Star [ Intendent of the Nurses at Winchester H 
Qj^ ce nJs-tf j pit *'' Com * aMd h,1,u ' tb>s interesting -peak 



Morning worship a'. lo::{n. Dr. Chidley 
will preach the closing sermon in the series 
of the U3rd Psalm, speaking on "Tent-peg 
and (load." The children's choir will sing. 
Children's sermon. "When Truth Went Visit- 
ing." 

Sunday School— Visitors are always wel- 
come. The departments meet as follows: 
IO:Sfl to 11:46, kindergarten and primary de- 
partments: 9:20 to 10:20, junior department, 
grades I, .". and ti. Ripley Chapel: t,, 1. 
iiit* rmediate and senior departments, grades 
7 and H and high School, Ripley Chapel. 

Young People's Society at 6 p. m. in Rip- 
ley chapel. Question box meeting conducted 
by Dr. Chidley. Russell Tompkins, leader. 
Visitors are welcome at this meeting. 

The Biography Club will meet in the sec- 
retary's office next Thursday evening, Dec. 
t at 7:45. "The Story of St. Michele' by 
Munthe, will be discussed. Listeners-in are 
welcome, 

Department of Woman's Work of the Mass- 
achusetts Congregational Conference and 
Missionary Society will meet in Pilgrim hall. 
Ib'st.-n. -in F riday. Dee. 1> at in :.".n a. m. 
Speakers, Mr-. Wm. R. Feet- of Tientsin, 
North China, and Rev. Ralph H. Row-... -ec- 
ntai-y of the City Missionary Society of Bos- 
ton. 

The I.ndies' Western Missionary Society 
will meet on Thursday, Dec. 4 from 10 a. m. 
until 4 p. m. Hoard meeting at 11: lunch- 
con at 12:16. Chairman. Mrs. A. H. .Morten 
sen. tel. Win. 0688- W. Business meeting at 
p. ni Speaker. Miss Hilda Torrop, Super- 



Old Farmer's Almanac at the Star 
Office. n28-tf , 

Mr. Ralph S. Vinal of Salisbury , 
street has resigned from the Board 1 
of Appeal, and Mr. Edward R. Wait 
of Lawson road extension has heen 
selected to fill his place. Mr. Wait's 
term will expire in 193.3. 

Those Edgar Guest Christmas cards 
you have been looking for are at the 
Star Office. ! 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar I'. Taylor of ! 
Brantford, Ontario, and Mr. Eibridge 
Taylor of Brown University ate j 
spending Thanksgiving season with 
Mr. and Mrs. S. W. H. Taylor of Ba- j 
con street. 

Those who like a bit of nonsense on 
their Christmas cards will be pleased 
with the McEvoy box at the Star 
Office. 

ANDRE RELICS IN WASHINGTON j 

Solution of one of the most dra- 
.matic mysteries of the Arctic during 
the four' centuries of Polar explora- 
tion, by the discovery after 33 years 
of the frozen remains of the Swedish 
explorer and aeronaut, Solomon Au- 
truste Andrce, has aroused keen in- : 
terest at the headquarters of the Na- 
tional Geographic Society. Through 
Dr. J. Howard Gore, of Washington, 
one of the founders of the Society, 
relics of the expedition were collected 
at Danes Island in 18H8. the year af- 
ter Andree bepan from there his ill- 
fated air Voyage; and in the same 
year the Society contributed to the 
expedition of Walter Wellman whose 
trip to Fridtjof Nansen Land (then 
Franz Josef Land) had as one of its 
most important aims a search for the 
missing explorer and his two com- 
panions j 
Occupied Andree's House in 
Spitsbergen 
Dr. Gore with an assistant went to 
Danes Island of the Spitsbergen 
group in July 1898, just a year after 
Andree's ascent, to conduct some 
gravitational experiments. The un- 
inhabited island had been left by An- 
dree's supporting party less than a 
; year before. The little house oc- 
cupied by the ballonist was stai.ding 
I and in it Dr. Gore and his companion 
I established themselves. 

In the house Dr. Gore found a 
| wooden replica of the old Swedish - 
I Norwegian Union flair, left by An- 
dree. and this he brought with him 
to Washington together with a sec- 
tion of the crate that had held the 
balloon and an envelope bearing the 
official insignia of the expedition. At 
the time of Dr. ("lore's visit the bal- 
loon and an envelope bearing the of- 
ficial insignia of the expedition. At 
the time of Dr. Gore's visit the bal- 
loon house was standing as it had 
heen left on the day of the ascent, and 
the long wooden runway over the 
jagged rooks was still coated with the 
axle grease that had been smeared on 
to facilitate the take-off. 

An unfortunate down gust of wind 
at the time of the ascent may have 
had much to do with the tragic end- 
ing of the flight, in the opinion of Dr. 
Gore after his careful examination of 
the situation of the balloon house. 
Descending Air Current Caught 

Balloon 

I am convinced, he says, that it was 
a current of descending air. sweeping 
down from the top of the hill, rather 
than any fouling of the drag lines, 
as has heen recently suggested, that 
•ansed the balloon to dip toward the 
water just after it was launched. I 
was told that Andree and his com- 
panions quickly threw over consider- 
able ballast, with the result that the 
bag rose to a great height, lifting tho 



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cleansing. 

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Transparent Velvet is very popular in dresses and wraps but it 
does wrinkle even when worn just once. For this reason we are 
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good steaming and retinishing. Price is $1.50. 

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drag lines out of the water. With the 
lines out of the sea, steering was im- 
possible, so Andree released sonic of 
the hydrogen that he had sought to 
preserve so carefully. The balloon 
then settled down again and when the 
craft disappeared on the horizon it 
was progressing favorably in a wind 
blowing from the south. 

The Wellman Expedition of 1898, 
to which the National Geographic So- 
ciety contributed funds expected to 
find Andree and his companions at 
Cape Flora near the southernmost 
point of Franz Josef Land, which was 
recognized as a nutting place for 
Arctic explorers. Failing to find the 
party, Wellman concluded — erron- 
eously, it now appears— that the bal- 
loonists had perished in the Polar 
waters. 

' Records of the National Geogra- 
phic Society dated 1907 refer to An- 
dree's flight— the first effort t'i con- 
duct Polar exploration through the 
air — as the most daring of all schemes 
of Polar exploration. Outlining the 
Swedish balloonist's scheme, the ac- 
count continues: 

Elaborate Steering Apparatus 
The plan looked to the flotation of 
the balloon some Sol) feet above the 
sea by means of three attached heavy 
guide ropes, each 000 feet long to 



which in turn were attached eight 
ballast lines 250 feet long with which 
it was expected by shifting the posi- 
tion of the guide ropes to change the 
dip etion of the balloon . . . On July 
11 the wind was favorable in strength 
and direction arid everything was 
ready. The balloon named the Ornen 
(Eagle) had its load of about five 
tons of food, ballast, and freight and 
men, and from measurements of es- 
caping gas ba I a flotation life of 

about 30 days The wind 

carried the balloon across the moun- 
tainous island of Vogelsang, making 
it necessary to rise some 1500 feet, 
whence it passi d out of sight in an 
hour, below the northeast horizon. 
As the balloon had at its Ivest a flo- 
tation life of 30 days, it is obvious 
that the report is erroneous of Its 
appearance in Siberia 65 days later. 



Shocked Kem Good Layeri 

GuriN are finding a fresh use. a 
Swedish fnrrner noticed that Ids hen« 
laid just t'.vf.'e as many eggs whlla 
dynamite rock-blast Ing was going on. 
When the blasting had finished, he 
continued a daily dose of shock by fir- 
ing a gun near the henhouse, and 
found the stimulus Just as effective. 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER J8. 1930 



HIGH SCHOOL NOTES 



Winchester High School ha- done 
a great deal to help gather food for j 
the poor for their Thanksgiving din- 
ner which has been prepared by phil- 
anthropic sources of Winchester. The 
officers of the Hed Cross wish to 
thank all the pupils for their kind co- 
operation with the following repre- 
sentatives from the home rooms: 

Otoom 

ti Virginia H.uHe 
II Helen Milry 
11 -Margery Uttle 
'.22 Airatha Hhinnick 

20 Helen !/»■<• 

11 liercedea Speed ie 
24- Natalia Hill 

li, MHrt)in Boyden 
liuili Hathaway 
:ii Mary Corbey 
">d -J irii* felt ingell 

21 EJhabeth Chamberlin 

12 Hilly Kirm 

2* Francea (iaum 

Melina Penta, S.stin<ii<rai.her 



YOl'R AFFAIRS AND MINE 

The Winchesterite who goes with 
the tide of humanity may get on, but 
he never gets anywhere in particular. 

We know a certain fellow here in 
Winchester who is all the time brag- 
ging of his honesty. Everytime we 
hear a fellow brag of his honesty we 
half suspect that honesty does not 
come to him naturally. 

IV haps too many people here in 
Winchester as elsewhere pray for what 
they want when they want it, with 
never a thought of waiting patiently 
until they deserve it. 



Wool Fat ia Commerce. 

Lanolin Is wool fat or wool grease 
In a purified condition. It Is a sun- 
stance consisting chiefly of the esters 
of cholestrin with certain higher fatty 
acids. Prepared commercially from 
wool as a yellowish white, unctuous 
mass. It Is nilscible to a certain ex- 
tent with water. It Is used widely aa 
a basis for ointments. 



Th* Hardeat Bargain 

More than any other kind of bar- 
gain, the marriage bargain needs two 
to make It a success.— American Mag- 
azine. 



Washington on Stamp 

The 10 cent postage stamp of the 
series of 1847 was the first that bore 
the portrait of George Washington. 



Originator of Eaperanto 

Pr. I^iznrus Zamenhof, the man who 
invented Esperanto was a Jew, born 
in Russia. 



Six v:\r\s ushered at the Mollis 
street theatre during the Middlesex 
County Teachers' convention. The 
girls were under the charge of Miss 
Helen Bronson. 

Miss Bronson olso took charge of 
•the dozen git is who packed things 
for Christmas. In all there were 50 
cretonne hags containing the more 
necessary articles of life. 

The officers of the Red Cross for 
the coming year are as follows: 

President Janet Nichols 

Vice President Martha Boyden 

ScciclHry Marjorie Little 

Publicity Chairman Elizabeth Chamberlin 

The poster contest held in the high 
School in observance of book week 
has closed and Daniel West, with his 
modernistic painting, "The Modern 
City Needs Good Books" was the 
winner with Rachel Browne, a sopho- 
more getting second prize for her 
portrayal of a man. The prizes are 
Looks which they choose themselves. 

Those who submitted very good 
posters making it very difficult for 
the judges, Mr. Wade L. Grindle, 
Miss Hi len Bronson and Mr. Ray- 
mond Hayward, to choose among 
who were Virginia Bessie, .John John- 
son, Kenneth Campbell, Aram Moura- 
diiin, Roberta Ilealev, Jean King, 
Winifred Williams, Lucille Pratt. 



"The burying of wires is a grave 
question," remarks a fellow towns- 
man who favors putting all overhead 
wires under ground. 

A Winchester housewife complains 
that some coffee she bought recently 
was full of dirt. Guess she must have ! 
got some of the ground coffee. 



Lightning's Freak 

In one of the most severe thunder- 
storms experienced In Innerleithen, 
Scotland, Adam Small was killed by 
lightning which struck the boat in 
which he was fishing, the bolt tear- 
ing off a heavy fishing boot, but not 
disturbing his watch, which was tick- 
ing when the body was found the 
next day. 



A Gift That Lasts 

Give A RADIO 



Always do what you think is right, 
anil remember that this is quite a 
different thing from always thinking 
what you do is right. 



Sticks to at least one Winchester 
farm — the mortgage. 

A new bride of our acquaintance 
says Winchester hens are the most 
intelligent she ever heard of, for they 
lay eggs just the right size to fit 
her new egg cups. 



STRAND ATTRACTIONS 

The feature attraction at the 
Strand Theatre, Maiden starting Sat- 
urday, Nov. 29 will be a comedy ver- 
sion 'of that famous picture shown 
in Maiden a short time ago the "Big 
House." "Up the River" is unques- 
tionably one of the funniest talkies 
ever made, and it sets a new style in 
. comedy. 

The picture "Big House" became 
famous for its tense drama, "Up the 
River" was made expressly for the 
uproarious activities of a team of 
burglars and jail bn akers. 

With an all-star cast of seven well 
known screen and stage players, Uni- 
versal has made what is claimed to be 
one of the outstanding dramas of the 
year, "A Lady Surrenders" which 
will be the second feature at the 
Strand Theatre starting Saturday. 
Adapted from the popular novel "Sin- 
cerity" by John Erskine, "A Lady 
Surrenders" is a blending of ultra- 
sophistication and astute subtlety. 

WINCHESTER WOMEN'S REPUB- 
LICAN CLUB 

The regular monthly meeting of 
the Women's Republican Club will be 
held at Association Hall, Vine street, 
Wednesday. Dec. 3 at 2:30 p. m. The 
.speaker will be Mrs. Alfred Radley 
who will talk on "Tripping I (trough 
the Tropics" with pictures, this will 
lv a continuation of a talk which Mrs. 
Radley gave last year which was en- 
joyc I so much by our members. Mrs. 
Radley's pictures are very interest- 
ing and We are looking (.award to 
seeing some more of them and hear- 
ing her tell of her experiences in for- 
>eii-n lands. 

Mrs. Idabelle Winship will be the 
■soleist of the afternoon. Tea and a 
social hour will follow the meeting. 

WINCHESTER RED ( ROSS 

It is our ambition and our fondesl 
hope to enroll every one in our an 
mini roll call. It h;,v " " o1 
enrolled it may be that you were net 
:it home when our worker called. 

But nlease don't forget us, we need 
werv $1. and Mr. Priest at the W in- 
che-tpr Saving-. Bank is glad to ex- 
cept vour member-hip there. 1a H 
enmpaie-n for funds is a struggle 
these davs But please remember that 
Red Cross money returns in the form 
„f service and relief to the people of 

the town. 

WINNING WINCHESTER POH <;<>D 
iWritten for The Winchester Star) 

SOT "the sr«ln°%ho 

■ r, • blessiwrs ot Better Living Known 
TM., aad-ryml person, weary and alone. 
Thnu^ strong in God. in faith and native 

To win Wtnchs«t.-r tor God a nobl- .•>!•••;> '.> 
Po ,,, shall come in ardent buoyant youth, 
V ith consecrated power, and cultured Brace. 
•The willine mesaenBcr of Peac* and Truth. 

KuKone Bertram Willard 



Ye modern Winchester flapper 
wears out few brooms. 

Some people here in Winchester are 
peculiar. They won't jump at a 
chance to eat frogs' legs. 

"Star Reader" suggests a Boost 
Winchester marathon. 



A citizen can talk freely to a Star 
reporter regardless of the fact that 
some people think a reporter prints 
everything he hears and a lot he does 
not hear. 



"They ought to stop those prize 
fights," a woman writes to the Star. 
Fights have always interested the 
world since the first woman pitched 
a petrified rolling pin at her husband. 

The tactful Winchesterite has sim- 
ply due regard for the feelings of 
others. 

And the Winchesterite who insinu- 
ates does more harm to reputation 
than if he attacked directly, for insin- 
uations stimulate imagination to do 
its woi st. 

The Paragrapher 



NEWSY PARAGRAPH" 

Patrolman Michael O'Connell, at- 
tached t' Station 2 in Boston, a broth- 
er of Patrolmen Edward and Archie 
O'Connell of the Winchester Police, 
had a narrow escape from possible 
death lasl Saturday evening when he 
was shot at by a hit-and-run driver 
who he was trying to stop. The 
operator was finally taken in Somer- 
ville after a chase. Patrolman 
O'Connell has figured in the head 
lines before, having been awarded a 
medal fi l- saving a man from drown- 
ing in Boston Harbor at the risk of 
hi- own life. 

The Misses Ann and Lucia McKen- 
zie and Miss May O'Connell of this 
tnvn attended th" Harvard — Yale 
game at New Haven last Saturday 
as guests of a member of the Yale 

squad. 
Mr.. K 



mahue who has 
•hestev with Mr. 
Henry of High- 
I to her home in 
week-end. Miss 



Catherine D< 
h i n visit ing in \Vin< 
and Mrs. Clarence II. 
'and avenue returnei 
Thomaston. Me., last 
Kntherine Henry accompanied Miss 
Donahue to spell 1 the holiday week 

in Thomaston, 

Frank Goodhue, properietor of the 
Highland service station on Cross 
-tree! and "Larry" Lasson id Medford 
have just returned from a hunting 
| trip in Sawyer Valley, Me., where 
I they shot two large deer. Many 
Winchester people are assured of 
having venison on Thanksgiving Day. 

Many residents, including early 
Christmas shoppers, are taking ad- 
vantage of the factory sale of the 
Jordan- Wakefield Company of fine 
reed and rattan furniture at 328 Main 
street, Wakefield, opposite the public 
library. 

Twelve tables of bridge were en- 
tertained Monday evening at the- home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. B. Wood of 
Highland avenue for the benefit of 
Winchester Chapter O. E. S. 



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TEL. WIN. 2070 



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Not Valualle Waterway 

The Hudson hay is not nr. Important 
waterway because of the proximity of 
lis entrance t<> the Ar.tlc regions. 
|>usi the mouth of the strait Hows a 
Btrenm, often more than 1<*> "»<«*• 
wide of her- nml rloe lee, caused by 
Arctic current. This makes navi- 
gation ditlieult and almost Impossible 
in the winter season. The proximity 
,if the entrance to the magnetic pole 
Also causes the compass needle to M 
mine unreliable. The only good uar 

tor is mi for' D.p.r.-hill. 

World - . Muaical Standard 

International pitch is the one udopt- 
■e,| by the Vienna congress in Novem- 
ber I8S7. It had been adopt**! in 
rnu.ee iu ISTfl. I'revlous to the Vien- 
na congress, held for choosing •* 
ard pitch, there had been great con 
fusion, due to the variety of ptt-'hes 
nse«t lnteriniiiot.nl pitch has t:?.« doll 
•We vibrations a second for the tone A. 
It Is now the standard for the whole 
world. 



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Tel. Wob. 1430 

LICENSE 205 



BY WILLIAM J. McANEENY 
President, Hudson Motor Car Company 

W^E have built these models up to and beyond the 1931 
standards of performance and quality in every way, and 
have never in our history offered so many improvements. 
Quality is greater down to the last detail. Every phase of 
performance has been greatly improved, and the luxury we 
have built into the cars is substantially greater than ever 
before. Motors are larger and more powerful. An efficient 
system of oil cooling is introduced. A marked improvement 
in carburetion increases flexibility and economy. Bodies are 
longer and wider. These cars possess the finest, easiest riding 
qualities. For the first time, such comfort is available at 
these low prices. Only great manufacturing economies and 
the fact that our large resources permit us to take the fullest 
possible advantage of reduced commodity prices have en- 
abled us to offer the public the greatest combination of qual- 
ity and low prices in our entire history. 



Owner-Management Permits 
Exclusive Value Advantages 

Owner-management enables Hudson- 
Essex to give you outstanding -idV 
vantages in quality and pnre. The 
men wlio are mm guiding its destinira 
have bt-«n with the company since its 
inception twenty -two years ago. Its 
department heads and principal dis- 
tributors are its controlling owners. 
Their independence is backed by un- 
usually large resources in capital and 
plant facilities. It enables Hudson- 
Essex to Irad in design and engineer- 
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manufacture and distribution that 
bring exceptional quality direct to the 
public ai distinct price advantages. 



See both new cars at these places today 

WATLER H. DOTTEN 



10 ALBEN STREET 



TEL. WIN. 0726 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28 1930 



i) 



NEEDLEWORK GUILD OF AMERI- 
CA, WINCHESTER BRANCH 



The 21st annual meeting of the 
Guild was held at the Unitarian 
Church parlor, Nov. 19, with a rec- 
ord attendance. The president, Mrs. 
Harry C. Sanborn, conducted the 
meeting. 

Mrs. Frank W. Roberts was elect- 
ed secretary, taking the place of Mrs. 
E. L. Dunning who has most accepta- 
bly filled this position for the past 
four years. 

Mrs. George W. Fitch was elected 
treasurer, to fill the vacancy caused 
by the resignation of Mrs. E. W. 
Went worth. 

Miss Hilda M. Torrop, superintend- 
ent of the Winchester Hospital gave 
a most interesting talk on the work 
of the hospital and of the nurses. 

About 'MM) attractive, warm gar- 
ments, including dresses, underwear, 
stockings, etc. were displayed and 
after the meeting these articles in- 
cluding seven pairs of blankets were 



distributed among the welfare agen- 
cies of our town. 

The Needlework Guild is surely one 
of our finest charities. Much good is 
accomplished with no great tax upon 
any one person. 

The officers of the Guild appreciate 
the courtesy of the standing com- 
mittee of the church, for allowing the 
Guild the use of the spacious parlor 
in the Parish House in which the 
making and exhibition of garments 
took place. 

Big "Jim" Fitzgerald kicked the 
first three points into the Fitton— 
Fere Marquette semi-pro football 
game last Sunday in Boston, the 
former Winchester and Tufts star 
tkn ting over a pretty field goal from 
an agle at the 25-yard line. Most 
..f the Fitton running plays were 
made behind "Jimmy" and the tow- 
ering tackle was a bulwark on de- 
ft nse. There are few linemen in the 
"•mi-nro ranks who can outplay big 
"Jim." 



(Contnued from page 1) 



A Lecture on Christian Science 



In consequence we are privileged 
this evening to listen to a lecture on 
Christian Science by a member of 
this Board of Lectureship. It is en- 
titled "Christian Science: The An- 
Lgelic Message," and the lecturer is 
one for whom we all feel great love, 
because we know of the consecrated 
work which she has done for many 
years to forward our beloved Cause. 
It is indeed a privilege and my 
pleasure to present to you, Miss M. 
Ethel Whitcomb, of Boston, Mi.-s 
Whitcomb; 



In Luke's Gospel 



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MEN'S SUITS . . $1 
WINTER COATS $1 

(fur trimmed fxtra) 

FUR COATS $3.50 u » 
6 NECKTIES . . 75c 
FELT HATS . . . 75c 



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it is written, 
"And suddenly there was with the 
angel a multitude of the heavenlv 
host praising God, and saving, Glory- 
to God in the highest, and on eart.'i 
peace, good will toward men." This 
wondrous chorus of angels is still 
singing, "Fear not: for, behold, I 
bring you good tidings of ureat joy, 
which shall be to all people." Do 
any of you question, What are the 
good tidings that the angels are sing- 
ing today'.' Christian Science an- 
swers that these tidings of great joy, 
these angelic messages, are nothing 
less than a revelation of the demon- 
strable fact that the same spiritual 
Truth which healed through Jesus of 
Nazareth is here today, bidding 
the dumb to speak, the lame to walk, 
the blind to see. Christian Science 
has already healed its unnumbered 
thousands and sent them on their way 
singing with the angels, "Glory to 
God in the highest, and on earth 
peace, good will toward men." It is 
a divine fact that all that anyone 
can need to make him whole, to set 
him free from poverty, pain, defeat, 
sin, and what is termed old age, is 
the angelic message of the true un- 
derstanding of God and of the real 
man, and to apply it. 

What is an angel? To a Christian 
Scientist an angel is not a celestial 
personality with feathered wings, 
but an exalted idea from divine 
dind, an inspirational thought-visi- 
tant. Do angels really speak? Yes, 
uuy forever conic with their mes- 
sages, and guide and heal and light 
our way. If this be so, what deaf- 
ens us that we do not hear their call? 
Is it not the love of material things, 
the love of self, of purse, of praise? 
When do we hear these angel mes- 
sengers? When the heart bathes in 
humility, and yearning to be used by- 
Cod, whispers. "Speak, Lord; for thy 
servant heareth." Then is conscious- 
ness made ready to receive God's 
impartation of ideas which forever 
pass in angelic processions from 
Him to man. 

Mrs. Eddy defines angels in "Sci- 
ence and Health with Key to the 
Scriptures" on page 581, as "God's 
thoughts passing to man; spiritual 
intuitions, pure and perfect; the in- 
spiration of goodness, purity, and 
immortality, counteracting all evil, 
sensuality, and mortality." Who is 
not stirred by the mighty truth that 
God pours forth His spiritual 
thoughts to man? Every moment 
id' inspiration, intuition, goodness, 
gratitude, purity, or selflessness is a 
moment with the angels. Let us lis- 
ten that we may hear them as they 
pass to us. There is not a person in 
this audience who has not at some 
time been conscious of an angel. An 
angel has brought each one of us 
here tonight, because every least de- 
sire for good is an angel visitant. 

ANGKLS WERE BEARD HY PROPHETS 
AND APOSTLES 

Great characters of Scripture, in 
the midnight of human woe, were 
strengthened and inspired by angels, 
were delivered from dungeons by 
angels, were led on to holy tasks and 
grand achievements by angels, Abra- 
ham knew the angels. Jacob in his 
struggle at Peniel was transformed 
by an angel. Moses entertained an- 
gels and in the wilderness declared, 
"And when we cried unto the Lord, 
he heard our voice, and sent an an- 
gel, and hath brought us forth out of 
Egypt." Daniel, standing unharmed 
in the den of lions, said unto the king, 
"My Cod hath sent his angel, and 
hath shut the lions' mouths, that they 




have not hurt me." Paul, when the 
storm was raging and shipwreck was 
at hand, assured those with him in 
the ship of their deliverance bv the 
power of God. "For," he "said. 

there stood by me this night the 
angtl of God, whose I am. and whom 
I serve, saying. Fear not. Paul." And 
it is further recorded. "And so it 
came to pass, that they escaped all 
safe to land." Jesus knew God's 
angels better than did any man. and 
walked in companionship with them. 
So real was tueir presence to him 
that when his enemies came to take 
him he was able to say to one of his 
followers, "Put up again thy sword 
into his place. . . . Thinkest thou 
that I cannot now pray to my Fath- 
er, and he shall presently t'ive me 
more than twelve legions of angels?" 

COD 

Actually to expect to hear the an- 
gels,— impartations from divine good, 
— and to be guided, inspired, and 
guarded by them as were these men 
of old, we must know God as He is. 
Christian Science satisfies the heart 
with its glorious views of God as 
Mind, incorporated Mind, the all-know- 
ing, the all-present, divine, infinite 
intelligence, and this Mind. Love, 
tender, living, available L( ve in whom 
man lives and breathes as individual 
consciousness, for this Mind is the 
very life of all, the sole governor of 
the universe and man. From this 
Mint! proceeds the only law,— the di- 
vine edict of good, forever operating 
for, not against humanity, a law of 
renewal, invigoration, and eternal 
unfoldment to man. 

Man draws from this divine Mind, 
this infinite Life, his vitality, energy, 
health, all that enables him to com- 
prehend, to act, to be. God actually 
talks with man. as the Scriptures 
say, in the sense that He imparts to 
them His own thoughts and spiritual 
afflatus. Such messages were named 
by early prophets, "angels." They 
come to you and to me today, this 
hour. God speaks and man can hear. 

MAN 

"What is man," queried David, 
"that thou art mindful of him?. . . 
For thou hast made him a little low- 
er than the angels, and hast crowned 
him with glory anil honour." Had 
David's thought risen another step 
in inspiration he might have said, 
Thou hast made man as the angels. 
All Christians accept the basic state- 
ment of Scripture that (Jed created 
man in His own likeness. Like the 
infinite Father, is the real man, or 
spiritual idea, in quality, nature, and 
essence. Christian Science teaches 
us to look away from the hateful, 
sinning, and warped deflection, or 
mortal, to become acquainted with 
the reflection of God, — the man who 
reflects the qualities of divine Mind 
in the radiance of right thinking. 

We can never obey Scripture and 
put off "the idd man with his deeds," 
the old human concept of man with 
his stubborn disposition, nervous 
temperament, and weak character 
and constitution. — all unloveliness. 
— until we catch glorious glimpses of 
our identity in the likeness of divine 
Love, and maintain it, thereby refus- 
ng to express a thought, motive, or 
desire that springs not from the 
heart of God. 

Man is the activity of God's 
thoughts, a pure, spiriual, boundless 
idea in Mind, an idea that cannot be 
separated from the light and loveli- 
ness of divine Mind throughout eter- 
nity. How can the man who knows 
that right ideas are passing to him 
from divine Mind every hour of the 
day and of the night he sorrowful, 
lonesome, or homesick? He is at 
home in the Mind that holds him. is 
forever in the company of God's 
ideas, hearing, and joyfully follow- 
ing their leadings through the activi- 
ties of every daj£. 

New inspiration and zeal come to 
the business man who learns that lie 
ran draw from God intelligent ideas 
to solve his every problem. From 
this point of vision he responds to 
the law of divine achievement. The 
work of the writer, the musician, the 
inventor, will immediately improve 
when they see that man. of himself, 
does not create, but rather hears and 
expresses inspired ideas which pass 
continually from (iod to man. When 
this is realized there will be no lapse 
from inspiration. Through Christian 
Science thousands are learning of the 
coming of God's ideas, are depending 
upon them in the office, in the work- 
shop, in the kitchen, in the school- 
room; and thereby ar» doing bigger 
and grander things than they have 
ever done. The function of divine 
Mind is to impart and the function 
■ 'f man is to receive and express, for 
man is God's expression, 

In Scripture we read that Elijah 
was in the wilderness, — the wilder- 
ii' ^s of fear, depression, and terror. 
"And as he lay ami slept under a 
juniper tree, behold, then an angel 
t( uched him, and said unto him. 
Arise and eat." The angel that 
touched Elijah and called him to arise 
and i at was inspiration from divine 
I ove which flooded his thought. Is 
anyone hi re in a wilderness of hu- 
man experience, asleep under a juni- 
per tree of discouragement or self- 
condemnatii n, feeling that he is a 
failure or perhaps responding to ha- 
tred because of some letter wrong? 
Awake! for an angel 
God is touching you. 
arise from dreams of 
j the strengthening br< 
! ideas. We sometimes hear 
iv that they have a touch of 



rheumatism, of depres 
feel, perhaps, an hypn< 
we should know that 
sensitive only to the to 
and is responsive to no 



thought from 
calling you to 
sense and eat 
•ad of inspired 
people 
•dd. Of 

sion. or even 
die touch, but 
God's man is 
ueh of antrels, 



, to our problem, or inspiring us with 
new purpose, new desires, new views 
of God and of our brother, we may 
, know that we are with an innumera- 
: ble company of angels— are Reeling 
I their holy touch. We are then think- 
ing God's thoughts after Him. Such 
thinking heals the sick. 

PRAYER 

Many people come to Christian 
Science, seeking, as did I, to under- 
stand how to pray aright to the in- 
1 finite, unseen Father. The yearning 
to approach Him who holds "the uni- 
! verse in the hollow of His hand, is a 
' deep longing that will come at some 
time to every heart. "Ve ask, and 
^ receive not, because ye ask amiss," 
are the Scriptural words that arouse 
the awakening thought to ask. How 
1 can I pray aright ? I asked and re- 
ceived not because I asked amiss in 
an hour of great need. I was a young 
girl at this time. My mother was in 
aire distress, for she had been des- 
perately ill with what the physicians 
pronounced a dangerous disease of 
the lungs. A i\ result she was left 
in such a state that for nr.onths she 
had lain almost lifeless. With all 
my heart I atked God c . heal In r. 
Many times upon my knees I prayed 
such a prayer oi supplication, bul I 
received no answer. At the end of 
five months, after two t'oetors had 
been in consultation, they told us that 
our mother was in a most dangerous 
condition. A;, this timo we sent to 
Chicago for Iter sister, who was the 
wife of a physici tn. We knew that 
she had been healed ihrougn Chris- 
tian Science of an eye trouble that 
had been pronounced incur abW and 
which had made her almost blind. 
Even this healing had aroused no in- 
terest in our thought toward Chris- 
tian Science. As my aunt entered 
my mother's room she seemed to 
bring with her a flood of hope and 
light. My mother said to her, "Take 
II 



•tist of seven once said. "God made 
I man out of Love because He did not 
J Ve anything else to make him of." 
This child voiced sublime logic. He 
Who is all good has only good out of 
which to create His likeness. He who 
I sees no evil and knows no evil can 
j imnart no evil. Man. then, who is 
j the very reflection of perfect Mind 
I sprang from perfection itself and 
i mt n °* bt ' d* sea sed nor impaired. 
What, then, is sick? and how does 
Christian Science heal? 

1 once passed a veiled statue that 
■ was waiting to be uncovered. 1 knew 
| the statue to be very beautiful, but 
how ugly it looked that day, covered 
with its grimy veil! Then my 
thoughts, or inward eyes, turned to 
the leal man. the beautiful, pure, and 
fair image of God. That which to the 
outward eye appears to be sick and 
impure man. I now realized is merely 
the veil which covers the real. The 
Christian Science treatment or prayer 
tears away, through its divine impul- 



sion, the veil. 



reveals man in all 



my medicine way. 
Christian Science, 
filled with terror 
family doctor cam* 



!p me through 
1 recall how 
I was when the 
■ in about an hour 



other. In her 



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book, "Miscellaneous 
Eddy says i p. 306 ) 
visit us. we dr 
wings, nor fee 
the breast of 
their presence 
in our hearts 
this touch.— it 
hands, nor a loVi 
it is more than th 
idea that li-rhts your 
know their presence by 
create in our hearts, 
then, a loving lonering t 
sings in our hearts 
less deed is done. 



Writing," Mrs. 
"When angels 
not hear the rustle of 
the feathery touch of 
a dove; but we know 
by the love they create 
Oh, may you feel 
is rot the clasping of 
'•son present; 
is a spiritual 
path!" "We 
the love they 
Whenever, 
i bless others 
whenever a self- 
we entertain an 



fie 
it 



angel, Whenever a spiritual idea 
lights our path, bringing the answer 



and I told him that mother had turned 
to Christian Science. He said, "This 
is a very serious affair. Christian 
Science is a beautiful religion, but 
what can it do for diseased lungs? 
Your mother is in a most critical con- 
dition. You will have no hope left 
if she turns from medical treatment." 
I was panic-stricken and implored my 
mother to continue with the doctor's 
help. Her thought was firm as she 
said, "1 have lain here helpless for 
months. You must let me have what 
1 wish." It seemed the most in- 
tense struggle that I have ever had, 
to trust her to God, in spite of the 
Scriptural declaration that He heal- 
eth all our diseases. In deep emotion 
I said to my aunt, "Tell me some- 
thing that I can do to help." With 
steadfast faith in the availability of 
the law of God to deliver and save, 
she said to me. "Take your Bible and 
hold to the first v< rse in Psalm 40, 
Every won! is true and can he proved 
true. When you read I be first word, 
'God,' in the promise, know that this 
God is man's Life and that in this 
Life your mother lives and breathes 
in freedom." I went to my room, 
took my Bible, and for hours read, 
wrote, and reread this promise, seek- 
ing to know the meaning of each 
word. "God is our refuge and 
strength, a very present help in trou- 
ble." How much nearer God appeared 
as I thought id' Him as Life itself in 
whom we live and move, "(iod is-," 
— not was, not will be; is today our 
refuge, our shelter, and protection 
from danger and distress. How 
forceful that word, "is"! "Strength," 
—the next word in the promise. "God 
is our refuge and strength." What 
could bring greater comfort! For 
the first time I looked away from 
matter to find my mother's true 
strength and began to feel certain 
that the impartation of div ine energy 
was renewing her. "A very present 
help in trouble." "Present," — no! ab- 
sent; here, not there; to-day, not to- 
morrow, our help, our divine as- 
sistance. She does not have to die 
that she may find Life, I thought, 
for here, in this hour, God, Life, is 
her refuge, her strength, her present 
help. Christian Science had begun 
to illumine the Bible for me and 
through its divine light I commenced 
to catch a faint glimpse of the pray- 
er that appropriates instead of pleads 
for the thinirs of (iod. I saw, though 
dimly, why I had formerly asked and 
received not. I had implored God to 
give my mother what lie had never 
failed to give her and to everyone, — 
even His strength. His life, His help, 
His all of good. During that night 
my aunt sat by my mother's bed in 
silent prayer. What was the result 
of this prayer? That which to us 
was a veritable miracle. My mother 
was able to sit up the next day. The 
fifth day she took my aunt to ride, 
she herself driving the horse. The 
doctor who witnessed this healing of- 
ten told people that no one who had 
seen my mother'.: case could doubt 
that Almighty Cod healed her. 

We believe that it i^ a vain re- 
quest to ask tie Coil who is Love it- 
self for more love, or to implore the 
divine Mind which is never absent 
from man to come closer. Can a 
mother whose In art is beating in 
tonderost love for her child give more 
because the child implore her? I- 
it not recogn'tion, acceptance, and 
thankfulness which the child needs? 
Christian Science teachi s us as old r 
children to recognize the Mother- 
love of God, ever present, every hour, 
everywhere, and to accept through 
the prayer of perception, utilization, 
and thanksgiving God's perpetual 
out-pouring of health and goodness. 
Jesus prayed the prayer of recogni- 
tion and thanksgiving before he 
raised Lazarus from the dead, "Fath- 
er, I thank ther> that thou hast heard 
me. And I knew that thou nearest 
me always." 

HEALING 

A physician once said to me. "I toe- 
tors often classify disease under two 
heads, -curable and incurable. Do 
Christian Scientists classify disease?" 
I replied, "Yes, but all under one 
class, — curable." We base our con- 
viction o." this mighty truth on the 
Biblical facts that God, the only 
creator, formed man and the uni- 
verse as the expression or reflection 
of His own substance, perfection, and 
glory, and that they remain forever 
intact. As a little Christian Scien- 



his God-given wholeness. The veil, 
then, not man. is the patient, which 
Mil. Paul says, "is done away in 
( hrist. ' W e cannot love the veil", but 
with eyes of spiritual knowing we can 
look thr< ugh it and behold ami rever- 
ence thj man whom the infinite sculp- 
tor has chiseled. In the language of 
Christian Science, "unveil" might be 
a synonym for "heal." Another syno- 
nym for "heal" might be "correct." 
God's thoughts, or angels, come 
through treatment or prayer," to cor- 
rect the mistaken belief of life in mat- 
ter with thi' sublime fact of life in 
God; to correct the fear of bods, of 
food, of climate, of human inheritance, 
of limited capacities, of material laws, 
to correct evil appetites and false at- 
tractions with the true understanding 
of the God who is Love, impartial and 
universal, and of man's indissoluble 
unity with this all-satisfying Love. 
As this divine correction takes place 
in thought, erroneous beliefs give 
place to right ideas, and the body 
springs into spontaneous freedom. 

A woman, whom I know, who had 
been severely injured in an accident, 
ai tended a Christian Science church, 
several weeks after, assisted by 
friends. During the hour she was 
completely healed. I talked with her 
after this service; her face was wet. 
with tears of thankfulness as she told 
me of her healing, What had taken 
place? Simply this: her God-given 
freedom, forever intact, had been un- 
veiled to her thought through tin- 
truth that flowed from Coil at that 
service. This explains how people are 
so often healed during Christian Sci- 
ence lectures. They grasp an idea 
a .- angel — from God which illumines 
consciousness and corrects their false 
thinking. Time has m part in thei 
hi'iilmo work id' Christian Science. 
Whenever the false thought -processes 
of which the seeming ifs'-as • is made 
gives way to spiritual ideas, behold, 
hialing takes place. It may be ill a 
day, a wei k. a month, but correction 
of thought will be followed by the re- 
moval of the discordant effects. 

Many years ago a man, lame fr mi 
birth, spoke to Peter and John at the 
gate Beautiful. They voiced to him 
the life-giving word of Truth, and it 
is written that "immediately his . . . 
ankle bones received strength." Th • 
spiritual correction and its results up- 
on the body were instantaneous. Let 
ni one be disheartened if he has si- 
lently declared what is divinely trip- 
about the perfection of God and His 
real man and has denounced bravely 
'h' imperfections of sense and self, 
but. has m t yet felt the touch of lib- 
erty. This minute, or perhaps tho 
next, false education and erroneous 
thinking may rive way before the an- 
gelic vision, tie- Christly corrective, 
and you rise in your God-given domin- 
ion, 

As sons of (iod we should know at 
all times th-it we can hoar and annro- 
priate spiritual idpas from God that, 
will enable us to be efficient workers 
in the world. All that anyone can 
ever need to deliver him from pain or 
eoverty. from vice or crisis, is an 
idea from Cod. Forget not that tha 
angel idea, the enlightening and sav- 
in? idea, is ever ;,t the gate of eon- 
^ciousiv'us, wait'ng for your accept- 
ance. Th p se mightv facts are healing 
sieds of Truth which when sown in 
receptivity and affirmation grow into 
realization and bloom in exaltation 
and demonstration. 

CHRIST JESUS 

Centuries ago multitudes in pain 
and misery gathered about Jesus of 
Nazareth on the hillside of Jtidea, 
to hear the marvelous word of Life. 
Tin' sublime truth which he spoke cor- 
rected the falseness of their material 
thinking, and they went away whole, 
glorifying the God of Israel. Th" lifu 
and works of Christ Jesus mean every- 
thing to Christian Scientists, for they 
recognize him as their Way-shower, 
t ie one who has shown them the di- 
vina and definite way to work out 
i very problem of human life. They 
strive to fobow in the very thought- 
uteps id' this God-inspired Teacher. 
They endeavor to s rve as he served, 
(•> bl< s< as he blessed, and to con- 
i|ui r materiality with spirituality at 
every point as did he 

This greatest of al; raetar>hvsicians 
di ftm d evil as both "liar" and "lie," 
a"d corrected th" Me with the force 
of omnipotent Truth. Because he knew 
•hat sip. fear, sorriw. disease, and 
torment were no part of God's crea- 
t ; on. and henc- were n t t us, he abol- 
ished them with a word. Because evil 
in every form is a lie about th" all- 
Kood an ! all-perfect creator and cre- 
ation how can it be banished from the 
earth except by refusing assent to 
its claims and by maintaining the 
troth a! oof our creator and His cre- 
ation? Was a lie ever vanquished in 
anv other way? Jesus never bower! 
before so-called laws of nature result- 
ing in disaster, disease, and death: but, 
with victorious understanding of God's 
law of harmony and perfection, he an- 
nulled the'r spurious claims as false- 
hoods. As Christian Scientists follow 
their Way-shower, they steadfastly en- 
deavor to preserve the vision of reali- 
ty, — a God who is t >o good to create 
evil and a man who is too pure and 
perfect to express evil. Thev consider 
it a spiritual duty to mankind to rec- 
ognize and silently hold to the glori- 
ous spiritual opposite of every lie of 
(Contnued to page 10) 



10 



THE WINCHESTER. MASS., STAR. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 28. MO 



(Continued from page 9) 



A Lecture on Christian Science 



animslty and imperfection which eon- 
fronts them. To then a lie is never 
final. Truth itself is final. Therefore 
in the presence of the lie of disease 
they stick to the truth of God-given 
health. In the presence of the lie of 
sin, they maintain the reality of God- 
imparted purity. Thu^ they stand with 
their thinking identified with the di- 
vinely true, the Christ Science, and a- 
they stand humanity wins. 

CHRIST 

Jesus never claimed that his mighty 
works were done through his own pow- 
cr. Did he not say, "I can of mine 
own self do nothing"? He affirmed 
to those who listened that the same 
works which he did could be accomp- 
lished throughout the ages by those 
who understand and believe in the 
living, present < hi ist, the divine mani- 
festation of God, which he promised 
should In' with men "even unto the 
end of the world." 

Christian Scientists acknowledge 
( hrist Jesus as the Way-shower, rec- 
ognizing that Christ is "the way, the 
truth, and the life" Over the surging 
sea of human discord the Christ, 
Truth, forever chows on its healing 
mission, saying to each suffering one, 
"It is I; be nut afraid." 

ANCEI.S DELIVER US FROM FALSE 
MENTAL SUGGESTIONS 

People who are striving to live pro- 
gressive lives are recognizing that our 
thinking makes us what we are. Be- 
cause of this they know that thoughts 
which would neither beautify nor edi- 
fy tln ir mental homes must nut he 
spoken nor given a moment's hear- 
in:'. Sooner or later every thought 

thai is unlike God must tie detected 

and mustered by j: I. N'.i one can 

he excused from this divine demand. 
Matt lew write-, •'The Ron of man 
shall send forth his angels, and they 
shall father nut of his kingdom all 
things that offend." Some of the false 
suggestions that must lie gathered out 
nf i. ur mental kingdom are those that 
beget sameness, smallness, and s mr- 
ries<. Sameness, or staleness, comes 
from doinu one's work, whatever it 
may lie. as a duty instead of as a privi- 
lege, with mere motion instead nf in- 
spired aet. 'Hi. Fresh health and triad- 
ins-- invigorate tho ie;ht a- one goes 
to In- work each day, lifting up his 

sense i.f his work until he sees it in 

I lie I ie ht of divine sen ice. Then he 
will love to work and work t i love. 

II i; not sn much new jobs that ate 
needed, us new views of the old ones; 
nol so much a change of environment, 
as a change of viewpoint. "(1 sine; 
unto the Lord a new song," cried the 
Psalmist, II" who sinus in his heart 
a new song of purpose and thanksgiv- 
ing as he works, joins in the over- 
ture of the angels, and everything he 
touches shines in the sunlight of in- 
spirat ion. 

Smallness is expressed in sugges- 
tions that lead t i the contemplation 
of trifles instead of the bigness and 
beauty of food. Smallness is ex- 
pressed in all that is ingrowing, in- 
stead of outpouring; in that which is 
self centered instead of humanity- 
eonti red. He who is living in cramped 
spaces of thought, dwelling upon and 
talking about what someone else is 
doing or is not doing, needs to break 
through his finite boundaries, to think 
in terms broader than hemispheres. 
Kvery moment of the day our think- 
ing is either shrinking or expanding. 
How we need expansion! 

Sourness, bitterness, hatefulness, if 
not overcome, crush out the very es- 
sence of health and life. John real- 
ized this when he wrote, "We know 
that we have passed from death unto 
life, because we 1 >ve the brethren." 
He who passes from the deadness of 
hate into the vitalizing compassion of 
love ii r mankind is touching the Life 
that is Cod. We live only as we un- 
selfishly love. Life i.- mt too sdiort 
for hate, but too sublime, 

Speaking of a certain eminent 
state-man, a morning newspaper 
wrote, "He will he aide, through his 
Christian character to overcome sug- 
gestive mesmerism." The race needs 
and hmes to rise superior to stmws- 
tive mesmerism, Christian Science 
has com- to teach us that God is e-iv- 
iiiK man. thtough the impartation of 
His own thoughts, or antjel messages, 
tlie ability and inspiration to master 
victoriously the mesmerism which 
would hinder his htrrhest endeavor. 

If we are stumbling in the valley 
roa-l of depressed and unworthy 
Hi >llght, we are hut listening to un- 
real, mesmeric suggestions. If we 
me steadfastly climbing th • mountain 
path of inspired and prmrr >ssive con- 
pciovsness, we are making friends 
with angels, our Father's thoughts. 

It is a mighty fact that each time 
an evil suggestion seems t > sneak, an 
nnir< ' a message from God— is at the 
('nor ' f thought to countoraet and de- 
stroy it. Jesus proved th's in tho wil- 
d rress when the devil of suggestion, 
trying to turn him from his holy mis- 
s'on of healing and purifying man- 
i ind, showed him all the kingdoms of 
the world and the glory of them. and. 
said unto him "All thes» things will 
1 give thee, if thou wilt fall down and 
wot hip me." In the majesty of un- 
rurpassed consecration Jesus replied, 
"Get thee hence. Satan: for it is writ- 
ten, Thou shalt worship the Lord thy 
God, and him only shalt thou serve. 
'Then the devil leaveth him, and. he- 
boid, angels came and ministered unto 
hhn " What irresistible armor has the 
man who can say in his heart. "Htm 
only shalt thou serve"! To such the 
angels forever minister, These angel 
thoughts from God are his compan- 
ions, and by them he is enlarged, en- 
lightened enriched, and encircled. 
HUMAN WILL 

Anion r the many errors of thought 
that dull one's hearing to the angel 
messages none is more pronounced 
than human will with all its resistance 
and strong opinions. This element of 
the human mind responds easily to 
aggressive evil suggestions. To want 
one's own way at home, in business, 
or in one's church is to dose th> shut- 



ters of tht 



window through which 



God's sunlight pours. Jesns, wh ■ 
obeyed exactly the rules of life's di- 
vine Principle, said at the hour be- 
ftve his crucifixion. "Not m\ will, but 
thine, be done." "And," it is written. 



"there appeared an angel unto him 
from heaven, strengthening him." 
Each time our human sense of will 
falls at the feet of Love's sweet will, 
an angel of inspiration strengthens us. 

THE DISCOVERER OF CHRISTIAN 
SCIENCE 

Christian Science was discovered 
and founded by a woman, made spir- 
itually n ady for such a holy trust by 
lessons learned from every event of 
her life, by human struggles, desper- 
ate privations, heroic overcomings, 
an 1 deepest longings to know and 
to take the things of God an 1 jtive 
them to mankind. Some people live 
for a few, some for many, hut Mary 
Maker Eddy actually thought, prayed, 
and lived for all mankind. In an hour 
when she was in the valley of the 
shadow of death, she lifted her heart 
t'> God and tinned as she had done 
since childhood to her Bible for help. 
With such spiritual readiness and pur- 
ity of vision did she read its pages 
that lo, she touched, as did the woman 
of old, the garment's hem and through I 
the power- of the same Christ, she j 
rose confidently and walked. Now she ] 
beheld through the lens of Spirit the | 
universe of God in all its perfection 
and glory. Now she felt the operation j 
of the law she had not known before, I 

- the healing, purifying, saving law I 
of God. As soon as she could find her 
way in this new universe of light her 
heart, so aglow w ith divine Love, was | 
flooded with compassion for all those I 
bewildered and hound by sin and pain, j 
For their sakes she must know the 
divine Principle on which her marvel- j 
i. ns healing was based, so that they 
too could dlop their fetters at the 

feet of Christ. With th:s one star 
leading her on she withdrew from so- 
ciety with the Bible for her textbook. 
Hire in the seclusion of prayer, she 
studied and worked for three years, 
learning in childlike simplicity from 
prophets and apostles. Through spir- 
itual inspiration Mrs. Eddy received 
and reci rded the revelation of scienti- 
fic Christianity as it unfolded to her 
consecral ed, Love-inspired conscious- 
ness. Of herself she has said that she 
was a "scribe under orders" Miscel- 
laneous Writings, p. 311). The spir- 
itual, undeviating, indestructible facts 
of Truth that, appeared to her God- 
prepared heart at that time, she eluci- 
date I in words known a> the Christian 
Science textbook, "Science and Health 
with Ki y to the Scriptures." — a book 
that is waking men of every nation 
from the midnight of despair to be- 
hold the morning light of hope and 
holier living. Her reason for writing 
this hook she makes plain in these 
words which appear in court records: 
"I turned to God in prayer and said. 
Just guide me to the Mind which was 
also in Christ, and 1 took the Bible 
and opened t i the words, 'Now go 
w rite it in a hook.' I then commenced 
writing my consciousness of what I 
bad seen and I found that human will 
was the cause of disease instead of 
its cure; that the divine Mind was 
th • heal >r." Thus was made and giv- 
en to mankind the discovery which has 
shaken the very foundation of mate- 
rial systems and .awakened thought to 
realize that Spirit and the things of 
Spirit are real, vital, operative, pres- 
ent, and, available to men. 

I have heard Mrs. Eddy speak many 
times. Her words live in memory as 
holy messages from God. She abode 
with angels,— God's sublime thoughts, 

- and brought them close to those who 
beard her. 

I love to tell of the time when Mrs. 
Eddy arranged for a group of Scien- 
tists, of whom I was one, to go 
through her home in Concord, New 
Hampshire, while she was out driving. 
As the one in charge of the house took 
us about, we came to Mrs. Eddy's 
sleening room. Over her bed I noticed 
a slip of paper on which something 
was written, in her handwriting. 1 
asked if I might read it and was given 
i emission. What volumes I found in 
this simple stanza: 

"When others hate, oppose, Itrnore. 

11, Or me, dear Lord, t.. love them mm','. 

In prayerful silence I went over to 
her window, and looking out upon the 
bills so precious to our Leader, I re- 
peated again and again: 

"When others hate, oppose, htnore, 

Help me. dear Lord, t.> love them more. 

She who had given herself to show 
I efogged humanity the way of escape 
from sin and torture had been hated, 
opposed, and ignored by the world that 
knew her not, that could not under- 
stand her devotion and prayers; but 
despite it all her heart grew ever more 
aglow with love. As I stood there I 
t bought of how she had given back 
kindness for every hate, forgiveness 
for every cruelty; in fact, had loved 
more than anyone since the days of 
Jesus; and vet had written these lines 
and placed than over her bed to re- 
mind her still to love more. As 1 
thought of it all I felt a heavenly 
baptism of Love, for now I could see 
a new and deeper meaning in the line 
from her hymn (Poems, p. 4) ; "Wait, 
and l ive more for every bate. Why, 
1 thought, it is a definite, positive rule 
fc action; a rule that must be obeyed 
bv all who would understand real Life. 
No one who is not a humanity helper, 
a world thinker and worker, who does 
not live to draw from God and give to 
man through selfless service, is truly 
a followe r of Mary Baker Eddy. 
PETER'S ESCAPE FROM PRISON 

In \cts it is written that Herod 0f- 
pressed certain of the church, casting 
Peter into prison. At night, as. bound 
hv chains, he slept between two sol- 
die s an angel, an impartation from 
Spirit, came to his thought birhting 
the prison with the revelation of God s 
power. The angel spoke to Peter, 
-eying in the words of Scripture. 
"A'ris^ up quickly. And his chains 
fell off from his hands. . . . And he 
<a:th unto him. Cast thy garment 
'bout thee, and follow me. . . . When 
thev were past the first and the see- 
on f ward, thev came unto the iron 
eate that leadeth unto the city; which 
opened to them of his 'own accord. 

And when Peter was come to 
himself he said. Now I know of a 
surety, that the Lord hath sent his an- 
;v\ and hath delivered me." 

P. ter's experience illustrates th 
-ower of the saving law of Almighty 
tied which operates instantly an.' 
constantly in b"half of man in ever 
»ge Chr ; stian Science, the amrelic 
message, enters the mental prisons 



where men are bound in chains of 
temptation and torment and lights the 
prisons with the glory of divine Love. 
It says to earth-burdened prisoners, 
sentenced by common opinion and not 
by the decree of God, "Cast thy gar- 
ments of hope about thee and follow 
me." This scientific Christianity with 
its holy influx from God leads the 
prisoners forth through the gate of 
opportunity into the city of spiritual 
understanding and freedom. Thou- 
sands, who, like myself, have been so 
liberated, are saying as did Peter, 
"Now I know of a surety, that God 
hath sent his angel, and hath delivered 
me." 

SALVATION 

John wrote, "I saw another angel 
come down from heaven, having great 
power; and the eaith was lightened 
with his glory." Each exalted thought 
is an angel from heaven, and our 
earth, our human experience, is light- 
ened with its glory. To dwell in the 
radiance of spiritual consciousness 
w here angels are heard, we must sep- 
arate all evil from our thought of 
man. If man is God's image, — and he 
is, — then that whic!1 misrepresents 
and misjudges, that which is jealous 
and envious and hateful, is not man 
at all hut mi rely a false Concept, — 
the veil. He who knows this divine 
fact will be able to look through the 
veil of matetiality and see his brothei 
at all times as he is, shining in the 
light of God-likeness, unspotted and 
untouched by sin. There will be no 
unhappy nor disrupted homes or brok- 
en friendships when the earth is light- 
ened with the glory of this angel idea. 
Separating error from our sense of 
man is a vital part of working out 
our own salvation and of helping oth- 
ers to work out theirs. We cannot he 
saved from pain, restlessness, or sin 
until we begin to sec ourselves divine- 
ly, in the purity of God-likeness, and 
express this selfhood. It is impossi- 
ble to know ourselves aright unless we 
are striving with all our hearts to 
recognize our brothers as God Bees 
them. 

I was put to this test one day when 
a maid in our home admitted an in- 
toxicated man who came to beg. When 
she told me what she had done I 
went into the library and found a 
young man in a drunken sleep. My 
first thought was to telephone to the 
police and have him removed. Then 
1 thought, I will see if I cannot rouse 
him. I shook his arm and said, 
"Awake, you are a son of God and 
can act as one." He opened his eyes 
and asked in a dazed way what I had 
said. I repeated, "You are a son of 
(iod and can act as one." Patheti- 
cally he .-aid. "You are the tirst one 
thai ever called me anything but a 
sinner. I have a wife and three chil- 
dren but they have left me because 
I'm .a sinner." I stood by his chair 
and told him again and again that 
tied made him in His own likeness, 
which means like Him in character, 
moral strength, and purity, and that 
the veil of materiality that was cov- 
ering him was the sinner and could 
be torn away, and then his true self 
would come to light. As the idea of 
his spiritual sonship with (iod broke 
upon this man's thought a changed 
expression came over his face anil he 
began to repeat, "I am a son of God 
and can act as one." At this moment 
he touched the robe of the saving 
Christ and his purification began. An 
angel had come down from heaven 
and the earth was lighted with his 
glory. I did not offer this man a 
Christian Science treatment, but I 
gave him some Christian Science liter- 
ature and he went away. Through it 
he was cleansed and was reunited with 
his family. The angel thought that 
came to him that day awakened him 
to recognize his sonship with God and 
be followed it through the gate of op- 
portunity into the city of the redeemed 
of God. Through the same gate each 
man may pass to know his spiritual 
sonship and behold the redemption of 
divine Love. Yes, each one. Not one 
need wait outside in weary condemna- 
tion, or pierced with pain. 

It is a mighty fact that the gates 
of opportunity are flung wide for all 
to enter and behold the grandeur and 
glory of Life stretching out before us 
in an eternity of boundless good, and 
find man's place in the presence of 
our God, ho'-o to understand and fol- 
low his Father's holy messages. In 
God's hallowed now, in heaven's gold- 
en light of divine possibilities and par- 
dons, we hear the angels whisper 
"Blessed are they that do his com- 
mandments, that they may have right 
to the tree of life, and may enter in 
through the gates into the city." 

As we think of it all we lift up our 
hearts as did our Leader, and in her 
words we pray (Miscellany, p. 354), 
"Give us m>t only Biurets' sum?--. 

Hut Science vast, to which ticlontrs 
Th- toneue of angels 
And the song of songs.' 



MELROSE GIRLS BEAT WINCHES- 
TER 



Ineligibility of One of Its Players De- 
prived Winners of Right to 
Play for Title 



While Melrose High School girls' 
field hockey team defeated Winchester, 
2 to 1, in the playoff for the cham- 
pionship of the Northern Division of 
the Interscholastic League, last Fri- 
day afternoon at Lasell Field, Auburn- 
dale, the victory did not entitle the 
winners to meet Arlington for tin- 
Greater Boston title. After the game 
it was found that one of the Melrose 
girls has been ineligible to play hock- 
ey all year, according to the Melrose 
scholastic regulation which stipulates 
the completion of 18 hours scholastic 
work to be eligible for athletic com- 
petition. 

Since the rule is not an interscho- 
lastic one Principal Grindle tried, but 
without success, to persuade the Mel- 
rose authorities to permit the win to 
stand, and the local girls, while wel- 
coming the shot at the big crown, re- 
gretted the hard luck which deprived 
Meln se of its chance at the cham- 
pionship. 

In two games Melrose held Win- 
chester to a scoreless tie and won the 
second meeting, appearing just a bit 
better than Winchester as the latter 
has been going lately. 

During the first half of last Fri- 
day's game the teams fought on pret- 
ty much even terms, and though Mel- 
rose scored two goals to Winchester's 
one, the locals had fully as many scor- 
ing opportunities as their opponents. 
Winchester might have won had the 
Red and Black capitalized its chances, 
but a decided lack of team work pre- 
vented the local girls' offense from 
clicking. 

Eleanor Fillmore, Melrose center 
forward, broke the ice with a clean 
shot from the center of the striking 
circle which got by "Kayo" Peepers. 
Soon after Janet Nichols made it all 
even when she took the ball at middle 
field and dribbled all the way up the 
alley to shoot past Coaler Davidson. 

The last Melrose goal came as the 
result of a break and the winner's 
ability to make the most of a scoring 
chance. Doris Gilley, Melrose right 
inner, took the ball up the field and 
into the striking circle where she 
launched a shot at Goaler Keepers. 
The latter took the shot on her stick, 
but in deflecting, the ball struck the 
goal upright and bounded straight 
back into the field of play, Evelyn 
Smith, left inner for Melrose, was 
"Johnnie-on-the-spot" and hanged the 
ball into the net for the winning goal. 

After the intermission the Winch 
tor team seemed to lose much of its 
tight, and never seriously threatened, 
though the locals did prevent any fur- 
ther Melrose scoring. 

The winners played by far the bet- 
ter combination game throughout the 
afternoon. Winchester apparently be- 
ing content to pass the ball to its star 
wing, Janet Nichols, who was literally 
run ragged before the final whistle. 
Captain Carolyn Nichols played a 



strong defensive game for Winchester 
and Melrose might well have run up 
a larger score, had it not been for her 
clever work. 

The summary: 
MELROSE WINCHESTER 

HaeOonald, lw rw, Williams 

rw, Abbott 

Smith. Ii ri. Km.lrick 

Filmore. cf cf. 1'olnm! 

Glllcy, ri Ii, Little 

M.l.w. rw Iw. J NichoU 

Ha nitran, rw 

Johnson, !hl> rhh. Tompkins 

Colbert. chl> chb. Carleton 

Rcnrdon, rh!> ihl>. i'. Nichols 

Tibbetts, lti» rfb, Kin* 

rfb, Thompson 

War,), rfb lfi,. Shaw 

Davidson, g K , Keepen 

k*. Fowls 

Scon- Melrose 2, Winchester l. Goals 
Smith. Fil more, J. Nichols. Umpires Kay 
Townaend and J. Hairy. 



W. C. T. I . NOTES 



- 1 



The November meeting of the local 
Union was held at the home of Mrs 
Gei rge Arnold. Twenty-four comfort 
bags for the Sailors' Department 
were made at the forenoon session. 
At the close of the business meeting 
reports from the State convention 
were given by Miss Blanche Free- 
man, Miss Eugenia Elliott and Mrs. 
Emma Nickerson. The president 
stated that we have no need to feel 
discouraged over the outcome of the 
recent election. One battle lost is 
not the whole war and ultimately we 
•dial! win. The air has been full of 
forebodings and the newspapers full 
of wet boasting. Hut the fact i< that 
when our representatives m Wash- 
ington discuss prohibition it is not as 
a party issue hut as a social welfare 
measure and the discussions and 
votes are non-partisan. Considering 
the subject, then, with no thought of 
party victories or defeats, just what 
did happen to prohibition on Nov. 1? 
United States Senate Holds Fast 
Out of 36 Senators elected for 
short or long terms, ail but live are 
dry. 

Dry Losses in the House 
The probable total of gain for the 
wets in the House will be around d. 
just one half of the number claimed 
by the opposition before election. 
Considering the great turmoil, the 
off-year and the extensive financing 
by the enemies of prohibition, it is 
surprising that they were able to 
pick up recruits only by ones and 
twos in states with large dry dele- 
gations. The accepted ratio of wets 
and drys in the Congress since 1928 



has been TO drys to 20 wets in the 
Senate and 32i> drys to lOti wets in 
the House. Conceding the gain of 
wets in the House to be 35, the ratio 
in the new Congress, which meets 
in regular session December 1931, 
wall be 292 drys to 143 wets. The 
drys still will have a very safe ma- 
jority—enough to defeat "any repeal 
or modification measures. 

The election is over, but the men 
who have been successful at the polls 
keep their ears to the ground for 
popular sentiment in their home dis- 
tricts. The "working for prohibition 
where you are" will do more to off- 
set state ci ntrol and repeal doctrine 
and will do more to help friends of 
prohibition in Congress to stand 
loyal than any thine else. It is a 
, time when individual.- who believe in 
prohibition should lend aid to every 
effort to increase law observance and 
should at tht- same time let all politi- 
cal parties and all elected officials 
know that they expect and demand 
successful enforcement of the present 
laws. 



WINCHESTER BOAT CLUB 

The dance bold a t the Calumet 
Club last Friday evening was a suc- 
cess financially, but numerically it 
left, more to be hoped for! Twenty- 
eight couples enjoyed a pleasant 
party. The hall was attractive in a 
rose colored atmosphere produced by 
many small lights, shaded in various 
tints of red, The result was a sub- 
dued tone which was very easy on 
i he eyesight. "Ed's" harmony boys 
furnished the music an I it sure was 
snappy. Calumet Club members, 
who were expected to bo present and 
thus make it a joint dance, were con- 
spicuous by their absence, in fact, 
not oiio was on hand. nf course, 
Friday, is no doubt the busiest even- 
ing of the week, and it was also the 
night before the Harvard Vale 
•.■.•mi . so there may be good reason 
f( r the total absence of Calumeters. 
On account of conflicting dates, Dec. 
l:» C the next possibility and on that 
evening we will conduct another 
party, 

The Fire Department was called 
at 0:12 Monday morning by an alarm 
from Box 521 to put out a fire in the 
basement of Mr. I'. F. Avery's resi- 
dence at 19 Sheffield west, the fin-, 
which was caused by an over-heated 
electric iron, did little damage. 



Money to Loan and Vicinty 



f AT 



On one and two-family houses preferred. Owner 
and occupant preferred. Applications now being 
taken for loans- not over $8000 to on,, borrower, 
Money advanced to build. Call personally with 
Deed. 



6% 



MERCHANTS Co operative Bank 

24 School Street, Boston, Mass. 



Assets over 830,000.000 



o24-18t 




THE NEW CHEVROLET SIX 
HAS MANY IMPROVEMENTS 



ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK 
USES RECORDAK SYSTEM 



Winchester people, who are custom- 
ers of the Atlantic National Rank of 
Boston, have the protection of Reeord- 
ak, the new system of photographing 
checks. A negative is made of every 
check drawn on the bank by its de- 
positors. If payment by check is ever 
contested and the cancelled check is 
not available, the depositor may have 
a reproduction made of the cancelled 
check in question to offer as proof of 
payment. This is only one of the many 
features of Atlantic National Bank 
service. 

Two of the bank's offices are par- 
ticularly convenient for those using 
the North Station. The Canal street 
office. OS Canal street, is directly on 
the way in town, while the office at III 
Tremont street between West street 
and Temple place, is ideally located 
for women who do their buying at 
Roston's big downtown department 
stores. 

The Atlantic National Rank of Bos 
ton is glad to serve Winchester v >- 
pie at whichever of their offices is most 
convenient. — Advertisement. 



CHEVROLCTA 



T The introduction of 
the new Chevrolet 
Six marks the most 



impressive forward step in Chev- 
rolet's twenty-year record of eon- 
stunt progress ami improvement. 
For this Digger and Better Six 
offers new beauty, new luxury, 
new eompleteness ami new qual- 
ity — yet it sells at lower prices! 

The improvements in the new 
Chevrolet Six hegin at the smart 
new chrome-plated headlamps 
ami extend throughout the entire 
ear. The radiator is deeper and 
unusually efficient* Due to the 
increased wheelhase, the lines 
are longer and lower, giving an 
air of exceptional fleetneaa and 
praee. And the new Fisher hodies 



combine with this more attrac- 
tive exterior appearance, a new 
degree of interior luxury. 

The chassis of the new Chevrolet 
Six has also heen refined and 
advanced in a number of different 
ways. The frame is heavier und 
deeper. There is a smoother oper- 
ating, long lived clutch; a sturdier 
front axle; an entirely new steer- 
ing mechanism; an easier shift ing 
transmission. 

Ami along with these improve- 
ments. Chevrolet otters a 30- 
horsepower, six-cylinder motor- 
four long semi-elliptic springs 

— four hydraulic shock ahsorhcrs 

— a safety gasoline tank — and 
an economy of operation not sur- 
passed by any automohilc. 



AT NEW LOW PRICES « 



The 

Phaeton 



The 

Roadster 



Sport Roadster 
with rumble seat 



'510 
'475 
495 



The 
Coach 



Standard 
Coupe . . . 



Standard Five- 
Window Coupe 



'545 
'535 
$ 545 



Sport Coupe 
with rumble seat 

Standard 

Sedan 



Sperial 
Sedan 



»575 
'635 
'650 





Byrd Pictures. Winchester Town 
Hall, Saturday, Dec. 6. Two shows. 3 
p. m.. tickets" 10c and 20c; 8 p. m., 
tickets 50c. Glee Club in evening. 
Tickets of Mrs. Cleaves, tel. Win. 
1121. Wadleigh Parent Teacher As- 
sociation. 



S PECIAL EQUIPMENT EXTRA 

Chevrolet Trurks from $.155 to $693 
All price* f. o. b. Flint. Mirhigan 



mi v icoi i i 



IT'S WISE TO CHOOSE A SIX 



FRANK MURPHY, Inc. 



748 MAIN STREET 



TEL. WIN. 0298 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS. , STAR, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1930 



11 



■bbs 



John J. Murphy, Dealer in Junk of 
All Kinds. Highest pricet paid. If 
you have anything in this line, tele- 
phone either Winchester 0«J24, 0824-W 
or drop a postal to 28 Churct street. 

mhO-tf 



A Cambridge Institution 



ENGAGEMENT OF MISS SHER- 
MAN ANNOUNCED 



University 
- Theatre 

Harvard Square. Cambridg e, Mm 

Now flaying 
Jeanette MarUonald in 

"MONTE CARLO" 
Richard A rim in 
"THE SEA tiOII" 

Sun. M«n. Tues. Wad. 
Nov. 30. Dec. I, 2, .i 
JOHN HARRYMORE in 

"MOBY DICK" 

Wheeler and Woolsey 
"HALF SHOT AT 
SUNRISE" 

Thurs. Kri. Sat. 

"THE SPOILERS" 

GARY COOPER 

"MAYBE IT'S LOVE" 
Joan Bennett and 
Joe E. Hronn 

Continuous 2 i * 



Mrs. Roland H. Sherman of 14 
Everett avenue, announces the en- 
gagement of her daughter, Miss 
Nancy Sherman to Mr. Homer T. 
Craig Jr., son of Dr. and Mrs. Homer 
T. Craig of San Francisco, Calif. 



Fancy paper napkins, tor bridges 
and luncheons, at the STAR office. 

~ WINCHESTER NATIONAL BANK 



In compliance with the requirements of 
Chapter .WO, Section 40. Acts of 1908, as 
amended l>y Chapter 491, Section «. Acta of 
180B, and by Chapter 171, Section I, Acts of 
1912, notice is hereby given of the loss of 
pais- book No. lbOl. 

E. M. NELSON. Cashier 

n2H-3t 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the sub- 
scribers have been duly appointed executors of 
the will of Alice Helen I'ratt late of Winches- 
ter in the County of Middlesex, Mass. deceased, 
testate, and have taken ui»on themselves that 
I trust by giving bond, as the law directs. 

All persons having demands upon the es- 
tate of said deceased are hereby required Ui 
exhibit the same; and all persona Indebted to 
saiil estate are called upon to make payment 

ELMER D. FLETCHER 
(.'HAS. H. PRATT 

Exeeutora 

(Addreaa) 
] 20 (ieorite St.. Somerville. Mass. 
s l.aKranxc St., Winchester Mass. 

November K. 1980 nH-3t 



STON E HAM 



Mat. 2:15 



Eve. 7:45 



Sat. 6:15, 8 ::i0 



Sun. .1 P. M. 



Friday, Nov. 28 

Clara Bow and Stanley Smith in 
"LOVE AMONG MILLIONAIRES" 
Belle Bennett in "COURAGE" 



Linenware Friday 



Saturday, Nov. L".t 
Regis Toomey in "CRAZY THAT WAY" 
Bob Steele in "NEAR THE RAINBOW END" 

KIN-TIN [-TIN in "LONE DEFENDER"— Matinee Only 



Sunday and Monday, Nov. 30, Dec. 1 

Claudia Dell and Earnest Torrence in 
"SWEET KITTY BELLAIRS" 

All Star Cast in "SWING HIGH" 

Beautyware Monday 



Tuesday and Wednesday, Dec 2, 'i 
Joan Crawford in "OUR BLUSHING BRIDES" 
Aileen Pringle and Grant Withers in 
"SOLDIERS AND WOMEN" 



Thursday and Friday, Dec. 4, r> 
John McCormack and Maureen O'Sullivan in 
"SONG 0' MY HEART" 
Joyce Compton, June Collyer and Louise Dresser in 
"THE THREE SISTERS" 



Calendar pads at the Star Office. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

IL. S.) 

WHEREAS, at a meet ins of the County 
Commissioners for said County, at Lowell on 
the first Tuesday of September A. U. 1!*30. 

ON THE 1'ETiTION of the Selectmen of 
Winchester, praying for the relocation of High 
Street, beginning at a point nearly opposite 
its junction with Arlington Street, thence 
westerly for a distance of about 1000 feet ; 
also for the relocation of Main Street from 
its junction with Highland Avenue north- 
westerly of the Medforil line: thence north- 
westerly past its junction with Bacon and 
Grove Streets to its junction with Madison 
Avenue, it was adjudged that said relocation 
of Main Street is of common convenience 
and necessity : 

Said Commissioners therefore give notice 
that they will meet at Commissioners' Office, 
Court House, in Cambridge on the twelfth day 
of December A. D, la3U, at ten o'clock in the 
forenoon, to rehx-ate accordingly. 

CHARLES T. HUGHES, 
Asst. Clerk 

November ". I'j:i0 
A true copy, 

Attest: Henry L. Walker. Deputy Sherilf 

nl4-;it 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHI'SETTS 

MIDDLESEX. SS. PROBATE COURT 

To the heirs-at-law. next or kin and all 
other persons interested in the estate of 
Charles U Mitchell late of Winchester in said 
County, deceased, 

WHEREAS, a certain instrument purport- 
ing to be the last will ami testament of said 
deceased has been presented to said Court, 
for probate, by The Boston Safe Deposit and 
Trust Company and Chauncey I.. Mitchell 
who pray that letters testamentary may be 
issued to them, the executors therein named, 
without giving a surety on their official bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a Pro- 
bate Court to be held at Cambridge in said 
County of Middlesex, on the first day of De- 
cember A. 1>. 1930, at ten o'clock in the [ore- 
noon, to show cause, if any you have, why 
the same should not he granted. 

Anil said petitioners are hereby directed to 
give public notice thereof, by publishing this 
citation once in each week, for three succes- 
sive weeks, in The Winchester Star a news- 
paper published in Winchester the last pub- 
lication to lie on,, day, at least, before said 
Court, and by mailing, post-paid, or deliver- 
ing a copy of this citation to all known per- 
sons interested in the estate, seven days at 
least before said Court. 

Witness. JOHN C. LEOGAT, EsQUire, First 
Judge of said Court, this thirteenth day of 
November in the year one thousand nine hun- 
die.l ami thirty. 

LORING r. JORDAN, Register 

11 14-3t 



See the new initial stationary, in 
attractive color combinations, 35c a 
folder, 3 folders for SI at the Star 
Office. 



liy virtue and in execution of the power of 
j sale contained in a certain mortgage Ueeu 
j given by Charles Bruce to James ot..- siraonua 
i oated March ji, igxtt, being Document No. 
j uo.oo,, registereu April it), i'.'-y, and noted 
on Certificate ot .w o.,_„ ui uegattra- 

Hon uook. a, fuge „ u . , in tne Miuulesex 

South Registry losUh-i, ... ... ..o.. .. 

conditions contained in said mortgage and 
ivf toe purpose >.. ivl'«.s4u**»g U»« »«M4tf, wul 
be sold at public gucUou on toe premises 
hereinafter describes on aiuituay tne uiteeutn 
day of December, A. D. I'.MO, ut tour o does 
in the aiteruoon, ail aim »iogutar uie prem- 
ises in said mortgage described as follows, 
to wit: -a certain pM*uei o, .a.,,. vv.uvii,.-- 
ler, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, shown 
as Lot numbered 'JV on pian entitled "vvood- 
oide, VV inchest, r, Mass, subdivision of Lota 
••- *" Land Court case .m>:, i arser Jlol- 
uiook, engineer, oated April jo. i bled 
with the Land Registration Office, a copy of 
wnicn is bleu wiu, ute ouuui tv^*L»Uj «j,«vrici 
lor Middlesex County, bounded aim described 
as follow*, vis:- Southwesterly, vtetgeriy and 
Northerly by Woodside Road and Wickiord 

iCoad by luur lneaMuieiu^.tu 

i«o 119.51 j feet, Eighty-two and 61 loo 
lox.mi Let, One hundred six and 29/ 100 

liOb.JJI teel aim io.,.i,.o al... t'J »vU i. ..-».'» 

leet respectively; easterly by tne Lot No. 
One Hundred (100) as shown on said plan 
one liuliuieu o... i.u.i , u i; . ouui.r.y oy 
the Lot No. ",J as shown on said plan One 
hundred fourteen a. .a *u luo (ii4.*UJ teet, 

and containing i-,..,. i, . Jxx . ... 

the zoning law requirements oi the Town of 
»» inchest* i . 

Said premises will be sold subject to all 
unpaid taxes ..mi municipal liens u any there 
be. j:)oo will be required to be paid by the 
purchaser at the time and place ot sale; other 
terms at sale. 

tor further particulars apply to Dallinger 
Ji Stearns, attorneys, S'J State St., boston, 
Mass, 

JAMES OTIS Sl.MONDS. Mortgagee 




CALUMET NOTES 



TO THE PARENTS AND <il \Ul>- 
1ANS OF Hli, 11 SCHOOL 
PUPILS 



Calumet will meet the Medford 
; Club in the Mystic' Valley League 
next Monday evening at the home 
club house. 

Mrs. Harris S. Richardson is in 
j charge of the coming afternoon bridge 
! for the ladies. This party will be 
; he'd next Tuesday afternoon at ^ 



On Tuesday evening, Dec. 2 at 8 p_ 
m. in the high school assembly hall, 
the Parent-Teacher Association meets 
lor the second time this year. A pro- 
gram has been arranged which well 
meiUs the attention of all whose 
children are among the large student 
body of the school. 

Dr. Albert H. Gage, of WakeBeld, 
will address the meeting on the sub- 
ject. "Through the Eyes of Youth." 
I>r. Cage recently spoke before the 
Parent-Teacher Association of the 
Wadleigh School. His message was 



o'clock 

The 'afternoon bowling party for 8 tn ? ,e ty ot }* and was enthusiastically 
the ladies on Tuesday last brought | received. He has something to tell 



that none of us should miss. 

In order that each of our meetings 
may present some one of the many 
school activities, the high school or- 
chestra will be present to furnish a 
number of musical arrangements. It 
is always an inspiration to see the 



MEDFORD THEATER 

Mat. 2:00 Eve. 7:00 

( all Mystic 1800 For Reserve Seats 



Now Playing 

"Good News" 

with BESSIE LOVE. MARY LAWL0R and STANLEY SMITH 
JACK HOLT and DAVY LEE in 



"Squealer" 



CAPITOL 

ARLINGTON 
Massachusetts Avenue at Lake Street 



Now Playing 
Nancy Carroll and Buddy Rogers in 
"FOLLOW THRU" 
ami 

Rin Tin Tin in 
"ROUGH WATERS" 

Mon. Tues. Weil., Doe. 1. 2. ;i 

BESSIE LOVE and 
STANLEY SMITH in 

"GOOD NEWS" 

Richard Dix in 
"SHOOTIM, STRAIGHT" 



Thurs. I'ri. Sat.. Dee. 1. 6, 0 
JOHN HcCORMACK in 

"SONG 0' MY HEART" 

Hunter Keatnn in 
"DOUGH HOYS" 

Dec. H. '.). 10 
"OLD ENGLISH" 
and 

"QUEEN HIGH" 



Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 
Nov. 30, Dec. 1, 2, :i 

CLARA BOW in 

"Her Wedding Night" 

RAYMON NAVARRO in 

"Call of The Flesh" 



COMEDY 



NEWS 



E. M. LOEWS 

Regent 

ARLINGTON 

7 WEDFORD ST. TEL. 1197 

Matinees si 2— Evenings at 7:3U 
Saturdays and Holidays Continuous 
1 iSO to 10 :.H) 

Now Playing 
NEIL HAMILTON and 
DOROTHY SEBASTIAN in 

"Ladies Must Play" 

HOOT GIBSON in 

"Trigger Tricks" 

KNUTE ROCKNE'S "FLYING FEET" 
SATl'RDAY NITK VODVIL 



Monday, Tuesday, Dir. 1. 2 

LEWIS STONE in 

'Strictly Unconventional" 
"3 Sisters" 



Wednesday — Dresserwsrr Nits 

Wednesday, Thursday. Doe 3, 4 

RUTH CHATTERTON in 
"A Lady of Scandal" 
HOD LaROCQUE in 
"Beau Bandit" 



out the largest attendance of any of 

tnese popular parties thus far this 

season. A ni. 'St enjoyable afternoon 

was spent on the alleys. The follow- 

: tne ladies were prize winners: 

i High Single- Mis. Cox with ins. 

| High single with handicap Mrs. French 

with 129. students in action. This oart of the 

> High two-string total Mrs LI. In with . g £ « PJ« Ot^the 

| High total "ith handicap Mrs. Boothby while. 

j with . , , , * The committees in charge of mem- 

The next afternoon of bowling for bcrship and entertainment will leave 

the ladies will occur on I aesday, Dec. nothing undone to make our second 

9 at 2 o'clock. meeting of the year a complete suc- 

i' ss. Refreshments will be served. 

Back Gammon sets at the STAR An opportunity will be afforded for 

parents and teachers to meet that 



office. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT, Office of the 
SuiK.-rvi.-nn; Architect, Washington, D. C, No- 
vember 13, ls«;tu. Sealed bids will be opened 

in tins office, room laii, at 2 p. m., December 
4. I'.i.w, for painting plaster i>.< the U. S. 
post office at Winchester, Mass. Specifications 
may be obtained from the custodian of the 
building, or at this office in the dis- 
cretion of the supervising architect. Jas. A. 
Wetmore, Acting Supervising Architect, 



14. Ml 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LAND COURT 

To the Bay State Mortgage Corporation and 
| The Prudential Life Insurance Company, duly 
| existing corporations having usual places of 
I business ill Huston, in the County of SlllTolU. 
| anil said Commonwealth : Forrest N. Adams. 

Thomas B. Cotter and Augustus C. Jordan. 

of said Boston ; Marion H. Young. Isaac K. 

Sexton, Nellie R Sexton. Roger Uilliniis. and 

Dorothy HiIIiuks. of Winchester, Edwin K. 

Blaikie, William K. Blaikie, Man S. Bloikie, 



Winchester, Mass., Nov. 1, litllO 
To the Middlesex County Commissioners: 

Respectfully represent the undersigned, in- 
habitants of the town of Winchester, in said 
County, that High Street, in said Winchester, 
should be relocated and specifically repaired. 

Wherefore, we pray that you will relocate 
said llitth Street and direct specific repairs 
thereon. 

HARRY W. STEVENS 
and four others. 
COMMONWEALTH <iK MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

At a meeting of the County Commissioners 
for the County of Middlesex, at Lowell, in 
-aid County, on the first Tuesday of Septem- 
ber, in the year of our Lord one thousand 
nine hundred and thirty, to wit, by adjourn- 
ment at Cambridge in said County, on the 
seventh day of November, A. D. 1930. 

ON the foregoing petition. Ordered, that 
the Sheriff of said County, or his Deputy wive 
notice to all persons and corporations inter- 
■ -titl therein, that said Commissioners will 
meet for the purpose of viewing the premises 
and hearing the parties at the Commissioners' 
Office. Court House, Cambridge in said Coun- 
ty, "n Friday the twelfth day of December. 
A. H 1880, at ten of the clock in the fore- 
rumn, by serving the Clerk of the town of 
Winchester, with n copy of said petition and 
of this order thereon, thirty days at least he- 
fore said view, and by publishing the same 
in the Winchester Star a newspaper printed 
at Winchester, three weeks successively, the 
last publication to be fourteen days at least 
before said view, and also by posting the same 
iri two public places in the said town of Win- 
chester, fourteen days before said view ; and 
that he make return of his doings heroin, to 
said Commissioners, at the time and place 
fixed for said view and hearing. 

CHARLES T. HUGHES, 

Asst. Clerk 

C opy of petition and order thereon. 
Attest, 

CHARLES T. HUGHES, 

Asst. Clerk 



they may know each other better. Irt 
this way the co-operation between 
home and school, which means s<» 
much to successful education, will Ik; 
increased. 

The meeting will -tart promptly at 
s. so we urge you to come early for 
your "tan" and seat. 

Our Motto 
"The unit of American life is tho 
family and the home. It vibrates 



tfiaiKte, wuiiam r.. Mf, ..,..,.> - . . 

Eleanor H. Klaikie. Emily i". W ilk ins, Robert through every hope ot the future. IL 

c. niaikie. k. Mane Blaikie. and violet s, j s ( | u , beginning of self-government. 
^&"j3^™^?%&«t. if I s II* tnrone »< '•»«• highest ideals. 



Blaikie, of Worcester, in the County of Wor 
coster and said Commonwealth ; and to all 
. whom it may concern : 

I Whereas, a petition has lain presented to 
said Court by Rachel S. Woodard, of Arling- 
ton, in said County "f Middlesex, to register 
and confirm her title in the following described 
land : 

A certain parcel of land with the buildings 
thereon, situate in said Winchester, bounded 
and described as follows: 

Easterly by Yale Street. 75.00 feet ; Souther- 
ly by lanil now or formerly of Isaac K. Sexton 
et al, 139.00 feet ; Westerly by land now or 
formerly of Marion II. Young, 7S.H0 feet; and 
Northerly by land now or formerly of Roger 
Billings et al, 139.00 feet. 

Petitioner admits that the above described 
laud is subject to certain restrictions and 
agreements as set forth in a deed from Herbert 
Na.-h et al to Eliza A, Martin, dated May U", 
duly recorded Hook 3446. i'age ID. 

The above described land is shown on a 
plan Hied with said petition and all boundary 
linos are claimed to bo located on the ground 
as shown on said plan. 

If you desire to make any objection or de- 
fense to said petition you or your attorney 
must file a written appearance and an an- 
| swer under oath, setting forth clearly and 



It is the source of the spiritual ener- 
gy of our people." — Herbert Hoover. 
Cordially yours. 
Leonard O. Waters, 

President 
Marjorie E. Darling, 
Secretary 



EARLY MORNING BLAZE DAM- 
AGED IRVING STREET 
RESIDENCE 

Considerable damage was done t lu r 
residence of Vincent and Rosa Ciar- 
fella at Ho Irving street by a firo- 
which was discovered early Wednes- 
day morning. 

Box .'17 was sounded at 2:40 o'clock 
anil the firemen found a brisk lire in 
progress at their arrival. The fire 
had .-tailed in the attic and practical- 
ly destroyed the roof of the dwelling 
while there was heavy smoke and 
water damage done on the lower 
floors of the house. The amount of 
der of -aid Court in Uoston (at the Court ||„, damage done was not made nub- 

HoUsel, on or botorc the twenty-second day ol . |j 

December next. 

Unliss an appearance is so tiled by or for 
you, your default will be recorded, the said 
petition will be taken as contessed and you 
will be forever barred from contesting said 
petition or any decree entered thereon. 

Witness, tHAKI.r.S THORNTON DAVIS, 
Esquire, first Judge of said Court, this twen- I 
ty-l.rst day of November In the year nineteen 
j hundred and thirty. 

Attest with Seal of said Court. 
I Seal) 

CHARLES A. SUC rHWORTH, 

Recorder 



(left use ti 



specifically your objections 
purl of said petition, in the olhce of the He 



NEWSY PATiAtiKAI'HS 



A true copy, 
Attest : 



HENRY I.. WALKER, 
Deputy Sheriff 
n!4-3t 



Tree Free 
TO LADY PATRONS 
Every Monday and 
Tuesday Kveninss 
GENUINE AMOSKEAG 
LINENWARE 



SILK SALE 

10.000 dress-length remnants of 
finest silk to he cleared by mail, re- 
gardless. Every desired yardage and 
color. All oil inches wide. Let us 
send you a piece of genuine $(! Crepe 
Paris (very heavy flat crepe) on ap- 
proval for your inspection. If you 
then wish to keep it mail us your 
check at only $1.90 a yard. (Original 
price $6 a yd.). Or choose printed 
Crepe l'aris. Every wanted combina- 
tion of colors. We will gladly send 
you a piece to look at. What colors 
and yardage, please? If you keep 
it you can mail us check at $1.25 a 
yd. (Final reduction. Originally $0 
a yd.) 

All $2 silks, $2 satins and $2 
printed crepes are !»0c a yd. in this 
sale. Every color. Do not ask for or 
buy from samples. See the whole 
piece you are getting before deciding. 
We want to he your New York refer- 
ence so tell us all you wish to about 
yourself and describe the piece you 
want to see on approval. Write 
NOW. Send no money. To advertise 
our silk thread we send you a spool 
to match free. 

CRANE'S, Silks. 515 Fifth Avenue 
New York City 



Mr. VYyatt St. Barbe Eustts of San 
Francisco has been visiting his par- 
ents, Mr, and Mrs. George 11. Eustis, 
j at 11 Stevens street, and meeting 
many of his old friends. He has also 
been interested in visiting the North 
and South reservoirs and noting tho 
at many chances and improvements 
- there since boyhood days. He will re- 
turn to the West alter Thanksgiving. 

Miss Rmma T rowan of Dix street 
has returned to Winchester from an 
extended visit to her old home in 
Prince Edward's Island. 

East Saturday's alarm of tire at. 
2:51 p. m. was for a brush lire on 
Woodside road. 

A Foul cabriolet, driven by Roy 
W. Morn of !) Ilridire street and a 
Ford truck, owned by Albert li. Sell- 
er of 34 (lien road anil driven by 
Gecrge A. Donaghry of 62 Brooksidc 
avenue were in collision at :'. o'clock 
last Saturday afternoon at the traf- 
fic beacon in the center. Both car- 
were going westerly on Mt. Vernon 
street and in making a l< ft turn 
around the beacon the coupe's left 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHI'SETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. PROBATE COURT 

To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and all 
other persona interested in the estate ol 

Freeman Nickeraon late of Winchester in said 
County, deceased. 

WHEREAS, a certain instrument purport- 
ing; to be the last will and testament of said 
deceased has been presented to said Court, for 
probate, by Georgiana Nickeraon who prays 
that letters testamentary may be issued to 
her. the executrix therein named, without wiv- 
iiik a surety oti her official bond. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a Pro- 
bate Court to be held at Cambridge in said 
County id Middlesex, on the ninth day of De- 
cember A. D. IV30, at ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon, ti» »diow cause, if any you have, why 
the same should not he granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby directed to give 
public notice there..!, by publishing this ci- 
tation once in each week, for three succes- 
sive weeks, ill The Winchester Star a news- 
paper published in Winchester the last pub- 
lication to be one day, at least, before said . 
Court, and by mailing, post-paid, or deliver- j Tear mudguard and the Pumper of 
iiik a copy of thia citation to all known per- j the truck came together. The dam- 
sons interested in the estate, seven days at | af ,,. W as slight and no one was 
least before said Court. j 

Witness, JOHN C. LEGGAT, Esquire, First j ln J ul . 
Judge of said Court, this thirteenth day of rrallk Rounds, who is at Andover, 

November III tile year one thousand nine linn- j spent the past Week-end with his 

parents in Winchester. 



ured and thirty 

luring r. Jordan, Register 
n21-3t 



NOTICE OF LOST PASS LOOK 

In compliance with the requirements of 
Chapter 167, Section of the General Laws 
and Arts in amendment thereof or supple- 
mentary thereto, notice is hereby given of the ' was the special guest. 

loss ..f Pass Book No. 16,87 l lamed by the Van Cunningham, Winchester High 

W.nchcster Savings Hank, and that written ^ , fl ( . )< . ct „ <| pn . s „|,. |lt „f gj*_ 



The Jewel Club, consisting of 17 
1!»'JH 0. E. S. matrons, were enter- 
tained at a luncheon by Mrs. Wm. M. 
Wood of Highland avenue last Fri- 
day. Mrs. Helen Duncan of Winthrop 




I STRAND 



miiiiiiin fimtiiiT 

TEL. MALDEN 

7 Days Starting 
Sat.. Nov. 28 

A Comedy Version of 
the "Big House" 

"Up the River" 

ftttd 

Conrad Nagte in 

"A Lady 
Surrenders" 

A Great Picture 

Coming Week of Dec. 

"Last of the I.one 
Wolf" 



Q RIDDLE/EX COUNTYV 
AMUSEMENT 

CENTEF \^, 




and that written 
application has been made to said bank for 
the payment of the amount of the deposit 
represented by said book or for the issuance 
of duplicate l»>ok therefor. 

WINCHESTER SAVINGS HANK. 

liy William L. Priest, Treasurer 
n^l -.'it 



MORTGAGEE'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE 

Hy virtue of the power of sale contained in 
a certain mortgage deed given by Thomas S 
Richardson and Charlotte M, L. Richardson, 
husband and wife, as tensnts-by-the-entirety, 



ma Phi Epsili n fraternity of Ohio 
Wesleyan On versity, Delaware, Ohio, 
v'an is al-o p'-ivimr the saxoohone in 
the 50-piece University hand. 

Mr. Ashley K. Hayden of Glengarry 
was elected a member of the Board 
of Directors of the Kiwan s Club of 
Boston at its meeting on Nov, 25, 

The Winchester schools closed Wed- 
nesday at noon for the annual Thanks- 



***** 
**** 




AUDITORIUM 

.INDOOR GOLF COUK/E: 



FIRST 
MOHTd Al. KS 

^rVip have fund* avail- 
able for liberal first 
mortgages on owners' 
homes ... If you are 
planning to buy, build 
or re-finanee — write 
for application blank 
or call at oflice. 

LAWYERS TITLE 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

Hasten Five Cents SB-ringa 
Bank Building 

34 School Street, Boston 

„ TeUphmmt r Liberty . 



of Winchester. Massachusetts, to the Home- 
stead Cooperative Hank, of Boston, Massachu- giving vacation, reopening Monday, 

setts, dated April yth, 1930, and recorded with QeC 1 



Middlesex South District Deeds, B—k 646!i, 
Page fiS. for breach of the conditions contained 
in said mortgage and for tne puipo*, of fore 
elosiiiK the same, will be sold at public auc- 
tion upon the premises deacribed in s.ii-l 
mortgage on Saturday, December <',th, 1080, 
ut half past nine o'clock in the forenoon, all 
and singular the premises described In said 
mortgage, viz: the land in Winchester with 
the buildings thereon, being the premises now 
numbered Is I on Washington Street bounded 
and desrrihed as follows: Commencing at the 
Southeasterly corner of land now or former- 
ly of John Benson, at a point on the Wester- 
ly line of Washington Street, sixty-two 1 62 1 
feet South of the Southeasterly corner of 
Cross and Washington Streets thence running 
Southerly on Washington Street fifty 1 60 1 
feet to land now owned by the Town '.f Win- 
chester; thence rur.nir.v Westerly along sflid 
land of the Town of Winchester one hundred 
twelve and 10 100 1112.401 feet; thence tjrn- 
ing at nearly a rinlit iint-le and running 
Northerly by the remaining land of th" "■ 
grantors, about fifty-five 155) feet to the 
said land now or formerly of .John Benson . 
thence runninif Kast,ri> along said land of 
John Benson, one hundred and S l" 1100.5) 
fwt to the iwiint of beginning, on Wasl ing- 



Police Chief William II. Rogers has; 
placed a new steel, 2600 card capacity 
filinj.' cabinet in the office at Head- 
quarters, and i« Introducing a new 

loose-leaf system of reports, and time- 
sheets to simplify the working of his 
department. 

The high school classes ■ f l!l'27 
and 1928 are holding an informal 
dancing party at the Calumet Club 
tonight, the younger Alumni evincing 
much interest in the affair. 

Work was begun this week by 
Utility man James Noonan of the 
Highway Department on tho marking 
of parking lines for cars on Thomp- 
son street to permit more machines 
to stand in the open air garage there. 

A Ford coupe, operated by Pat- 
rick Sheehan of X', Lewis avenue, 

Arlington, while (?oing south on 
Cambridge street and opposite (Jlen 



ton Street. Containing 6890 square feet of I road, Tuesday skidded and wont over 

land be all of said measurements mo,-,- or less i ( ., ir ,,;„, r hi'ttinf 'i nolo nt the sirio 
B -ing the same premises conveyed to us bj . .« «t rti.ntr, nitt.nt a pole ar UK SlfJe 
Mary J. Saire by deed dated May 1st, 1923, Of the toad. After Striking the polo 
and recorded with said Deeds. Book ii.o'.t, : the coupe went thfeuuh tho hedge 
Pagu MT. Said premise- will be sold jub- an< J or)to , hp ] awn x thr , home of 
j«*ct to any and all unpaid tHx*-, tax titles, \ p j 



unpaid water bills, and municipal assessment? 
if any there may be. Two Hundred Dollars 
in cash to be paid by purchaser at time and 
place of sale. Further term- o. be announced 
at the sale. 

HOMESTEAD COOPERATIVE BANK, 

Mortgage* 
By William D. Eldredge, Trea.-urt-r. 

36 Brom field St.. Boston 
Walter H. and Paul B. Roberts, Attys., 



rt T 



Burr at 50 Glen road. 
The right front and rear wheel of 
the Ford wi re badly damaged and 
the machine was towed to an AHinc-- 



Sl State St.. Boston 



! ton garage, 

I Select yiur Christmas cards now 
I while our stock is complete. Then? 
j are some most attractive now cards 
nn-3t j fur your approval at the Star Oflice. 



12 



THE WINCHES TEK, MASS~ STAR. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28. 930 



316 Highland Avenue 

We an- ]>ri vi l«-^r«-<I to offer for lon>! term lease the unu>u- 
ally-attractive estate created and formerly occupied by Her- 
man Dudley Murphy. The house, undoubtedly one of the 
moht artistic in Winchester, commanding a perfect panorama 
of the West Side hills is of Kn^linh half timber and stucco 
style and is being entirely renovated by the owner. It eon- 
tains a commodious living room with massive fireplace, en- 
trance hull and dining room finished in dark beamed oak. 
kitchen, two servants' chambers and dining room: also chil- 
dren's playroom and den on the hr.-t floor; there are 6 family 
chambers, two tiled baths and upper Bving room with lire- 
place on the second floor: the third floor contain- one large 
chamber and ample storage space. The grounds, a veritable 
park in themselves, comprise nearly three acres of land and 
include many unusual shrubs and plant-, a gravel driveway 
and garage for two car-. A very advantageous lease will !><• 
given to a responsible family. 

SHOWN ONU m APPOINTMENT WITH 



Edward T. Harrington Inc. 



REALTORS 



39 CHURCH STREET 



WINCHESTER 1400 




ONCE A WEEK 

is not too often to have Bailey's drivers 

call for a suit to be 
Brushed Clean, Sponged and Pressed 

75c 

BAILEY'S CLEANSERS & DYERS, INC. 



17 Church St. 

Winchester, Mass. 
Tel. Win. 0528 



Watertown, Mass. 
Tel. Mid. 4361 



n c\ r i 1 1 h r r\ 




t A \. t V 1 ' v I' U i 
t C V 

r ^ i f r i w I v f i 



i.'ii 1 1 r < 
1 1 * w p t. r\ 



i r> r r i a ' 



a n r 1 1 T 

H tJ V **> I 
r\ r r r r\ 



I , t U l M III IIHIIVC 



r. r -j r r IT 
Dtiuri i 



vim 
V * lib 



vrui 



n v * IMif 



Kinwwni. 



"v v nji|ii*jfu«.jiwj miA r 
'532* tJ4j fc? <j V "MitrfE * 1 ^ 



Dresses for the Holiday Specially Priced at $8.95 & $14.75 
Hosiery from 95c to $2.50 per pair 



Automobile 
Insurance 

$3 down 

LOWEST RATE OF INTEREST IN THE STATE 
BALANCE IN SMALL MONTHLY PAYMENTS 
WELL KNOWN STRONG COMPANIES 



I_. W. PUFFER, Jr. 

557 MAIN STREET WINCHESTER 
TEL. WIN. 1980— RES. WIN. 1160 

o31-tf 



Attractive Gifts at Reduced Prices 

RIGHT IN WINCHESTER 

Boys' Sheepskin Lined Coats 

Men's Pigskin Street Gloves 

Boys' Lined Horsehide Mitts 
Bureau Scarfs and Luncheon Sets 

Gordon Full Fashioned Silk Hose 

Talking and Sleeping Dolls $1 to $5 
Flannel Robes and Pajamas 

For Men, Women, Boys and Girls 

Visit Our Handkerchief Table 
"Gordon's" Fashioned Silk Hose $1.00 

Dr. Denton's Sleeping Garments 

White and Colored Muslin Aprons 
Men's All Wool Coat Sweaters 

Men's Linen Initial Handkerchiefs 

Men's Silk Scarfs and Mufflers 
DON'T MISS OUR TOY COUNTER 

Call Win. 0272 and Save Time 

Franklin £. Barnes Co. 



VERNON W. JONES 
Suburban Real Estate 

31 CHURCH STREET 

QUAINT REPRODUCTION of a Connecticut home with at- 
tractive features throughout. Six rooms and bath, fireplace, hot 
water heat, garage, fine location. Priced exceedingly low. 

RENTALS — Many attractive single homes and apartments at 
i 15 to $150. 

TELEPHONE WINCHESTER 0898 



CHARLES HAGUE 

Cabinet Maker 

Antiques Restarrd — Kurnitur* Made and 

Repaired— I ph.l.Urrd and PoliahnL 
SHOP. 17 PARK ST., WINCHESTER 
T*l. Win. 1»48-W 

nl5-tf 




OPEN FOR YOUR INSPECTION SUNDAY 

We extend an invitation to inspect the 
beautiful home of ten rooms, three baths, and 
two-car garage located at Number - Dart- 
mouth Street in the exclusive Wedgemere Park. 

We believe that you will appreciate the 
unusually line construction, design, and the 
many modern conveniences this home offers. 

To reach Wedgemere Park from Church 
Street, go north on Wedgemere Avenue into 
Wedgemere Park. 

RENTALS 

Many single homes to rent in the best location-;. 
For an appointment to inspect call Mr, Puffer. 

HENRY W. SAVAGE, Inc. 

273 HARVARD STREET, COOLIDGE CORNER, BROOK LINE 
Est. 1M0 REALTORS Asp. 1504 

WINCHESTER OFFICE, 557 MAIN STREET, TEL. WIN. 19S0 
RES. TEL. WIN. 1160 



Walter Charming, Inc. 

REALTORS 

EXCHANGE — SHARON FOR WINCHESTER 

High class, 8-room semi-bungalow. Fine location, beautiful 
grounds, modernized, with oil heat. Price $15,000 for attractive, 
high-grade Winchester property, 



I 



EXCEPTIONALLY PLEASANT 



Home on a corner lot of a beautiful side hill, ( lose to center, 
a well built, 8-iooni house, and garage. Fine view across town. 
Large living room, 2 fireplaces, furnace heat. Priced .$!t()0U to at- 
tract quick sale. 

Tel. Winchester 0984 
Helen I. Fessenden Resident Representative 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



NEWSY P \RAGRAPHS 



We have just installed the last word 
in a Permanent Waving Machine and 
are now prepared to give you the la- 
test and best in Permanent Waving. 
The Idonian Beautv Shop. National 
Bank Building, tel. Win. 1408. n2I-tf 

The Fire Department was called 
Wednesday at 11:51 a. m. to put out 
an automobile which was afire on 
Fletcher street. 

Sea Food of all kinds. Cotuit oy- 
sters on half «hell our specialty. Win- 
•hester Sen Food She*, 612 Main 
street, tel. Win. 2230. Free Delivers 

o31-5t 

The Winchester Town Team-Wo- 
hurn Town Team football game had to 
he callfd off Thanksgiving afternoon, 
after three periods of scoreless play- 
imr. when the snow blizzard made it 
impossible to continue. 

Emma .T. Prince, Chironndist, Mas- 
seuse, hours 0-12. 1-5. closed Wed- 
nesday afternoons. Tel. Win. 01 of, 
13 Church street. sl2-tf 

Kel'ev Hawes Company's new j*n- 
raire "-ill b e open and ready for busi- 
ness Dec. 1. n21-2t 

Mr f\ L. Morton, well known hos- 
We salesman who «'«is stricken sud- 
denly ill last we-'-- Thursday and re- 
moved to the Winchester Hosnital. 
was not *o seriously ill a« was nt first 
supposed. II" was dischnr<?«>d from 
Mi,. h -«nital and was renorted as he- 
i"" able to be about again. 

So" the han^som" n*>w line of 
trrppt'r." cards for Christmas at the 
Star Office. 



Farmer's Almanac at 



the Star 1 
n28-tf I 



Oh 
Office. 

Spencer Corsets, Nome Appoint- 
ments. Jean MacLellan. Tel. Win. 
0406-R an*_'7-tf 

Byrd Pictures, Winchester Town 
Hall, Saturday, Dec. 6. Two shows, 3 
p. m., tickets 10c and 20c; 8 p. m., 
tickets 50c. Glee Club in evening. 
Tickets of Mrs. Cleaves, tel. Win. 
1121, Wadleigh Parent Teacher As- 
sociation. 

Young moderns will get a real kick 
out of the McEvoy Christinas cards. 
Get a box at the Star Office. 




JUNIOR COUNTRY CLUS 

40 Winn Street. Woburn 

GOLF— «l oat beautiful miniature count 
in N«W Kngiand. IB hole* 30c ; w- 
ond round Sic. 

DANCE— Snippy band. Friday and 
Saturday Evening. 75c per couple. 

EAT — Delicious toasted aandwichea. 
Light refreshments. 

Come in and ae* our attractive club- 
house. Open 12 noon to 12 midnite 

SUNDAYS 1 P. M. to 11 P. M. 

n7-4t 



"Simple plans, simple words, 
simple manners — by means 
of such are great things ac- 
complished." 

PJONDOLENCES without 
affectation, tributes with- 
out ostentation, a ceremonial 
of serenity and simplicity if 
desired by many. 

M0FFETT and MeMULLEN 

Funeral Directors and 
Embalmers 

TEL. WIN. 1730 

Lady Assistant Ta«i Service 



NORMAN V. OSBORNE 

Carpenter and Builder 

1 CLIFF ST. WINCHESTER 
Tel. Win. 2024-W 



olT-tf 



or 



LUMBER 



REAL 



A. M. EDLEFSON 

ESTATE & MORTGAGES 




DO YOU LIKE DISTINCTIVE DRESSES 
FOR YOUR LITTLE GIRL? 

Then see the new hand-made frocks at Esther's. The 
models shown may be ordered in any fabric or color 
you desire, and in any size up to ten. If you appreci- 
ate style, good materials and exquisite workmanship, 
don't fail to see these, at 



/ 



FOR SALE 



ON THE WEST SIDE — Near the station, in a quiet location. 
9-rooni house, is a maximum of comfort at a minimum expense; 
oil heat, electric refrigeration, 2 baths, pleasant gas kitchen, one- 
car garage. The house is in excellent condition inside and out 
The price is $13,000. 

THREE excellent building lots on West Side. 



10 STATE STREET, BOSTON TEL. HUBBARD 1978 

Winchester Office, 2 Thompson Street 
Tel. Win. 2285 R es . Tel. Win. 0700 



We are as near as your telephone 

F. H. HIGGINS WINCHESTER 0606 

17 KEN WIN ROAD 

Commercial and Home Pliotof rapher 

If you have pictures to be framed a 
telephone call will bring demonstrator. 

Leave your films at Hevey's Pharmacy 
or Star Office for our usual service. 



FOR SALE 



NEAR CENTER. New six-room house with sun-room. Three 
sunny chambers, tile bath, steam heat, garage. Good location. 
Financed to suit buyer. Price $8500. 

RENTAL. Six-room apartment, $10 per month. 

S. V. OLSON 

572 MAIN STREET WINCHESTER 
Tel. Win. 0032— Kes. 0365 



RENTALS 

We have at present a number of attractive single 
houses which can be rented at very reasonable figures, 
the rents varying from $75 a month to $158. 

If you are thinking of renting a single house, let us 
submit our list. 



A. Miles Holbrook 

24 Church St.— Win. 1250 Res.— Tel. 0609 

STEPHEN THOMPSON, Win. 0103-W 



Silk Hose Sale 



1 



An all silk chiffon, with a double pointed heel, in a splen- 
did line of colors, all sizes 8 2 to 10 \ These have 
always sold at a much higher price. While this lot 
lasts $1.00 per pair or 3 pairs for $2.75. 

We are also closing out our L 275, Rayon Stockings. 
These have always been sold for $1.00 per pair. 
While our stock lasts the price will be 69c. 



AGENT FOR CASH'S WOVEN NAMES 



G. Raymond Bancroft 



Til. Win. 8671 -W 

! 



IS Ml. Virata Strart 



PUB LI : LIBRARY i 

i I Jl C H B ST SR 



M A S S 



THE WINCHESTER STAR. 



0\ 



VOL. L NO. 19 



WINCHESTER, MASS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1930 



PRICE SEVEN CENTS 




ALL MYSTIC VALLEY FOOTBALL TEAMS, 1930 



First Team 



LE- 



HURLEY, Wakefield 
1 :v- HAG E R M A N, Arlington 
LG — DINNEEN, Arlington 
C— EMERY, Winchester 
k< '• — II AN N IG AN, Melr< >se 
RT— D. SMITH, Winchester 
RE— LANE, Arlington 
QB -KIDD, Melrose 
LHB — LANE, Watertown 

RHB ROBINSON, Melrose 

FB — FLAHERTY, Woburn 
Utility Lineman — 

RATTIGAN, Watertown 
Utility Back— 
LEE, Winchester 



Second Team 

LE— BRENN A N. Melrose 
LT — W. MacKENZIE, Melrose 
LG — COLPAS, Wincht ster 
C- O'KEEFE, Wakefield 
RG- REEVES, Melrose 
RT GENAR1S, Woburn 
RE- HOEKEL, Melrose 
QB GALUCCI, Arlington 
LHB MUGFORD, Wakefield 
RHB W. SMITH, Winchester 
FB— M. MacKENZIE, Mein.se 
Utility Lineman-— 

SPARKS, Wakefield 
Utility Back — 

KNOWLTON, Winchester 



STAR ANNOUNCES ALL MYSTIC 
VALLEY S£LE( I IONS 



WINCHESTER PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Arlingti n and Melrose Each Have 
Three Men on 1 irst Eleven 



'Recent Fiction" 



REV. SIDNEY A. WESTON, Ph.D. 



A PILGRIM '\ PALESTINE" 



HONOR FOR WINCHESTER 



First Congregat'cnai Church Wednes- 
day Evening at 7:45 

Rev. Sidney A. Weston, Ph.D., of 
Wellesley. who has recently returned 
from a trip to the Holy Land, will 
speak at the mid-week service of the 
First Congregational Church Wednes- 
day evening at V : I ■">. 

Dr. Weston will show motion pic- 
tures of his trip, illustrating the peo- 
ples and the life in presi nt day Pal- 
estine. Among these, will be pictures 
of Nazareth, Bethlehem, and old Jer- 
usalem, the Wailing Wall, and other 
sacred plan s. 

The lecture will be only one hour ! 
long. Dr. Weston is an interesting 
and delightful speaker, and any who 
are interested in seeing his films and | 
hearing him talk on the racial 
struggles and the much debated Zion- 
ist movement in Palestine will be wel- 
come at this meeting. 

The meeting will be held in Ripley 
Chapel. An offering will be taken to 
defray the expenses of the lecture. 
The public is invited. Dr. Chidley 
Will preside. 



COSTUME BALI. BY W1NTON 
CLUB 



The Winton Club held its first cos- 
tume hall in the Town Hall, Friday 
evening, Nov. 'Jet. It was well attended 
and everyone had a most amusing 
evening. The hall was decorated to 
resemble an Italian court yard and 
was very colorful. After a grand 
march, prizes were given for the most 
beautiful, most original and the fun- 
niest costumes. Mrs. James W. Rus- 
sell was awarded first prize for the 
most beautiful costume; second prize, 
going to Miss Phoebe May. Both wore 
Spanish costumes. Mr. Albert K. 
Huckins and Mr. Gordon Parker, 
dressed as babies, won the fust prize 
for the most original costumes with 
tlie second prize going to Mr. and 
Mrs. Merton E, Crush, garbed as An- 
aesthetists. Mr. Laurence Martin, 
dressed as a comedian, was adjudged 
to have the funniest costume; second 
prize going to Mr. George Barton who 
was an old fashioned bathing girl. 

Mrs. Clark Collins and Mr. Lang- 
don Matthews provided a very inter- 
esting tap dancing specialty number. 
Music was furnished by Marion 
Chase's orchestra. 

Mrs. Vincent Karnsworth, Jr., was 
chairman of the committee. Mrs. 
Donald Crowell was in charge of dec- 
orations; Mrs. Clark Collins and Mrs. 
Ernest Stockwell, the refreshments: 
and Mrs. Thomas M. Righter, Jr., the 
tickets. 



MUCH INTEREST IX LEGION 
WRESTLING BOUTS 



Interest in the first big wrestling 
carnival of the season which is to be 
staged tonight in the Town Hall by- 
Winchester Post. A. L. has been in- 
creasing steadily and a hie crowd is 
sure to be on hand when the referee 
calls the first pair of grapplers to the 
center of the ring. 

The Post has left no stone un- 
turned in its efforts to make this its 
best show to date, and the appear- 
ance of the famous Count Zarynoff. 
heavyweight acrobatic luminary, is 
just an indication of the class which 
is packed into the whole length of the 

bi "- ,„ *v 

Three amateur bouts will open the 

show at 8 o'clock and the pros will 
pair off as follows: "Paddy" 
Philadelphia vs Stuart Spears. Al- 
bany; Sailor Arnold of Cleveland vs 
"Nick" Scot ns of Boston: Count 
Zarvnoff of Russia vs "Jack" Al- 
bright of Chicago, Tickets will be on 
sale at th- e'oor at the popular prices 
of ."0c and SI. 

MISS RUTH K. DODGE 

Miss Roth R. Dodge, 42. daughter 
of Mrs. Charles A. Dodge and the late 
Mr Dodge, died ea»ly this morning. 
Arrangements for the funeral, which 
is tc be private, have rot as yet been 
completed. 



charb s Eshback, -11 Brookside ave- 
nue, Winchester, has done th 
lust -4 - 1 1 garden club work in Mid 
dlesex County, according to the' offi- I 
cials at the Middlesex County Exten- I 
si 'ii Service. This honor entitles ! 
him to be a delegate from Middlesex ) 
County to Camp Gilbert, held for a 
week in duly at the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, Amherst. This 
camp is named in honor of the Com- 
missioner of Agriculture. Dr. Arthur 
W, Gilbert, and is attended only by 
i ll club members who have done the 
be.it work in the various counties and 
the state, in the several 4-H club 
| injects; such as garden, handicraft, 
poultry, canning, etc. 

For five years Charles has had a 
productive, well planned, and well 
kept garden in his back yard. Each 
year tie has sent in a neat and com- 
plete record. For the past three years 
he has been the 4-H garden leader in 
Winchester. He won the honor of be- 
ing County Delegate in competition 
with nearly 900 boys and girls who 
enrolled in the 4-H garden club this 
past season. Last year he was sec- 
ond in the county-wide contest and 
was awarded a special 4-H medal. 
He has previously been awarded the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
medal for meritorious garden work, 
and the two-day trip to the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College. This 
year he represented the county in a 
state-wide vegetable judging contest 
held at the Brockton Fair, and re- 
ceived honorable mention. The first 
prize in this contest was a $00 schol- 
arship. 

In the county contest Wallace Sims, 
Acton; and Elmer Bigwood, CochitU- 
ate, were tied for second place. 
Leonard Deane, Groton, was third. 

About 50 4-H garden club mem- 
bers were enrolled in Winchester this 
past summer. Others who had excel- 
lent gardens were: Lincoln Grindle, 
Richard Glendon. Glenn Potter, Rose 
Russo, John Hudson, Leon Baghdoy- 
an, Kenneth Benson, Charles Moran, 
Christine Russo, William McDonald, 
and George Luongo. Among those 
having small gardens, the following 
were the best: Fred Housen, Joseph 
Connolly, Francis Murray, William 
Stevenson and Eleanor Thompson. 

It is the third County champion- 
ship that has been awarded to Win- 
chester. The previous ones were Mil- 
dred Benson in Canning and George 
Def amp in Poultry. 

In the supervision of the gardens 
Charles was assisted by Kenneth 
Benson and Richard Glendon Ken- 
neth, in addition to being a good 
gardener is probably the outstand- 
ing canning club boy in the county, 
and was fourth in the county contest 
this year. 

The garden club numbers had an 
attractive display of flowers and 
vegetables in the' window of Henry 
Duncan's Hardware store on Sept. 
24 and 2o. 



With the closing of the Mystic Val- 
ley League football schedule Thanks- 
giving Day the season for the selec- 
tion of mythical "all" teams opened 
and the STAR herewith offers for 
dissection by experts and near ex- 
perts the above first and second elev- 
i n<. the members of which, we be- 
lieve, include the cream of the c.r- 
cuit performers, 

As in fi rmer seasons the STAR is 
forced to admit that its selections 
have been made on the basis of what 
the boys in the League have shown 
against Winchester, and We know the 
danger of judging a player's ability 
upon what he happens to show on any 
one afternoon. We have been aided 
materially in our judgment by play- 
ers and coaches of our acquaintance, 

and believe we have picked two strong 
teams. We probably have missed 
some good boys, and to them we of- 
fer our apologies and the reassurance 
that few take honorary teams too 
seriously any more. 

(Continued to page :i ) 



All the K in v: Horses Margaret Widdemer. 
Hy Ueasun ul Strength—Gerald W. Johnson. 
Certain People r..lith Wharton. 
Deepening Stream Dorothy Canfietd Fisher, 
fcaimu's Hong Anthony Pryde. 
tiiunta' Uread Mary Weatmacott. 

< rnor of Massachusetts Elliot Paul. 

Green late Alice Duer Miller. 

Hawk '.i the Desert Albert M. Treynor. 

Heroine of the Prairies Shtlia Hargreavea. 

Ironies Itichard Connell. 

The bland Within Ludwig Lewisohn. 

Let's <;.j K. ,J. Rath. 

Mini. .u> of An Infantry oilier Siegfried 
Bassoon. 

Mr. I'ottermuck's Oversight It. Austin Frea- 
man. 

Murder on the Bus Cecil Freeman Gregg, 
Mystery of Hunting's End -M. G. Eberhart. 
Over the Hills Jetrery tarn..!. 
I'hilippa Anne Douglas Sedgwick. 
Seeret of the liungalow Robert J. Casey. 
The Secret Year Pauline Warwick. 
Sun-Up ..n the Range Krederic N, Litten. 
Twenty-Pour Hours Louis Bromfleld. 



ROTARY CLUB 

The two weeks' interval just passed 
between our meetings has in no way 
detracted from the enthusiasm for Ro- 
tary which our members possess. 
There were but two absentees from 
last Thursday's meeting and in all 
probability they will make up atten- 
dance. Our present record stands at 
live consecutive meetings with 100 per 
cent attendance. Seven consecutive 
meetings with but one. absence. 

"Nat" Nichols presented a report on 
Thanksgiving Welfare work in which 
this club was interested. We are sat- 
isfied that our committee made the 
best possible use of the means at its 
command and was instrumental in ere- 1 
ating a great deal of holiday cheer, 
which otherwise would have been lack- i 
ing. There is no doubt that similar I 
conditions will prevail at Christmas. 

Also we are greatly pleased to an- 
nounce that steps have been taken to | 
produce accretions to our Educational 
Fund. It seems assured that in due 
season this fund will be in condition 
to function as it should. 

The guest speaker at this meeting 
wps Rev. R. E. Ham of Reading who 
entertained the club with one of his 
well known dialect readings. Mr. Ham 
lived for several years in the South 
and while there familiarized himself 
with negro dialect. With this as a 
basis he has written several humor- 
ous essavs one of which entitled "The 
Art of Driving a Pig." he presented at 
this time. The club is indebted to 
Mr. Ham for an unusually pleasant 
half hour. 

Dues and Don'ts 

Don't overlook the fact that your 
club, like your own good selves, re- 
nuires nourishment at fairly regular 
intervals. The club treasurer is in a 
receptive mood. 

Percentage of attendance Nov. 20 — 
100 per cent. 



"Worth While Books" 

Albert Einstein— Anton Reiser. 
Birth <»f the American People — James Mor- 
gan, 

The Bride's Hook of Etiquette— Anna S. 

Richardson. 

Collector's l.uek in Spain— Alice Van Leer 
Carrick. 

me on Texas Paul Schubert, 
Cradle Sonn und Other Plays - G. Martinet 
Sierra. 

Fishermen's Saint Sir Wilfred Grenfell. 

George Eliot J. Lewis May. 

He nry Clay 1'riek -George Harvey. 

Kingdom or God and Other Plays — G. Mar- 
tinez Sierra. 

Life of Phillips Brooks — William Lawrence. 

Mary Baker Eddy Lyman P. Powell. 

Memories and Vagaries Axel Munthe. 

Olil Pastures Padraic Colura. 

Personality of a House Emily Post. 

The Itaveii (Story of Sam Houston)— Mar- 
quis James. 

Three Titans -Emit Ludwig. 

Tourist in Spite of Himself— A. Edward 
Newton. 



WINCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 



Honor Roll for Quarter Ending 

Nov. 14. 1S«0 

P. <;. 

John Lutes Hazel Nagle 

Senior ( lass 

Evelyn Anderson Elisabeth Mead 

Ituhy Brown Carolyn Nichols 

Harry Cassidy Margery Poland 

John Crosby Arthur Razee 

Francis Felt George Rogers 

Mary Hathaway Janet Sanford 

M. Hendrickson clam Vozzella 

K. MacDonald Kenneth West 

Junior Roll 

William Abbott Martha Howlett 

Martha Hoyden S. MacDonald 

Virginia Fancie Ida McTague 

Virginia Farrar Penny Marchant 

Edna Foley Janet Niehols 

Mary Giuliani Stanley Osgood 

Isabel Ilea ley Bertha Ross 

Moyd Horn Josephine Smith 

Sophomore Clasa 

Henry C. Anderson Lucille Pratt 

Virginia Hesse Katharine Sanford 

Philotnena Cassari William Seaver 

Dorothy Fancie Rupert Vittingholf 

Albert Haskell Alice Welsch 

Ruth Hathaway Gladys W If. id 

David Kenerson Madeline Young 

Freshman Class 

Leon Baghdoyan Margaret Kenerson 

Janet llradlec Esther Loftus 

Doris Coe Elisabeth Sharon 

Eleanor Cook Eugenia Smith 

Judson Cross Virginia Smith 

Marjorie Dutch Sylvia Turner 

Margaret Ekern Vincensa Vozzclla 

Agnes Fallon Aliee Walker 

Elizabeth Gilbert George Welsch 

Robert Godfrey Louise Williams 

Virginia Hull Albert O. Wilson 



WINCHESTER MAN INJURED 
WOBURN 



IN 



FORMER WINCHESTER ROY 
ORDAINED 

Rev. Hamilton Gifford, since hist 
spring pet ing as pastor of the Tre- 
nt ont Street Methodist Episcopal 
Church, was ordain n d into the Meth- 
odist mini-try last Sunday evening by 
R'shop William F. Anderson. Among 
those at the ordination service was 
the new minister's father. Rev. Altis- 
ton B. Gifford. formerly pastor of the 
Crawford Memorial M. E. Church in 
Winchester. 



M VYORESS WISHES NAME OF 
DONOR 



Albert Doucette of 905 Main street 
received a broken leg when he was 
struck by an automobile owned and 
driven by Asadoor Babigian of 121 
Bellevue street, Lowell on Cambridge 
road, near the Marion farm, Thanks- 
giving night. 

Doucette was riding with James 
Bradley of 10 Water street, when 
they noticed a machine over an em- 
bankment. They got out to see if 
they could give aid to the driver of 
the disabled car and while crossing 
the street, Doucette was struck. 

TO DISTRIBUTE 1000 DOLLS 



TWO WINCHESTER BOYS 
VARSITY AWARDS AT 
NEW HAMPTON 



WIN 



i 



Clifton W. McNeill and James Ha- 
ley, both of Winchester, have been 
awarded letters and insignia in var- 
sity football for their splendid work 
on the gridiron at New Hampton 
School for Boys. Coach Conrad pre- 
sented these awards at the annual fall 
sports banquet held recently at the 
school. 

McNeill, son of Mr. Chester W. Mc- 
Neill of 39 Grove street, is a former 
graduate of the Winchester High 
School. While there, he won two var- 
sity letters in football, was chief of 
the traffic squad, and chairman of the 
class play committee. 

Haley is the son of Mr. James V. 
Haley of 4 Symmes road. He. also, 
attended the high school of Winches- 
ter before entering New Hampt in. 
He held the office of secretary of the 
senior class, played on the \\ . H. S. 
football and track squads, and was 
active in winter sports. 

The Fire Department was called at 
11.12 yesterday to put out a crass 
fire at Allen and Pierrepont roads. 



Mrs. Harry Collis, wife of Mayor 
Harry Collis 'of Winchester, England, 
is desirous of learning the name of 
the person who presented her with a 
pair of silver candlesticks during her 
recent visit here. The eift was s : m- 
plv marked "from a citizen of Win- 
chester," and the Mavoress desires 
to thank the donor. The request is 
made that the name he erven to Mis- 
Elizabeth Downs. Myopia Hill. 



Mrs. Ludmilla Kaula, who died Mon- 
day in Somerville, was the mother of 
Arthur W. Pitman of this town. 



Mrs. Florence Wisvvell of this town, 
chairman of the doll committee of the 
Christmas relief of Crosscup-Pishon 
Post, American Legion, announced 
last night that the committee pro- 
poses to distribute 1000 dolls or more 
for Santa Claus this Yuletide. This 
means, she said, that the committee 
must find at least 1000 dolls within 
the next few weeks so that the orders 
of Santa may be carried out. Dolls 
will be received from donors at room 
140 in the Hotel Brunswick and 
Winchester friends who desire to aid 
may si nd their dolls to Mrs. Wisvvell 
at 70 Fletcher street. 



YOUTHFUL AUTO THIEVES 
SENTENCED 

Pair Who Stole Car in Winchester 
Received l ive Years 



DO YOU WISH TO EXTEND CHRISTMAS CHEER? 



Are yon interested in making others happy at Christmas? 
Do yon wish to extend the Christmas ehoer beyond your own 
family and intimate friends this year? If so please com- 
municate with Mis» Nellie Sullivan. 18 Spruce Street, tel. Win. 
0143-W, Chairman Winchester Board of Public Welfare, or 
Mrs. Harry C. Sanborn. 8 Black Horse Terrace, tel. Win. 0420. 
Treasurer of The Citizens' Community Relief Association. 
This will avoid all duplieations of dinners or gifts. 

d5-3t 



Thomas M. Wallace. 19, of :? Lex- 
ington street, and Frank Carpenter. 

1 1' 22 Main street, both of Charles- 
town, were sentenced Wednesday to 
serve five years and a day in the Con- 
cord Reformatory by Judge James 11 
Sisk in the Middlesex Superior Cr ini- 
tial Court after the pair had been ad- 
judged to be common and notorious 

thieves. 

Wallace an I Carpenter, who were 
indicted with two girls, Rita Mahoney 
and Margaret Gallagher of Charles- 
town and Dorchester, pleaded guilty 
to the larceny of three automobiles, 
h aving the scene of tin accident after 
causing personal injury and doing 
property damage, and to breaking anil 
entering throe camps in Wilmington. 

The young men were locked up in 
Winchester by Chief of Police Wil- 
liam II. Rogers after it was alleged 
they, in company with the girls men- 
tioned above, had stolen two automo- 
biles in Somerville, am! one in vVin- 
i r ester. 

On their way here their machine 
collided with another, resulting m in- 
jury to a young woman riding in the 
latter car. Wallace and Carpenter 
abandoned their second stolon ma- 
chine and took another, the property 
of A. M. Lyman of 359 Highland ;o e'- 
nue, in which they went with the girls 
to Wilmington. 

In the latter town, it is alleged they 
entered several camps in the Silver 
Lake district. The quartette was dis- 
covered Sunday morning by a special 
police officer when their car became 
stalled while they were trying to 
leave the yard of a Wilmington dwell- 
ing. 

Chief Rogers was notified and wont 
to Wilmington, bringing the young 
men and girls back with him to Head- 
quarters where they were locked up. 
They were held in bonds of $2500 each 
for the young men and $2000 each for 
the girls, and failing to produce bail 
were locked up at Fast Cambridge to 
await trial. 

Wallace and Carpenter, the police 
said, were sentenced on the charges 
preferred by the Winchester Police, 
and have still to reckon with the Som- 
erville authorities for the larceny of 
two automobiles in that city. The 
charge of breaking and entering the 
camps in Wilmington was filed. Miss 
Mahoney ami Miss Gallagher are still 
awaiting trial. 



COMING EVENTS 

Dec. ".. Friday, 8 36 p, m. Group Nine 
nance and Bridge, Pint Congregational 

« hurch Pariah House, l ull Win. 0841 for 
tick* ta. 

Dec. 8, Saturday. Byrd Picture! In town 
Mull :it :i a .1 s p. ni Auapicei Wadleich 
i Parent Teach r i:>ti.<n 
| ""' 8. Monday. Dramatic afternoon of 
the fortnightly at 2 p. m in the T..wn 
"all. French Doors" by Carolyn Draper 
, Gflpatric of W Indicator. 

, uT'... 9, r, '' s ' l:l > • • e »i Regular meeting 
or wuiiam Purkman Lodge. Masonic Apart- 

i D ,• ■' Tuesday. Mission Union meeting 
I from 10 t.. I in the Parish House, Kirst Con- 
, r rational Church. Speaker, M , Carolyn 

Mini. y. 

j I' c 11. Thursday. Meeting of Win. Ii »t. r 
■ ■ li'itm I 
home of Mr,. i| .».„ ri j. . hjii! . M . iB 

i - "• >' m,, fiH»K r Mix jluiin Fowl- 

er Soioiat, Juliet StJieev Si::,« 

Dec. 11, Thursday, : -SO ,. m Uvular 
meeting ..i Mj-atic Vallej Lodge M 
Apartmi nt.s. 

Dec. I», Friday. 8:30 p. m, Winchcuter Boat 
l lull j.-wit da nee at th.. Calltm t flu 



CHRISTMAS !S?UE D~C, 1 2 



The annual Christmas issue 
of the Star will be published on 
Dec 12 this year. As usual th s || 
edition will contain extra pages 
and special holiday features. 
Merchants desiring space should 
notif;, this office immediately. 



WINCHESTER TO STAGE FALL 
SPORTS BANQUET 



The annual fall sports banquet, held 
in honor of the football, field hotkey 
and cross country teams, is to be held 
in the Winchester High School gym- 
nasium tomorrow evening. 

This is always one of the big events 
in the athletic year at high school and 
while only the cross country team won 
a championship this fall it is expected 
that the gathering will be by no 
means downhearted. 

Chief among the events of interest 
at the banquet are the awarding of 
1 he Wheeler and Mansfield sports- 
manship cups, and the announcement 
of captains in the several sports rep- 
resented at the dinner. The nr'nei- 
pal speaker is to be Prof. Clarence P. 
Houston of the Department of Phy- 
sical Education and Graduate Treas- 
urer of Athletics at Tufts College. 
Miss Margareta Centervall, Physical 
Director and coach of girls at high 
school, is faculty director of the ban- 
quet. 

KNOWLTON TO LEAD 
SPRINGFIELD 



OUR OFFER 

In accordance with <mr usual 
custom, all new subscriptions to 
the STAR received up to ill, 
lir-t of the year, will be given 
a January tirsf dating. This of- 
fer applies only in new subscrib- 
ers who have not previously 
taken lies paper. Subscribe now 
and receive Ihe remaining issues 
this year free. 



SOMERVILLE VESTED BOYS' 
CHORUS 



The Somerville Vested Hoys' Chor- 
us of 35 voices will present a unique 
program Sunday evening at the First 
Baptist Church of Winchester. 

Attired in solemn vestments which 
accentuate the charm of boyhood, this 
chorus under the able direction of Dr. 
Win. H. Dyas has won reputation for 
reverent presentation of dilTiei it 
church music. An original order of 
worship will be followed including 
responses, chants, antlu ms, | reces- 
sional and recessional. 

A Christmastide sermon on "The 
Choice of the Highest" will be gi n 
by the pastor, Rev. Benjamin 1'. 
Browne. 



FLORENCE CRITTENTON NOTF" 



Henry T. Knowlton, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Edwin M. Knowlton of Salem 
street, was elected yesterday to lead 
the Springfield College varsity foot- 
ball team on the gridiron next year, 

"Hennie," who is a member of the 
junior class at Springfield, has played 
halfback on the college eleven for the 
past two seasons, and previously on 
the freshman team. He has been used 
chiefly as an interfering and defensive 
back 'and his election as captain is a 
fine tribute to his team value. 

The sturdy Winchester boy cap- 
tained the high school team three 
years ago and is one of the greatest 
all around backfield men ever devel- 
oped at Winchester High. 

.M. C. W. (i. NOTES 



The next meeting of Winchester 
Circle, which is to be held Thurd; . 
afternoon, Dec. 11, at Fernway, Lie 
home of Mrs. Howard J. Chidley on 
Myopia Hill, promises to be unusual- 
ly interesting. 

Miss Helen Fowler, who is to s enk 
is the new matron at t hi- Florence 
Crittenton Home. Her pleasing fur 
sonality has already endeared her t > 
all those who have come in conlai I 
with her at the home and her l"i year 
of welfare work in and around B< 
ton qualify her to speak with author 

ty. 

The soloist, Juliet Stacey Shaw, ■ 
prano, will be pleasantly remembered 
by all who heard her in Winches! r 
last year. She will be accompanied h- 
Faye II. Lefavour, long a Winchester 
favorite. Tea will he served. 



WINCHESTER BOAT < Ll'B 

Don't forget the next dance will be 
held at the Calumet Club hall on Fri 
day evening, Dec. 1!» at 8 :;i> p. m. We 
expect an even larger gathering this 
time and this is a Calumet Club as 
well as Boat Club dance. 



The regular meeting for December 1 
will be held on next Thursday even- 

Members interested in the Christ- | 
mas charity work which the Chanta- 
ble Committee is taking care of should 
attend to hear their report. Also, the | 
Regent will report on the quarterly 
meeting of the State Guild, to b« held 
on Saturday. Dec. 6. The reports are i 
alwavs very interesting for they bring 
out clearly the large scope of work j 
carried on by the several Guilds col- | 
lectively, as well as individually. 



MISS ELIZABETH STEVENS 

Miss Elizabeth Stevens of 20 Win- j 
throp street died vest rday afternoon | 
I at the Winchester Hospital after a 
1 brief i'lness. The funeral services will 
be held Sun 'ay afternoon at 2:30 at 
the late residence. 

NEWSY PAHAGRAPHS 

Mr. A. K. Comins, past district 
Governor of Rotary, is at the Phillips 
House for a slight operation. 

Mi^s Muriel Carr. who was recent- 
ly awarded her field hockey insi<-nia 
a't Radcliffe, was on" of the pourers 
at the tea, given last evening by the 
Radcliffe O.tholic Club. 

"Dan" Smith was selected for a 
place on the Globe's second all-scho- 
lastic second team, and "Bob" Lee 
has received honorable mention on 
several "All" groups. 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 

The committee in charge of th • 
banquet and dance which is to be held 
next Thursday evening in Lyceum 
Hall in honor of the Winchester Town 
football team is hard at work trying 
to secure an outstanding speaker t i 
appear <>n that occasion. Things arc 
moving along smoothly and it is ex 
pected that the banquet will be one 
of the best affairs of its kind ever 
staged in Winchester. 

Winchester's well known football 
combination of "Joe" Pendleton, dean 
of officials, and "Bob" Guild. ex-Har- 
vard fullback and coach, were guosts 
of honor last evening at the meeting 
of Woburn Post, American !*egion 
"Joe" and "Bob" entertained the Wo 
burn Legionnaires with stories of 
football as they have seen the great 
fall "ame through their intimate as 
sociation with it as officials. 

Sixty couples attended the Alumni 
dancing party held last Friday even- 
ing in the Calumet Club under the 
direction of "Bennie" Chitel and Ken- 
neth Ciil!'-n. The former secured the 
services of a five piece orchestra 
which was very good to dance to. A 
good time was reported by all who 
attended. 

Miss Carolyn Smiley of this town, 
who has recently returned frim 1 I 
months of world travel which included 
interviews with Mahatma Gandhi nnd 
Jaran's great Christian Socialist, Toy- 
ohiko Kagawa. spoke Wednesday af- 
ternoon in the parlors of the parish 
house of the First Congregational 
Church before a group of Mt. Hol- 
yoko Alumnae. Miss Smiley, who is 
a Mt. Holyoke woman, is associate 
editorial secretary of the American 
Board of Commissioners of Foreign 
Missions, Her subject on Wednesday 
was, "From P< iping to Moscow." 

Th" teachers in the church school of 
the First Congregational Society mot 
Tuesday evening in the parish house 
for dinner and an informal discussion 
of school plans f jt the coming year. 



2 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1930 




We have distributed $44,000.00 to our 1930 Christmas 

Club members. 



JOIN OUR 1931 CHRISTMAS CLUB NOW FORMING. 



An easy way to provide for Christmas expenses. 



Winchester Savings Bank 

WINCHESTER, MASS 



26 MT. VERNON ST. 

BUSINESS HOURS 8AM.T03PM X 




SATURDAYS8AnT0l?M -7T0830 PM 



IS MNCORPORATED 1671 



DR. 



ALBERT GAGE ADDRESSES 
HIGH SCHOOL I'. T. A. 



Suggestions 

For Ladies and Girls 

SILK UNDERWEAR 
VANITY FAIR OVERALLS 
STRIPED BATHROBES 
HOI SE DRESSES 
COOLIE COATS 
LADIES' HOSIERY 
GLOVES 

HANDKERCHIEFS 
LEATHER AND TAPES- 
TRY HANDBAGS 
TAILORED SKIRTS AM) 

SILK BLOUSES 
LADIES' AND CHIL- 
DREN'S UMBRELLAS 
LADIES' AND CHIL- 
DREN'S SHOES 
SILK PAJAMAS 
SILK AND HANDMADE 

GOWNS 
SILK DANCE SETS 

We have a fine selection <>f Baby Gifts and a large selection 
of Doils, Books, Games and Toys. 



Christmas Gift 

For Men and Boys 

DRESS SHIRTS 
NECKWEAR 
GLOV ES 
HOSIERY 
GOLF HOSE 
HANDKERCHIEFS 
BELT SETS 
S\\ EATERS 

BATHROBE AN D SLIP- 
PERS COMBINATION 
MUFFLERS 

UOX SUSPENDERS AND 

GARTERS 
PAJAMAS 

DRESS SHOES AND 

SLIPPERS 
UMBRELLAS 
( APS AND HATS 



UNITARIAN YOUNG PEOPLE 
PRESENT ANNUAL PLAY 
AND DANCE 



Winchester Dry Goods Co. 



540 MAIN STREI I 



TEL. WINCHESTER 22.*.". 



The Metcalf Union, the Young Peo- 
ple's group of the Unitarian Church, 
presented its annual Thanksgiving 
' ntertainment and dance, in Metcalf 
Hall, Nov. 29. The hall was well 
filled. The first entertainers were the 
Knowlton Trio, three very active and 
popular performers at the Unitarian 
Young People's Conference at Star 
Island. They presented several songs 
| and a very clever sonvr and tap dance 
number. They had to present an en- 
I core before the audience would let 
! them leave. 

"Miss Civilization." written by 
Richard Harding Davis, was the name 
I of the play which followed. The cast 
consisted of members of the Metcalf 
] Union, including: .lean Thompson, 
l Stanley Osgood, Andrew Young, Al- 
I len Wood, Richard Elliott and Robert 
I Godfrey. The parts were all excep- 
tionally well played and no one per- 
l son was outstanding. Dancing fol- 
i lowed the play. Mrs. Herbert E. 
I Stone and Mr. ami Mis. Norman L. 
I Cushman were the patrons. The 
evening proved to be a great success, 
both financially and socially. 



"The biggest problems of the boys 
and girls of high school age are their 
parents and teachers," declared Dr. 
Albert Gage, of Wakefield, in his ad- 
dress on "Through the Eyes of 
Youth," delivered before a well at- 
tended meeting of the Parent-Teach- 
er Association of the local high school 
Tuesday evening. "Our children are 
not preparing for life," he continued, 
"they are living life and living verv 
abundantly." 

The speaker referred to a recent 
meeting of a group of boys which 
spent an afternoon discussing the 
main problems it had to face. The 
first of these was the problem of 
choosing a life work. This choice 
cannot be made by the parent or the 
teacher. The adult can only guide 
and counsel. The actual decision 
must be made by each individual 
based upon his interests and natural 
abilities. 

The next problem was that of the I 
relationship between boys and girls, j 
Social good times should be careful- j 
ly directed by the home, the school, 
ami the church. 

The course of education is another 
acute problem. The choice of college I 
or professional school is a question I 
closely allied to that of vocation, j 
There are many boys and girls who , 
do not care to seek higher education. 1 
The problem is one of creating a de- 
sire for knowledge which cannot be 
gained through the teacher who is i 
content to give merely factual data. ! 

The hoys, who considered their own 
problems, clodded that another very j 
difficult one was the art of living to- i 
gether. Upon this problem and its 
I sedation rests the whole fabric of our 
social life. It is harder to master 
than Latin, Creek, or Mathematics. 
What the child should receive from | 
the adult is not so much criticism. I 
but more faith. Words of praise and I 
encouragement can go a long way in 
making the best predominate in the 
growing boy and girl. 

As an added feature of the even- | 
ing's program. Miss Constance Pur- ( 
ington, a member of the hiirh school j 
orchestra, offered two violin solos, j 
She was accompanied at th" piano by \ 
Mrs. S. I.. Johnson of the Hospitality 
Committee. 

Leonard O. Waters, president of 
the Association, presided. Refresh- 
ments were served during the social 
period which followed the main pro- 
gram of the evening. 



Old Farmer's Almanac at the Star 
Office. n28-tf i 

CHICHESTER S PILLS 

THE V1AMOND BRAND. 
L*4lmt Am* T»rr Dramfel lot . 
Ckl-chca-lcr • MwalBfuV 
•Ml la la *t* M<1 «1«M mnalluX 
l»w, Wtird with Blue Ribbon. 

T»k« ■• Mkar. B« af nw 
UnnU AiHnC'in 4'inxTtll 
BlSSIoMI* HKANB PILL*, (or M 
«*an known u Best, Safest. Atvtrs RallXk 

SOLD BY DRUGGISTS EVtRYWHLRf 




Thomas Quigley, Jr. 

Minster, Contractor an* Stone Mason 

PAVING. FLOOH1NK. ROOF SG 
In Artificial Stone. Asphalt 
and All Concrete Pnxiucta 
Ma walks, Driv»„aM. Curbing. SUaa. Ft*. 
Floor* for Cellars. Stables. Factories 
ami Warehouse* 
Estimates Furnished 

18 LAKE STREET 



E. W. NICHOLSON 

PLUMBING AM) HEATING 

We're equipped to handle any 
kind of a plumbing job, big ir 
small, the public has to offer. 
We do our work well and we do 
it in jig time, too. No waiting 
around for inspiration. We will 
do your repair work in a hurry 
and you'll be perfectly willing 
to meet the sort of a bill we'll 
hand you. 

118 WINN STREET. WOBURN 
Tel. Woburn 0H!>» 



BYRD PICTURES 
WINCHESTER TOWN HALL 
SATURDAY, DEC. 6 

2 Shows 

3 P. ML — Tickets 10c and 20c 
8 I'. M. — Tickets 30c 

Glee Club in Evening 

Tickets of Mrs. Cleaves 
Tel. Win. 1121 

Wadleigh I'arent Teacher Association 

nl4-liS-dfi 



Packard 

Appearance and 
Protection 



DRESS TOP 
SIMONIZE CAR 
LACQUER ALL FENDERS 
WASH CAR 
LACQUER ALL SPLASH 
APRONS 
PAINT RUST SPOTS 
LACQUER BUMPERS 
VACUUM INSIDE 
POLISH NICKEL 
PAINT TIRE RIMS 

$40.00 

MAKE YOUR CAR 
LOOK LIKE NEW 

Anderson Motor Co. 

666 Main St., Winchester 

METROPOLITAN GARAGE 
632 Main St. Win. 1053 

Chrysler 



i 



FEEL THIS ANNOUNCEMENT 
WILL APPEAL TO YOl 



DEROSA— SHEEHAN 



A very pretty church wedding took 
place at St, Catharine's Church, Som- 
erville, at •"> p. m., Nov, 27, when Miss 
Elizabeth Irene Sheehan, daughter of 
the late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Shee- 
han of Mnynai'd, was united in mar- 
riage with Joseph W, Derosa, son of 
Mrs. Margaret T. Derosa of IS? High 
si reel . 

Miss Marguerite Sullivan of Som- 
erville, cousin of the ride, was brides- 
maid and William Seanlon of Arling- 
ton was the groom's best man. Fran- 
cis Derosa, bri ther of the p,room, and 
Eugene Sheehan, bint her of the bride, 
Were ushers. 

The bride wore a gown of white 
satin, her veil being trimmed with 
orange blossoms, and she carried a 
bouquet el" white Chrysanthemums. 
Hit attendant was gowned in blue 
satin, carrying a bouquet of Killar- 
ney roses, 

After the ceremony a reception 
was held at the home uf Miss Shoe- 
ban's sister, 131 Albion street, Som- 



erville, where the immediate families 
only were present, owing to the re- 
cent death of the groom's father. 

The house was beautifully deco- 
rated in pink and white. 

Immediately after the reception, | 
Mr. and Mrs. Derosa left on an auto 
trip through New York State. On 
their return they wdl reside at To 
l ark avenue, Arlington, 



C. D. OF A. NOTES 



Th< 

l oned 
place 
Instei 



idd time rs' night has been post- 
fur one month and will take 
at, the second January meeting, 
d ■>!' holding this party on the 
I December social night there will be 
a turkey whist. This whist, on Dec. 
J 18, will no doubt enjoy the success 
j that has been accorded all previous 
turkey whists and the proceeds will 
help in a line way the Court's charit- 
able work at Christmas. 

At this party, there will be bridge 
and whist and tickets may be had by- 
calling the Grand Regent, Mrs. Con- 
■ Ion, Win. 0509, 




25,000 Families 

. . . to please every week 

Our Service JUST HAS TO BE GOOD to 
serve successfully the 25,000 families 
who depend upon us week after week. 

Try our ECONOMY SERVICE 

Even thin 



GUILD OF THE INFANT SAVIOUR 

A business meeting of the Win- 
chester Chapter id' the Guild of the 
Infant Saviour was held on Tuesday 
afternoon, Dec. 2 at Fortnightly Hall. 
The meeting was called to order by 
Mrs. Virgil Ghirardini, Organization 
was completed with the following list, 
of officers: 
President Mrs. Virgil Ghirardini 
Vice President Mrs. William K. Hlckcy 
Secretary Mrs. Michael H. Hintlian 
Treasurer Miss Mary Lyons 
Chairman Sewing Circle Mrs. Louis K. 
Chev a I ier 

Hospitality Chairman Mrs. Arthur W. 
Loftua 

Hrrni Chairman Mrs. James N" Clark 

After the business meeting the af- 
ternoon was devoted to sewing. Tea 
was served under the direction of Mrs. 
Ghirardini ami Mrs. Hintlian, The 
next meeting of the Guild will be held 
on Tuesday, Dec. 16. 

Beginning next January, meetings 
will lie held at '2 o'clock on the after- 
noons of the second and fourth Tues- 
davs of each month at Fortnightly 
Hall. 

'1'he Winchester Chapter of the 
Guild is a branch of the Guild of the 
Infant Saviour of Boston, an organi- 
zation founded in 1906 for the pro- 
tection of mothers and infants and 
affiliated with the Catholic Charitable 
Bureau of the Archdiocese of Boston, 
cf which Rev. Fr. Thomas R. Rey- 
nolds is director. 



I have taken the management of 
Cedar Crest, 21 Main Street, Read- 
ing, midway between Stoneham and 
Heading on the State Road. For sev- 
eral years I have been assistant man- 
ager and prepared all the foods 
served at famous Tox-A-Way Inn. 
As each year increasing numbers 
running into thousands have visited 
this place I feel it has been a testi- 
mony to my products. Popular prices 
will prevail. An innovation will be 
the supper menu from 8:110 to 12 mid- 
night; serving dainties from 2">c to 
.*1.2-">. Christmas and Now Year's 
special roast duck or turkey dinner 
at $1.50. 

Corinne Landry 




SERVICES RENDERED IN ANY 
TELEPHONES: WINCHESTER 



PART OF STATE 
0033—0174—0106 



Service, with us, means anticipt ting the needs and desires of 
our patrons so that they need not concern themselves about the 
slightest detail beyond telling us their wishes. 







auS-tf 

















Miss Carolyn D. Smiley of this 
1 town, associate editorial s ■votary of 
| thr American Board ><( Ooinmiss'on- 
i ei's uf Foreign Missions of the Con- 
I giegational Church, spok ■ last Son- 
dus evening at the Wedeslcy Con- 
gregational Church upon the trip, 
from which she has recently returned 
through the Far East. 




CANARIES 

Nothing would ttr 
mora appreoiaieii 
by your I r i • (v a 
thon s »wect sliut- 

IM cauary 

BIRD 




Melodious son* frlres awar dull enrs 
a" i I'nnra nrU'htnass and liapniue** 
v,hrT6ver th»y M, Ws have Hans 
Mountain s users, 17.00- ««nuln<> 
fluMcd St. Andreasbarr wit" .ran* 
Hirer? trills and srand ranallo.iS. 
day and nl?ht somrsters, 19.00. 

CHAS. LUDLAM 

n BrnmnVrt At, and 29 floswsrth ft. 

Tel. Mb. SiS9 »e«t«n 



returned 
surprisingly low. ' I " 1 1 i ~ 
wt'lcoino service for the winter months 



ironed, at a cost 
in especially 



18 



C il l. WINCHESTER 2100 



$ 



5 



Will put in an electric floor piug 
in any room on the hrst floor of 
your house. 

E. C. SANDERSON 

THE ELECTRICIAN 
Tel. 0300 



1 



New England : 

lauhdrics.fnc.J 



For RHEUMATISM take 

BUXTON'S 

RHEUMATIC SPECIFIC 

You will not rc*r*t it. For sale at Htvey'a 
Pharmacy, l-rt us send you a booklet. Buxton 
Rht-umatir Medicine Co., Abbot Village, Me. 



If You Like Good Things 
You'll Buy 

A. A. MORRISON'S 

FINE CANDIES 

and 

Home-Made Pastiies 

Made in Winchester 
Fresh Every Day 

Clara Catherine Candies 

A. A. Morrison 
19 MT. VERNON STREET 
TEL. WIN. 0966 



j 



Lucille Perry Hall 

SCHOOL of DANCING 

Ballet — Tap — Musical Comedy — Ballroom 

Coaching of Amateur Productions 

Dancers Available for Clubs and Entertainments 
Circular sent upon request 
Telephone: henmorc 6148 
12 HUNTINGTON AVE. (Copley Sq.) BOSTON j 

-'^s ?**™'"*— — ■ ^ 



HALL'S MARKET 

75-77 PLEASANT STREET MALDEN 

Importers of 



From Lunhan Bros., Cork, Ireland 

Distributors of 

S. S. PIERCE FANCY GROCERIES 
SWIFT'S GENUINE SPRING LAMB, GOLDEN WEST FOWL, 
PREMIUM CHICKENS, HEAVY WESTERN BEEF, 
NATIVE PORK 

(,24-tf 



i 



Weed Chains 
Sleet Wands 
Prestone 

Delco Batteries 



Denatured Alcohol 
Mobiloil in Cans or Bulk 
Glycerine 



FOR SERVICE RECHARGING AND STORAGE 
ON ALL MAKES CALL 



26 Church Street, Winchester 



Tel. 1208 



n21-tf 



Winchester Laundry Division 

CONVERSE PLACE, WINCHESTER 
Laundercrs Cleansers Dyers 



PHARMACY FIRST 

KNIGHT 

WINCHESTER SQUARE WEST, AT CHUKH STREET 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1930 



(Continued from page 1) 

STAR ANNOUNCES ALL MYSTIC 
VALLEY SELECTIONS 



Our first team ends arc Lane of 
Arlington and Hurley of Wakefield, 
both big, rugged buys, able to hold 
their own with the tackles, and hard 
tu put out of a play. Hurley, in ad- 
dition, is a good kicker. Brennan ana 
Hoekel of Melrose, our second choices, 
are good all around en la and the lat- 
ter is a tine receiver. Ross of Water- 
town, < anney of Woburn and DiMini- 
co of Winchester are just a stride be- 
hind the leaders in all around class. 

Hagerman of Arlington i.-. the > ?st 
tackle we >aw this season and well lie 
might be. One hundred and ninety- 
two pounds of experienced f ootball 
player, he i- a fine offensive tackle 
and impossible to put out of a play 
when on defense. Winchester's "Dan" 
Smith has the hardest drive of any 
tackle on tile circuit, is also a tough 
man to smear and i impervious to 
injury and tireless. W. MacKenscie 
of Melrose and Genaris of Woburn 
are bol >\ gi i d tac les, able I o d i 
about anything well. Genaris caused 
Winchester plenty of gnef »n the 
holiday. 

\v ... place fitannigan, Melrose's 
great tackle at guard because of his 
ability to come out of the In e ( >r in- 
terference and because he i the type 
of pta, > r able to play an> .' .e re on 
the rushline. His running mate, IHn- 
neen of Arlington, is a big, burly boy 
who with Hagerman was to- bul- 
wark of one of the strongest rlefen- 



d 



all 



sive line- in the Loagi 
Winchester and Reeves of Metros 
our second guards, are both good lin 
men, capable of holding (heir ow 
with the bdst. I o!| a -. a l!)0 p 
er, of times played as good (cm 
as any lineman on the cireutt, vv h i i « 
Reeves, a light weight, a smari 
and very effect ive pi rfoi mar. < !alla 
han of Arlington, DeMuyo of Woburn 
and Androski of Watertown were oth- 
er good guards. 

G< nter goes to W inchester's "Don" 
Em< i y an I we I hink none will chal • 
lenge our choice. The best defensive 
center since A mien ami suffering 
little by comparison defensively with 
thai great p aver, Kmerj passed well 
enough and diagnosed plays smart- 
ly, lie made fully half i f Winches- 
ter's tackles in every game and was 

tile backbone of his team. 0 Keefe 

of Wakefield was a good nil around 
center, who however lacked Emery's 
all around class. Duiovan of Mel- 
rose ami Aylward of Woburn '•••ere 
other goo I pivot ne n. 

Another easy choice was thai of 
••Hex" Kidd of Melrose Cor quater- 
hack. Kidd is t a dy the best run- 
ning back of the yi ar, a tine parser, 
an effective defensive hack and also 
a good Held general, lie ranks with 
the finest in Greater B iston, a really 
great all around performer. Galucci 
of Arlington, second team choice, is 

one of the be t passers around the cir- 
cuit and is a go id enough ail around 
quarterb'u It : o run wt nil best to 
Kidd. McNaniara of Watertown and 
F. Dinan of Wakefield ar. other good 
quarters. 

Lane of Watertown is our choice 
for lefl halfback mid this boy does 
everything well. On a stronger club 

he would have bullied up the League. 
A line interfere!", a good passer and 
runner, as well as a strong defensive 
back, he leaves nothing to be desired. 
Robinson of Melrose is the fastest 
hack on the circuit, a great receiver 
of forward passes ami a tough man 
to catch in a broken field. 

Flaherty of Woburn wins the full- 
back berth on the first team over Lee 
id' Winchester because of his consis- 
tency, lie is a good interfering back, 
a fast, hard runner, fair passer and 
a good punter. 

l.ee, potentially the best all around 
back in the League, is picked for the 
utility back's berth on the first team 
only because he has been a player 
who has seldom performed at any- 
where near his true aility. No hack 
in the League can back up a line like 
Lee can, ami few are better off the 
tackles. Lee can punt, pass and run 
and only needed drive to take his 
place with the all time Mystic backs. 

Filling the utility line berth on the 
fust team is Rattigan Watertown's 
rangy tackle, who played great ball 
on a weak team. Only a couple of 
unusually strong players kept him 
from a regular place on the eleven 
as he had no weaknesses worth men- 
tioning. 

Completing the backfteld of our 
second team are Mugford of Wake- 
field. Wilmer Smith id' Winchester 
and Harold MacKen/.ie id' Melrose. 
All are good boys who have played 
consistently good football all fall. 
Mugford, at left halfback, is a hard 
line crashing back who was one of 
the League's leading scorers, a good 
performer on a not -so-good ball club. 
Wilmer Smith is Winchester's best 
all around back in the opinion of the 
writer, a boy who did everything but 
kick well. ' Few, except his team 
mates and coaches will give "Smit- 
tie" the credit which is his. due as he 
is. not the flashy type of player, but 
rather the steady dependable per- 
former who is the real answer to 
every coach's prayer. Harold Mac- 
Ken/.ie of Melrose is a good, all 
around fullback, an effective line 
plunger ami interferer and a con- 
sistent performer over several sea- 
sons. 

Winchester's "Hal" Knowlton draws 
the assignment of utility back on the 
second team and only a hair line sep- 
arates him from the hoys in the first 
group. This Sophomore will reckon 
with the best another season as he 
can run, kick, pass, receive, and is a 
good defensive back. Fuller of Mel- 
rose. Foley of Woburn. Lundblad of 
Winchester and Dulong of Wakefield 
are other backs above the average, 
and it is likely that Dulong would 
have landed in the money hail it not 
been for injuries which prevented his 
playing part of tile season. 

Sparks of Wakefield is our second 
team utility lineman and is a boy who 
has played steadily good football with 
a losing club. Perhaps one of the best 
utility linemen on the circuit is little 
Ralph Ambrose of Winchester, who 
has been called upon to play center, 
guard and tackle during the past two 
seasons. He has done well in each 
of his jobs anil is one of the best 
passing centers in the league. Only 




Eight times inspected and checked 

HOOD'S GRADE A MILK 

is surely best for your baby 

INSPECTORS select the dairies. Veterinaries test the cows. Inspectors supervise farm 
conditions and methods. Veterinaries regularly examine the cows. Milk is inspected 
and tested at the country receiving stations. Milk is checked again at the city pasteur- 
izing plants. The Hood laboratories make more than 250,000 scientific tests yearly. 
Then when the bottles are filled, they pass before the trained eye of an expert. 

Eight times in the production of this fine milk direct supervisional contact is made. 
Nothing is left to chance or guess. Every factor relating to the quality, safety and cleanli- 
ness of Hood's Grade A is built on scientific precision. The result is uniformity, dependa- 
bility, unvarying fine quality, with a delightful natural flavor that babies and children love. 




HOOD'S 

GRADE A MILK 

From Tuberculin Tested Cows 
Delivered Fresh from Farm to Home 7 Days a Week 
H. P. HOOD & SONS, Dairy Experts 

WEST MEDFORD, MASS. Telephone MYSTIC 0710 

Tune in "H. P. Hood & Sons Modern Concert" 
Wednesdays -W. B. Z. -W. B. Z. A.- 9:00 P. M. 



Illt 'll MILK— Better than legal require- 
ments for Grade A Milk. Rich all 
through. 

<'I.KA\ MILK— From clean cows, 
produced under rigid supervision. 
Hood's standards are three times as 
strict as State laws. 

TESTED < OWK- From cows tuber- 
culin tested under State and Federal 
supervision, and then especially se- 
lected by our own inspectors. 

CLE A3 BOTTLES- Bottles are scientifi- 
cally cleansed and sterilized by the 
most modern equipment in New 
England. 

SEALED IIOTTI.KS-Double staled 
to prevent tampering or contami- 
nation. 

PASTEURIZED -With the most mod- 
ern and scientifically correct methods 
and equipment. 



his lack of weight gives the boys 
picked ahea.l of him their jobs. 

-Mystic Valley football this season 
has surely been no better than in the 
past several seasons, and yet on the 
two occasions when comparison was 
possible, it has compared favorably 
with the brand of ball played in the 
Suburban League. Melrose beat Mai- 
den and Arlington held Somerville to 
a tie. Most of the games played, 
aside from those in which Melrose 
figured were hard fought and inter- 
esting. The Melrose club was easily 
the class of the League, and carried 
by far too many eruns for the other 
teams to cope with. 



PARK BOARD NAMES JOHN L. 
SHERMAN SUPER] N TEN I ) F.N T 



THREE ALARMS TUESDAY 



MRS. WOODSIDE TO SPEAK 



I Sunday evening at 6:30, in the 
I Meyer Chapel. Mrs. Alonzo F. YVood- 
| side will speak to the members of the 
j Union and their friends, on "Christ- 
| mas in Norway." Everyone is cor- 
I riially invited to attend this unusual- 
ly interesting talk, which Mrs. Wood, 
j side has so kindly consented to give 
; the young people. 



The Park Board at its meetings 
; last Monday evening appointed John 
i L. Sherman of Dix terrace Superin- 
i tendent of the Park Board, to suc- 
ceed Alexander Macdonald, recently- 
deceased. 

Mr. Sherman has made Winches- 
, ter his home for more than 30 years 
and is widely and favorably known. 
He was lor four years a member of 
the Fire Department, driving Hose 
1. and later was employed for six 
years at Blaisdell's Market. For the 
past 24 years he has been manager <»f 
the S. K. Ames store in Winchester, 
being known as one of the company's 
most capable managers in this dis- 
trict. He is a member of William 
Parkman Lodge of Masons and of 
Waterfleld Lodge of Odd Fellows. No 
, announcement of when he will as- 
| sumo his new duties has been made 
public. 



John Ghirardini spent last week- 
end in Winchester with his parents. 
He Is attending Worcester Academy. 



The Re.) truck which has been in 
use for some years by the Tree De- 
partment has been discarded and 
"Bill" Nicholson and his "bullv boys" 
now cover the town in a Ford, pur- 
:hascd from Bonnell Motors Co. 



The first of three alarms which the i 
Fire Department was called to an- ; 
swer on Tuesday came at 4::!.'5 in the 
afternoon when residents of Orient 
street reported smoke issuing from 
a house in process of construction 
there. The firemen found upon ar- 
rival that salamanders were drying 
out the plaster. 

At 5:05 p. m. a delivery truck, 
owned by the Economy Grocery Com- 
pany, caught tire at the crossing in 
the center, tieing up traffic for a few- 
minutes. The damage was slight. 

A general alarm from Woburn 
Box 612 called Engine .'5 and the 
Chief's car to Woburn to assist at 
the big fire which badly gutted the 
old Grothe plant on Everett street. 
The men had a cold three hour fitrht 
with the fire before returning to th" 
local station. While goinir unstair< 
at the plant during the fire, Fireman 
J. Edward Noonan severely wrenched 
his knee. He continued to work- 
though limping badly. Upon his re- 
turn to the Station he found the knee 
very painful, but waited until Wed- 
nesday morn ng before consulting Dr 
Richard W. Shechy. The latter found 
an injured cartilage and was obliged 



to place the leg in a cast. It is like- 
ly to he some time before Fireman 
Noonan will be able to report for 
duty. 

WADLEIGH PARENT TEACHER 
ASSOCIATION 



NOTARY PUBLIC 
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE 



The December meeting of the Wad- 
leigh Parent-Teacher Association will 
he postponed until January. The 
date will be announced later. 



T. PRICE WILSON 



Old Farmer's Almanac at the Star 
Office. n28-tf 



Star Office 



ESTABLISHED 1k:>2 



John Bryant Sons 

15 M0NTVALE AVENUE, WOBURN 
Service of Quality and Dependability 
TELEPHONE 1897 



4 



THE WINCHL VTER, MASS., STAR , FRIDAY. DECEMBER 5, 1980 



The Winchester Star! newsy paragraphs 



rH£Ol>ORE P. WILSON, Editor and 
Publisher: WINCHESTER. MASS. 

SINGLE COPIES, SEVEN CENTS 
Left at Your Residence for One Year 
The W mchewter Star, S2.50. in advance 

News Items, Lodge Meetings, Society 
Events. Persons!*, etc., sent to this 
office will be welcomed by the Editor 



Entered «t 
, huaettt, 



the 

ft* 



pMtofficc at WinchMter. 
■ ?rono-rlBM matter. 



TELEPHONE NUMBER 0029 



Yesterday afternoon a huge oil , 

truck loaded with 1500 gallons of 
crude oil split a seam on Main street 
near the Medford line. Patrolman 
James E. Farrell of the Police De- ' 
partment notified the Fire Depart- I 
ment and Chief David H. DeCourcy 
went to the scene of the accident to 
superintend a crew of workmen who j 
covered the crude oil on the ground 
with sand. 

Miss Ruth Tompkins of this town 
is a member of the committee in 
charge of the Wheaton College Bazaar 
to be held this Saturday. 



Far be il from t li<- 
< nee-- <>i' OUf 1 own. N 
we have in Winchester 



STAR to ciitcr seriously into factional differ- 
.thing pleases it more: than the knowledge that 
a homogenous and united community wherein 



everyone considers his neighbor as himself. But it it might be per- 
mitted to enter into a discussion oi ways and means in solving our mu- 
nicipal problems it would be tempted to offer a bit of advice to those 
of our residents who are worrying over the Symmes Park water tank. 
It. advice to these residents is to concentrate upon an artistic (and not 
t ot) expensive » plan to decorate this tower. It predicts that it a com- 
prehensive scheme for beautifying this tank is presented to the citizens 
at our nexl town meeting, it will be courteously granted. It such a plan 
is not desired, and a plea made to remove the tank, it will be refused. 
\sid" from any viewpoint of serviceability and viewing the matter from 
a poiui removed from the immediate vicinity, we would just as soon live 
al(iu« side this water tower as one of our beautiful schoolhouses— pro- 
vided it held some qualifications of beauty. Our only criticism of its 
erection \- that this point was omitted in its design. As an individual we 
alwav- like to see our hills and high places crowned with some mark of 
distinction, albeit of the beautiful and artistic. As an enlightened and 
intelligent people we should long before now have recognized that beau- 
is holds its place in all things and not pass any of our public or private 
projects by without artistic consideration. In childhood days the conical 
top of a tower in a nearb\ northern town, rising amid green foliage of a 
sightl) knoll, was long a laud mark of the great world beyond, bringing 
visions of castles and conquests and marking the goal of our hrst desires 
to travel in unknown and delightful places. That our questionable tower 
should be beautified serin, right and proper; that it should be torn down 
and removed to a site less advantageous and useful seems needless. 



A GENTLEMAN RECENTLY 
SAID TO ME 

"I consider m v Life Insurance 
of ? 100.000.00 the best property 
1 own. 

"A man can never tell the ac- 
tual selling value of his Heal 
Estate. 

"I have quite a large number 
of good Bonds, think of the sac- 
rifice if they had to bo sold to- 
day . My Life Insurance is ab- 
solute. 

"If I need money in a great 
emergency I can borrow it very 
quickly without question." 



WILLIAM W. HILL. Ao 9n t 

77k" Northwestern Mutual 
Lift- Insurance Company 

235 Park Square Building 
Bom ton 

Phone Hancock 3765— Win. 041s 



% .- > 

I f 



Winchester 

NATIONAL 

Bank 



Notice to Members of Our 
Christmas Club 



Indications point this season to 
abundont Christmas shopping in Win- 
chester. The tendency, without doubt, 
will be towards intelligent purchas- 
ing and the limitation of lavish buy- 
ing which has marked former years. 
VVe believe, however, that the aver 
ago family will not curtail its usual 
holiday gifts and will endeavor to 
mal e its selection so far as possible 
in Winchester stores. Thus far this 
fact is noticeable. Furthermore it is 
but natural, for why should not our 
own families support the local mer- 
chants at this season? The STAR 
(irmly believes that this outlines the 
situation in Winchester. In turn, our 
our local merchants should make 
every endeavor, without undue op- 
timism, to meet this trade which ap 
pears promised them. The 
mas spirit is hound to prevail and 
our people know that all local mer- 
chant'- depend upon their holiday 
trade for the larger part of their win- 
ter receipts. Every Winchester mer- 
chant has 1 n called upon during the 

year to give his support to the vari- 
ous enterprises fostered by residents 
from every section of the town. Their 
appreciation of this fact, together 
with the knowledge that a town 
thrives largely through the prosperi- 
ty of its merchants, will undoubtedly 



result in at least normal Christmas 
trading here. If the merchants do 
not fall down on their part of the 
job, the STAR predicts normal and 
satisfactory Christmas trade. 



The STAR has watched with inter- 
est the withdrawing from the Subur- 
ban League of several high schools 
which for many years have competed 
athletically with this group. The 
Suburban situation has interested us 
only because the schools involved 
have been courageous enough to break 
away from a combination which 
seemed to them to be not entirely for 
their best interests. Why they wanted 
to withdraw, we don't know, but for 
one reason or another they evidently 
felt that their particular athletic de- 
velopment could best lie accomplished 

outside the Suburban circuit. For 
some time we have felt that Winches- 
ter should withdraw from the Mystic 
League if its personcl is to remain as 
it now stands. Melrose, Arlington and ' 
Christ- Watertown have outgrown the league 
and from now on are going as a gen- 
eral thing to carry too much power 
for Winchester, Wakefield and Wo- 
burn to compete with on even terms. 
The first three named are big schools 
in large communities, in which a ma- 
jority of the boys available attend 
high! and not private schools. View- 
ing the situation purely from Win- 
chester's standpoint, it is our opinion 
that the high school here should do 
one of two things, either drop out of 
league football competition entirely 
or get into a grout) of schools more 
nearly its equal athletically. We do 
not mean that teams like Arlington, 
which has long been n cherished rival 



Far from it. Hut Winchester should 
not compete with schools the size of 
Arlington and Meln.se on a cham- 
pionship basis, because in the long 
run the local boys are going to find 
such teams too strong for them. When 
the success of a season is going to 
depend upon a school's standing in a 
league, then that school should not 
be a member of a group physically 
too strong for it to compete with on 
even terms. As things are now in 
the Mystic Valley League, Winches- 
ter is going to have no better than 
a fighting char.ee of winning, if 
everything happens to break just 
tight, ami only very occasionally 
when a particularly strong group of 
boys is available can the local school 
hope to finish out in front. Winches- 
ter has made a good showing in th" 
Mystic Valley League, but only fine 
coaching and exceptional conditioning 
of its meager material has permitted 
it to do so. The fact that each year 
the locals have won a majority of 
their games played has gone for noth- 
ing in the face of losing certain ob- 
jective league engagements. And so 
we say that if Winchester is to play 
league football, it should play in a 
league, the other members of which 
are more nearly in its particular 
athletic class. It is our opomion that 
a league ('(imposed of teams like 
Stoneham, Wakefield, Lexington, Bel- 
mont, Wobum and Concord would 
more nearly suit Winchester than a 
proup like Melrose, Arlington and 
Watertown. The ideal league is one 
in which each member has an even 
chance in most seasons to win the 
championship. The Mystic Valley 
League so far as Winchester is con- 
cerned is not such a league. We don't 
of course know how the local authori- 
ties would feel about withdrawing 
from the Mystic League and attempt- 
ing to form a new circuit of schools 
more nearly in Winchester's class. 
We personally are for it, and would 
like to see those in charge of Win- 
chester's football give the proposition 
earnest. consid( ration. 



AL«. PAYMENTS FOR PRESENT MEMBERS MUST BE MADE ON OR BEFORE 
NOVEMBER 29th. 



BOOKS WILL CLOSE ON THAT DATE. 



CHECKS WILL BE MAILED TO MEMBERS OF OUR 1930 CLUB ON DECEM- 
BER 3rd. 



BOOKS ARE NOW READY FOR OUR 1931 CLUBS. WE ARE OPEN SATUR- 
DAY EVENINGS FROM 7 TO 8:30. 



i -jji ^lu. mi. xiiAiii ii£ iiSTal 



i 



NEWSY /' NRAGRAPHS 



Winch 



^r. 



?hc 



be playei 



JORDAN HALL - ■ BOSTON 

Wednesday Evening, December 10th at 8:15 
SONG RECITAL 

by 

Virginia Warren 

Soprano 

BERNARD ZIGHERA. Accompanist 

Tickets $2.00. $1.50, $1.00 and f>0 cents. On sale at Jordan Marsh 
C . (Travel Bureau, Street Floor) and Jordan Hall Box Office. 
Management: A. H. Handley, 162 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

r»2S-St 



I 
I 

i 



Are You Friendly with 
the Doctor? 

Exposing your bare shoes to the elements at this 
time of the year is helping Doc. Your health depends on 
proper foot protection. 

Let Us Prescribe for You 

GLOVE BRAND RUBBERS OR OVERSHOES 
CONVERSE RUBBER-OVERSHOES 
U. S. CLOTH GAYTEES— LOW. CUBAN OR HIGH HEELS 
BARKER BOOTS FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY 
BOYS' HIGH-CUT STORM BOOTS 




Quality Footwear 

9 Thompson Street Winchester, Mass. 

Tel. Win. 1983-M 



L. R. Palmer of this town, who is 
a student at the University of Ver- 
mont, recently won the University 
| tennis championship for 1930 by do- 
I feating Fred Tupper '32 of Burling- 
ton. By virtue of this victory, Palm- 
er secured permanent possession of 
! a cup and won the privilege of hav- 
' ing his name engraved on the Aid- 
rich Memorial Cup, a trophy which 
has been in competition since 1!>23. 

The Star learns that.Bruce Colpas 
and ('apt. "Don" Emery have been 
chosen on the Transcript's All-Mystic 
League team, selected by the circuit's 
coaches. 

Last Friday a Jewelt touring car 
driven by Oliver S. Lawson of 421 
Washington street and a Chevrolet 
coupe, driven by Theodore J. Pieri of 
Fellsmere street, Wakefield, were in 
collision on Washington street at 
Irving street. According to the po- 
lice, Lawson was driving south on 
Washington street and stopped his 
machine at Irving street to pick up 
s | E. N. Giles of 12 Stone avenue when 
s | his car was struck in the rear by the 
| | Chevrolet. Both cars were damaged 
| | and (iiles was thrown from the run- 
I I ning board of I.awson's car to the 
| i ground. He was reported as unhurt, 
j j Mr. and Mrs. Paul B. Badger and 
! ! family, who have been temporarily 
I ; in Winchester, following their return 
j ; from Paris, left last Friday for New 
i | York where they are to make their 
I permanent home. 

Miss Anne Simpson of Wedgemere 
avenue is cast to appear in a drama- 
tic entertainment to be staged Sat- 
urday evening at the House in the 
Pines School in Norton. 

Motorcycle Officer John Hogan of 
the Police Department is reported as 
able to get out a hit after being con- 
fined to his home for some time by 
illness. 

Miss Helen Glover of Reservoir 
street was one of the Boston Univer- 
sity students who ushered at the re- | 
cital given in Symphonv Hall last j 
evening by Professor Houghton of 
B. U. 

The members of the Winchester 
Police Department who recently took 
the mental examination for Sergeant 
have been notified to report for physi- 
cal examination. All the candidates 
wee successful in the written test. 

The Fire Department was called at 
5:53 p. m. yesterdav to put out a 
grass tire on the Shore road. At 
7:10 p. m. the men were called again 
for a recurrance of the same fire. 

The Fire Department was called at 
7:53 last Saturday evening when 
smoke was smelled in the block at 
f>lfi Main street. The trouble was 
found to be a smokey stove pipe. 

Mr. Basil Burwell of this town, is 
to play "The Young Man" in "Mock- 
begjrar," at the Dec. 11 piay given 
by the Whitehouse Academy of Dra- 
matic Arts, at the Whitehouse studio, 
418 Pierce Building. Boston. Mr. 
Burwell. who is well known in Win- 
chester as a young man of marked 



a? 



"A Gift That Lasts 



Give A RADIO 




$152.50 less Radiotrons 
Delivers on 
Budget Plan 



( 20 



AND GET SATISFACTION— 

Your family will ap- 
preciate one of these 
Famous Makes pur- 
chased from us. 

Victor R-15 $112.50 

Atwater Kent-70 119.00 

General Electric F-41 ... 112.50 
Stromberg Carlson- 10 . . . 259.50 

All Prices Quoted Less Tubes 



1931 MIDGET RADIO $ 

Tubes Extra 



49 



.50 



Radio Store Open Evenings 
Till 9 P. M. 



S. S. McNEILLY CO. 



547 MAIN STREET, WINCHESTER 



TEL. WIN. 2070 



dramatic talent and who is frequent 
ly billed with the Ford Hall Players, 
is showing an unusual degree of de- 
velopment in this. Ins second year at 
the Whitehouse Academy. Not only 
are his impersonations of the various' 
characters assigned to him at White- 
house very well done, but he is mani- 
festing considerable ability in stage 
technique. 

Mrs. Donald M. Belcher of the Win- 
chester Country Club, one of the best 
women golfers in the State, has been 
nominated for the 1931 executive com- 
mittee of the Women's Golf Associa- 
tion of Massachusetts. Mrs. Belcher 
is to serve as chaiiman of the inter- 
city and interstate committee of the 
M. W. G. A. 

.lames N'oonan of the Highway De- 
partment has placed the safety lad- 
ders around the various town ponds 
in anticipation of the annual skating 
accidents. 



Those Edgar Guest Christmas cards 
yon have been looking for are at the 
Star Office. 



SALE OF 

Leather Jackets, Sweaters, Stockings 
Useful Christmas Gilts 



H. M. SAWYER & SON 

Corner Second and Thorndike Streets 
East Cambridge 



THK WINCHESTER, MASS.. STAR. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1930 



5 



Shares For Sale 
in Series 




Winchester Co-operative Bank 



11 Church Street, Winchester 



Willard T. Carleton 
John ( hallis 
Earnest K. Eustis 
Vincent Farnsworth 
George A. Fernald 



DIRECTORS 
James J. Fitzgerald 
CharleH A. Gleason 
Daniel W. Hawes 
Alfred H. Ilildreth 
James Hinds 



Telephone 1078 

Ravmond Merrill 
Curtis W. Nash 
Sewall E. Newman 
Frank E. Randall 
Samuel S. Symmea 



SUNDAY SERVICES 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Benjamin V. Browne. Pastor. 31 Church 
street. 



Communion Sunday, IKf. T. 9 :30 a. m.. 
Church School. Classes for all ages 

»:30 A. M. Everyman's Class meets in so- 
cial hall. All men welcome 

1U :4i A. M. Morning worship and Com- 
munion. Sermon by th>* pastor: "Why Did It 
Behove Christ to Sutler?" Music by quartet 
and senior choir . 

4 P. M. — Rehearsal for Christmas pageant. 

6 P. M. V. P. S. C. K. Leader Robert 
Winchester. 

7 P, M. Evening worship. The Somerville 

Vested Hoys' Choir of So voters will sinx The 
pastor will preach on the subject: "The Choice 
of the HiKhest." 

Monday. 8 P. M. Meetinu of officers and 
teachers of the church school in the church 
parlors. Speaker to be announced. 

Tuesday. 3:30 P. M.— Junior Christian En- 
deavor meeting. 

Wednesday, 7:46 P. M. Prayer meeting. 
Led by the pastor. Subject. "Putting Mean- 
ing Into the Lord's Prayer." 

Thursday All day meeting of ladies of the 
church to sew on pageant citatumes- 

Friday, 3 :4."> P. M. Pictures for the chil- 
dren. At 8 p. m.. pictures for adults in social 
hall. 

Saturday, Dec. 13 Junior Choir rehearsal. 



I SICCOND CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

! It. v. John K. Whitley. Pastor. on; Wash- 
; iligldll street. Tel. Win. U7M-J. 

Sunday, 10:30 A. M.-The Book for all 
People. 

12 M Sunday School. 
I 7 P. M. — The Early Christians. 

Wednesday. 7 :4f> P. M. Mid-week service. 

j Study of Fourth Commandment, 

The Every Memlier Canvass is now on and 
it is expected that a final report will be made 

' soon. 

1 The eitrhth anniversary of the Cornerstone 
] Bible Class will be observed New Year's Eve, 

Wednesday. Dec. 31 with a varied program 
I from K p. m. to 11:30 p. m. Then the ninth 
I annual Watch Nitfht service will be held in 

the church 11:30 to 12 o'clock at which time 

will come the rinirinu out the old and rinuintj 

in the New Year, 11*31. 



WINCHESTER TRUST COMPANY 

WINCHESTER MASS. 




UNITARIAN CHURCH 

Rev. George Hale Reed, Minister, 
field load. Til. Win. 0424. 



H Ridge- 



LOST AND FOUND 



FOUND Grey and while kitten. Apply at i 
30:', Highland avenue or tel. Win 0128 

LOST Gray cut wearing collar. Tel. Win. : 

1866. I 

■i i 



TO LET 



LANDSCAPE PLANTING 
SHRCR8 AND TREES 
at the Melrose Nurseries 

A. M. TUTTLE & CO. 

261 Howard Street. 
Melrose Highlands Msss. 
Tel. Melrose OC42 

mhl5-tf 



TO LET Modern apartment, suitable for j 
dentist, doctor or private family in Winches- , 
ter Souare, 661 Main street. Call Highlands 
6828. n21-4t 

TO LET Garage at 62 Oxford street. 
Win. 2*>1 



Tel. 



TO LET Single garage, heated un Gover- 
nor's avenue Tel. Win. 2177-M 

TO LET Furnished room on bathroom 

floor; centrally located. Tel. Win 17*3. • 

TO LET l.nree. heated, front room; suit- 
able for business man or woman. Tel Win. 
|()4(i-W. 



TO LET fi room apartment and sun parlo 
in first class condition. Can i~' seen anytimi 
Call Win. 020M-W. 



FOR SALE 



FIREPLACE WOOD!!! 

4 foot lengths (per cord) . . .$1S.OO 



First Class Upholstering: 

SLIP COVERS MADE TO ORDER 
MATTRESSES 
Repair Work a Specialty 

H. J. ROSCOE 

3s CHESTNUT RD. S I ( IN Ell AM 

Telephone 0172-W 
Reference aps-tf Reasonable 



ONE. TWO AND THREE ROOM 

Apartments in Stetson Hall 

Now ready for occupancy. Rent $15 
to $»0 per month. Every modern con- 
venience, including elevator and re~ 
frigeraion. APPLY TO THE JANITOR. 



Sunday, Dec. 7- Public service of worship 
at 10:45. Mr. Reed will preach. Subject: 
"The Overlooked." The primary department 
of the Sunday School, Including the kinder- 
garten through the third grade, will meet at 
10 :4.'>. The junior department, including the 
fourth grade through the eiKhth, will meet 
at »:80. The Metcalf Union will attend the 
morning church service and omit noon classes. 
The music for the morning church service will 
be as follows : 

Organ Prelude Sonata in A Major 

Mendelssohn j 
Anthem Prepare Ye the Way of the Lord 

Garrett 

Anthem Thou Wilt Keep Him in Perfect 

Peace Peace 

Organ Postlude Carillon Vierne j 

Sunday, lite. 7 M'/tcalf Union meeting at 
6:46. A light supper will be served to the 
members of the Union. Mrs. Alonv.o F. 
Woodside will give an informal talk to the 
Union and their parents, in the Meyer Chapel 
at 6:30. Everyone is cordially invited to at- 
tend. 

Tuesday. Dec. !l -Ladies' Friendly Execu- 
tive Hoard luncheon in M.tealf Hull at 1 p m. 

The service in King's Chapel, Boston, Dec. 
8-12, will be in charge of Rev. Miles Han- 
son, First Church. Roxbury, Mass. 



MEMBER OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



CONDENSED STATEMENT 

as rendered to the Comptroller as of the close of Business Sept. 24, 1930 



RESOURCES 
Cash and Due from Banks. .$ 197.428.13 

U. S. Bonds 219..J70.94 

Other Stocks and Bonds ... 1,099.680.99 

Loans and Discounts 1,113.400.81 

Banking House 62,509.36 



LIABILITIES 

Capital $ 100.000.00 

Surplus and Profits 282.324.79 

Reserve for Taxes and In- 
terest 11,500.00 

Reserve for Amortization 

and Depreciation 32.727.95 

Deposits. Commercial 1.163.169.10 

Deposits, Savings 1.102,668.29 

$2,692,390.23 



$2,692,390.23 

Officers 

RALPH E. JOSLIN, President CHARLES E. BARRETT, Treasurer 

FREELAND E. HOVEY, Vice President G. DWIGHT CABOT, Assistant Treasurer 
FRED L. PATTEE, Vice President HELEN M. MONROE, Assistant Treasurer 



CHARLES E. BARRETT 
CUTLER B. DOWNER 
JKRE A. DOWNS 
GEORGE A. FERNALD 
HENRY C. GUERNSEY 



Directors 

H. WADSWORTH HIGHT 
FREELAND E. HOVEY 
RALPH F. JOSLIN 
JAMES NOWELL 



WILLIAM L. PARSONS 
FRED L. PATTEE 
EDWIN R ROONFY 
FREDERIC S. SNYDER 
CHARLES II. SYMMES 



CHURCH OP THE KPIPIIANY 

'I he Rev. Truman Ueminway, HI).. Rector. 

Phone, Win. 

11,'iieoncsH Helen P. Lane, Win. |!I!I6, 
I'aliali House. Win. 11)22. 



guests for luncheon are asked to notify Mrs. 
Hen Schneider Win. 1643, or Mrs. J. Churchill 
Hindes, Win. 06-1 1-J before Monday evening. 

Hostesses for the month of December are 
Mrs. A. II Stanton, Mrs. Halford Ambler. 
Mrs Arnold Whittaker ami Mrs. II. W. Ash. 



Cut any length (extra) 



. . 2.00 
S20.00 



Hard mountain growth dried under 
cover. Also, kimllng wood. $14.00 
and $16.00. ROGER S. BEATTIE, 
tel. Wob. (M39. a u29-tf 

POR SALE Sacrifice beautiful custom 
mad., living room »ct, odd chairs, handsome 
walnut dining room and bed room set gale 
he table, secretarj desk, radio, rugs, lamps, 
etc 253 Boston avenue, Medford, Suite 1. 
Home evenings after 7 p. m., all day Sunday. 

do-2t" 

POR SALE 6 passenger Jewett touring 
cur 192(1 sport model, in excellent condition, 
selling to dose estate May be seen at ill 
Washington street, Winchester, tel. 0,01-W. 



THREE PLY ROLL ROOFING 

*! 25 SLATE SURFACED 

Ashpalt Shingles (3.01) a square and up 

Black Sheet Steel Ash Cans 60c each 

i I a t White Paint $1.00 per gallon 

Hard. Dry Cord Wood $16.00 per cord 

II. M. ALPKRIN & CO, 
527 Concord Ave. Camb idge. Mass. 

Tel. Porter 1580— University (i6s» 

o31-18t 



Dec. 7 Second Sunday in Advent. 
Holy Communion, S it. in. 
C hurch School, 9:30 a. m. 
Litany. 10 :45 a. m. 
Holy Communion, 11 a. m. 
Kindergarten ami primary department, 



11 



FIREPLACE WOOD 

VERY FANCY, all cleft gixxl Sised white hirrh 
Ms per cord, -I ft. lengths; 120 sawed, maple 
ami oak $1" per cord, t ft. lengths. IIS 
sawed; kindling Wood fi Int. $1; l» nu. *8I 
88 htl. 16. All Wood may hf seen in yard at 
r.'J High street. Wohurn. Friisell Pros. tel. 
Wohum 0670. ali-tt 

FOR SACK Apples. Macintosh Reds, Bald- 
Win and Northern Spy. Walter II. Dotten, 
1(1 Alben street, Winchester. Tel. 072fi. so-tf 



MISCELLANEOUS 



CURTAINS AND DRAI'KKIKS All kinds 
made to order. We do hemstitchir g. Perry, 
lfi Pleasant street, Metlford Tel. Mystic 
0371-J " K - ,f 

BECONO MORTtJACR LOANS msde from 
our own funds. We also buy mortgage notes 
or lend on them as collateral We are not 
brokers and vour dealings are solely with us. 
Mystic Vallev Mortgage Co.. 7 Forest Street 
Medford. Phone Mystic 02r.fi. jaS-tf 

W ANTED '-.' or .1 unfurnished rooms for 
light housekeeping. American family. Write 
Star Office, Pox II. J. N. * 

WANTED Space in heated garage near 1« 
Cabot street Tel. Win. 0091. * 

RAND LAUNDRY Washing and ironing, 
work done at hem.' by experienced Swedish 
laundress Tel. Arlington 6609-W. ' 

MOTHER AT BUSINESS .luring day de- 
sire* room and hoard for herself and son <i\ 
years near Mystic School. Address Star Of- 
fice. Hon M. B ' 



ICE 

HORN POND ICE COMPANY 
Tel. Woburn 0310 



WANTED Woman for general cleaning 
one day a week. Tel. Win. I043-M 



WANTED Second hand bicycle for boy It 
years old. also electric train set. Tel Win 
2048. 



Frances Sabra Bisbee ami Clinton 
William Benson, both of Portland. Me., 
wore quietly united in marriage last 
Saturday evening by the Rev. Benja- 
min Patterson Browne of the First 
Baptist Church, the ceremony being 
performed at the home of the bride's 
sister. Mrs F. A. Young of 275 Wash- 
ington street. Only members of the 
immediate families were present. The 
wedding music was played by Mis* 
Madeline Young, Upon their return 
from a wedding journey Mr. Benson 
and his bride will make their heme in 
Portland, 



Phone Kfifi 



Kstablished 1HD1 



R. E. BELIVEAU 

Formertv A. E. Hergitrom 
UPHOLSTERING AND FURNITURE 
REPAIRING 
Cu.hion. Mattress and Shade Warh 

Refintshing 
l»eeorall»» Chairs Made to Order 
16 Th. mp«on St. Winchester. Msss. 



MORTGAGEE'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE 



Hv virtue and in execution of the power of 
sale contained in a certain mortgage given 
by Myer Cot/, i.. Agnes E. Martin, dated De- 
cember 12, 1027, and recorded in Middlesex 
South Uegistr) District, and being Document 
No. S3. 4113, and noted on Certificate of Title 
N.i 25,518, in Registration Hook 171, at page 
381, of which mortgage the undersigned is 
the assignee and present holder by an assign- 
ment date .Inly I", 1028, and being Document 
No. 02,776, and noted on Certificate of Title 
No. 25,018. for breach of the condition- of 
suit] mortgage and for the purpose of fore- 
closing the same will be sold at public auc- 
tion at 0:30 o'clock A. M. on the twenty- 
aeventh day of December, 1030, on the pivm- 
i-; s below described, all and singular the 
premises conveyed by -aid mortgage, said 
premises being therein described substantially 
as follows: 

The laud situated in Winchester, Middlesex 
County, Massachusetts, being bounded ami de- 
scribed as follows : 

Easterly by Main Street, one hundred fifty- 
two and '.17 in 0 1162.97) feet I Northerly by 
I ot A as shown on a plan hereinafter referred 
t... s. v, nty-live and I I 1 75.44) feet; East- 
erly again by said Lot A. as shown on said 
plan, ninety (90) feet! Northerly again, by 
Wtltel Street, one hundred nine and 2* 100 
i 109.27 1 feet. Westerly by land lie" or form- 
erly of John Cassidy, one hundred twenty 
ami 73 lull 1120.73) feet, ami by laud now or 
formerly of John Swyuicr, one hundred twen- 
ty (1201 feet. Southerly by Richardson Street, 
two hundred four and 70 Hit) (204.70) feet: 
containing forty thousand, four hundred 
(40.400) square feet of land more or less, and 
being Lots It, C, !>. E. K and il. :i- shown on 
a plan of "Subdivision of Lots, Winchester, 
Mass., March .'III. 1926", drawn by Parker 
llolbronk, Engineer, and filed in the Land 
Registration Office, a copy of which Is riled in 
the South Registry District of Middlesex t oun- 
ty. and referred to as Plan No. 11,060 H. 

Being the same premises conveyed to me 
by deed of even date of Agin s K. Martin, to 
I..- recorded in the South Registry District of 
Middlesex County. 

The above described premises are conveyed 
subject to a building line on said Water Street, 
established by the Town of Winchester, shown 
us Document No. 66,208 on Certificate of 
Title numbered 20,684, and also subject to 
tn\.s assessed by the Town of Winchester for 
the year 1027. Said premises arc also con- 
veyed subject to the restriction that no stores 

shall be e ret ted on said premises for a perioil 
of ten '1'" years from August 20, 1927. This 
restriction, however, shall not apply to a ga- 
rage, automobile salesroom, service or tilling 
station. 

There is excepted and excluded front the 

kbove-drscrihed parcel the following lots of 

land, Which have heretofore been released from 
said mortgage, namely Lots D, E and P, by 
partial releases duly recorded in said Middle- 
sex South Registry District, and noted on 
lertif.alf ot Title No. 25,518, in Registration 
Hook 171, at page 3M. 

Sat.l premises will be sold subject to nny 
and all unpaid taxes, tax titles and municipal 
liens or assessments, if any there be. 

Term- of sale: 1240.110 will be required to 
he paid by the purchaser at the time Hi d place 
of sab, and the balance in cash within ten 
days thereafter upon the delivery of the deed 

« II. 1 1 \M E. U VMSDEI.L 
Assignee and Present Holhr of sin, I Mortgage 

l . Congress Street, Boston, Mas*. 
December .(. 1030 d5-8t 



Evening Prayer, 5 p. m. 

Tuesday, Dec. !' Holy Communion, 0:30 
a. m. 

Wednesday, Dec. In Children's Service, ! 
p. m. 

Meetings 

Tuesday. Dec. 0, 10:16 a. m. Council, 
Church Service League. 

Tuesday, Dec. 0, 10-4; sewing meeting; 
luncheon 12:30, Speaker. Miss Charlotte 
Brown will talk of her work among the white 
settlers in Idaho .'in. I South Dakota. 

Wednesday, Dec. in, 6:30 p. m. Men's Club 
dinner; speaker. Mr. R. I-'. Stevens of Arthur 
D. Little, Inc., subject, "Moulding the lu- 
lu re." 

Friday, Dec. 12. 10:16 a. m. Mrs. Nicholas 
Burke, "The Life of Prayer." 



Crawford Memorial 
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

Corner Church and Dix 
Wesl Thompson, Minister, 
street. Tel. Win. 0530-M. 



streets 
Residence 



Rev, 
30 



J. 

tlx 



UPHOLSTERING AND 

FURNITURE REPAIRING 

CABINET. CUSHION. SHADE and 
MATTRESS WORK 

A. K. BERG STROM 

609 Main Street Tel. Win. 21 II 



l IRST CHURCH OP CHRIS1 

All Seats Free 



SCIENTIST 



Sunday, Dec 7 Subject, "Cod the Only 
Cause and Creator." 

Sunday School at 12 o'clock. 

Services in the Church Building opposite the 

I'own Hull. lo : I.", A. M 

Wednesday evening meeting ill 7:45 ]'. M. 

Rending room in Chinch Building. Open 
daily from 12 M. to G I'. M. except Siiimihjs 
mid holidays. 



The Church School meets at B :30 Sunday 
morning. Mr. Vincent P. Clarke, Supt. Men's 
Bible Class taught by Prof. Kenneth Reynolds. 
Other well equipped classes for all ages and 
a cordial welcome in any of tin in. 

Morning worship at 10:30. Sermon subject: 
"How We (lot Our Bible Its Sources, Devel- 
opment and Present Day Influence." Trum- 
pet solo by Mr. Cleon Hopkins, "Face to 
Face." by Johnson. 

Wednesday The prayer service of the 
church will be held at 7:46 p m. The Heav- 
enly Father's Love" is the topic for this sec- 
ond service in the Advent season. 

Thursday The ladies' t hureh Day will lie 
held in the church beginning with the meeting 
of the Women's Home Missionary Society at 
1 :30. The Ladies' Aid Society meeting will 
follow at 2:311. please notice that there will 
be no luncheon this week. • 

Friday Everyone who expects to sing ill 
the junior choir should be present at the re- 
hearsal at S:46. Measurements for the robes 
will be made. 

MORTGAGEE'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE 

By virtue of the power of sale contained 



AMERICAN GLASS COMPANY 
Glass For All Purposes 

MIRRORS RESILVERED 

369 Ferry St. Everett, Mass. 

Tel. Everett 0911 

Winchester Calls and Deliverim Twice 
Weekly 



MARBLE WORK 

Repairing, polishing ant! setting 
done at reasonable prices. 
CALL WIN. 0629-W 



Winchester, Mas*., Dec, 1. lUIII) 
TO THE HOARD OK SELECTMEN of 
THE TOWN OK WINCHESTER: The under- 
signed respectfully petitions for u license to 

keep 

t.ASOLINE 

In gallons in motor vehicles while in private 
2-car garage which garage is to I.. located 
tttl the Inn. I in said Winchester situated on 

Lebanon Street and numb red t" thereon, aa 
shown up. ii the plan tiled her. w ith and certi- 
Hrti that Ho names ami nddresaca of nil own- 
ers of record ,,f lund abutting the premises 
are as follow s • 

Abutters: Sarall .1. Clissidy. 40 Lebanon 

Strt.-t, Winchester. 

LORENCK M. WOODSIDE. 

42 Lebanon Street, 

Ti v n . f Winchester, In Hoard of Select- 
men. Dee. 1. 1030 On the foregoing petition 
ii i- herehj ORDERED that a public hearing 
thereon be held on Monday the IBth day of 
D eemher 1930 id 7:40 p m 111 the Selt'ct- 
m n'« Room in the Town Hill Building; that 
notice th. i. oi be given by u- u.t the expense 
of the applicant), by publishing a copy of said 
petition, together with this order, in the 
"Wnu In li r Star" at h ast seven days before 
s.od date and that notice of the tune and 
place of said hearing he given by the appli- 
cant by regis! I'd mail, not I. la I ban seven 
days prior to such hearing, to nil owners of 
leal estate abutting on the land on which 
such license, if grant., I. is to b« exercised. 

A true copy. 
Attest : 

OEOUGE S F. BARTI.ETT, 

(lik of Selectmen 



virtue ot tin- III 
a certain mortgage deed gi 
Sai turo to the Winchester C 
dated .Inly 3, 1922 and record 
sex South District Deeds. 



.'»(ui, for breai 
gage, and fo 



FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

Rev. Howard ,). Chid ley, D.D., Minister. 
Residence, Fernway. 
Mr. Jay A. 



Tel. Win. 0071. 
Wabeke, assistant 



Morning worship at 1(1:31). Dr. Chidley will 
preach on. "Life's Larger Loyalties." 

Sunday School Visitors are always wel- 
come. The departments meet as follows: 
111:311 to 11:46, kindergarten and primary de- 
partments; 9:20 to 10:20, junior department, 
grades 4, ."1 nnd (1. Ripley Chapel: 12 to 1. 
intermediate and senior departments, grades 
7 and >> and high school. Ripley Chapel. 

The Young People's Society will meet this 
evening at 0 in Ripley Chapel. Lucy Fowle 
will l>c the leader and Daniel West will s|,eak 
on. "Loyalty." 

Mid-week service on Wednesday evening at 
7:46. Dr. Sidney A. Weston will show motion 
pictures of Ins recent trip to Pale-line Mr 
Chidley will preside. An offering »ili be tuk- 

cn to defray expenses of the lecture. 

The Every Member Canvass for raising the 
church ami benevolence budgets for 193] will 
be made Sunday afternoon from J to ;, . clock 

Volley ball in the parish house Thursday 
evening at 7:80. All men of the church and 
congregation are heartily welcome. 

Group Five will hold a sala of home rooked 
food in the Kindergarten room on Tuesday, 
Bee. 9. 'rom 1 1 a. m. t,> 1 p. m. 

The Mission Union will met Tuesday, Dec. 
9, from in a. m. until 1 p. m. Hoard meet- 
ing at 11 o'clock. Those wishing to bring 



1 by Sal vn tore 
perativc Hank. 
1 with Middle- 
Hook 4636, Page ! 
h ..I' the conditions of said nn.rt- 
the purpose of foreclosing the 
same will lie sold at public auction on the 
premises hereinafter described on Monday. 
D ci niber 29, 1930 at nine o'clock in the fore- | 
i noon, all and singular the premises conveyed 
by said mortgage deed and therein substan- 
tially described as follows: 

"A certain parcel of land with the build- 
I ings thereon, situated in Winchester, said 
Middlesex County, being bounded and described 
j as follows : 

Beginning at the Southeast, rly corner uf | 
the premises on the Northerly side of Swan- 
ton Street at land now or formerly of Michael 
Flynn; thence Northerly by said Flynn land, 
about two hundred (200) feet to land former- 1 
ly of Warren Cutler ; thence Westerly by said 
Culler land and land formerly of Symmes. j 
about sixty (t'.tll feet; thence Southerly by) 
land now or formerly of Morris Haley, about 
two hundred 1200) f<vt t.. Swanton Street; 1 
thence Easterly by Swanton Street, about six- I 
ly inin feet to the point of beginning. 

Being the same premises conveyed to the 
I grantoit by Kaphaella Ficociello by deed of 
I even date to he recorded herewith." 
I Saul premises will be sold subject to all un- ! 
paid taxes, tax titles, assessments or other' 
municipal li. 11s. $100.00 in cash will lie re- 
1 united I,, be paid at the lime of the sale and 
the balance to be paid within ten (10) days' 
from the date of sab- at Room Hid. lu State ; 
Street. |t.,s(, .11, Mass. Other particulars made 
known at time of sale. 

WINCHESTER CO-OPERATIVE HANK. 

Mortgagee anil present holder | 
By Ernest R. Eustis. Treasurer 
For further information apply to Curtis W. | 
1 Nash, in State Street. Boston, Mass. d6-8t | 



»i«Hiiai«i mtimiiiiiiiioiimiiuioiii iiioiiiiiiiiiiiicniii iiiCTUiiiiiiniiruiHiiiiiiiKaimimwiuiiiituiiiiiaunHHtHaaiuituii'j 

I Week=End Special I 

i i 

CARNATIONS $1.00 Per Dozen— 2 Dozen for $1.50 

§ As advertised by The Allied Florists of New England § 

§ OTHER FLOWERS AND PLANTS AT MODEST PRICES I 



r 



■ 



i!:!::?ii!i::!:;::i.::g;; , „' , ^;!.;;:i;:::::::: , ::..:r:^ 1 :;: - . ^^ :: ^r 



0 



BILLAUERS 

Xmas Suggestions 



AN ALMOST 



ENDLESS 
YOUR 



VARIETY OF 
INSPECTION 



GIFTS AWAITS 




Take advantage c;f this oportuiuty to brighten your home 
with Flowers 



Winchester Conservatories 



INCORPORATED 



Main Store & Greenhouses 



It is not ton early to think about 
Christmas cards, printed with your 
name. A fine line is awaiting your 
inspection at the Star Office. 



186 Cambridge Stret-t 
I'hone*— \\ in. 1702, 0fi90 



Arnold Shop 

1 Common Stret-t 
Phone Win. 0205 



f 



Winchester 



DELTAH 
PEARL BEADS 

Always an ac- 
ceptable Gift. 
You will find 
here a selection 
of Pearl Beads 
from 50c to $100 

Wo Also Carry 

DELTAH 
PERFUMES 

from 85c to $35 
per bottle 

A large selection 
of general (Jift Nov- 
elties await your in- 
spection. 



I 

Gift that 
forgot- 



A DIAMOND 

from this store 




means an assur- 
ance of quality 
exactly as repre- 
sented. 



SETH THOMAS 
SPRING AND 
ELECTRIC 
CLOCKS 

We guarantee 
Our Reputation every clock that 
proves the above ,eaves tnis store - 
statement. W e WATCHES 
shall be delighted m a y be bought 
to show you our nere w • t h the 
satisfaction o f 
knowing that 
Expert's Guaran- 
of 



selection of dia- 
mond and colored 
stone rings in our fee is ba c k 
stock. every watch. 

A NEAT LITTLE CHRISTMAS CARD FREE WITH 
EACH PURCHASE 

Henry Billauer 

From a Family of Jewelers for Over 100 Years 



327 MAIN STREET 



WOBURN, MASS. 




THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, DECEMBER ,5. 1930 



WINCHESTER WOMEN'S REPUB- 
LICAN CLUB 



CHRISTMAS BAZAAR 



The regular monthly meeting of the 
Women's Republican CIui> wa? held 
•?tt Association Hall, Vine street, 
Wednesday, Dec. at 2:30 p. m. 
There was a short business meeting 
«lurintf which Mrs. Scales, our mem- 
bership chairman reported six new 
members. .Mrs. Dabney, our Educa- 
tion chairman, then introduced Mrs. 
Joseph Ryan, who urged everyone to 
help in welfare work. She spoke es- 
pecially of aiding mothers of depen- 
dent children, telling how little money 
they have and how badly help is 
needed to bring them to a little higrh- 
•er standard of living. She stated that 
unemployment makes it especially 
hard at this time and if anyone can 
help in any way to get in touch with 
her or any member of the Welfare 
Hoard. Mrs. Idabelle Winship ren- 
dered two different groups of songs 
which were very delightful and much 
enjoyed by all those present. 

The speaker of the afternoon was 
Mrs. Alfred Radley, our past presi- 
dent, whose subject was "Trippuig 
Through the Tropics," with pictures. 
Her talk opened with pictures of 
<'ey'en and Rangoon, showing the 
beautiful temples, interesting street 
scenes a^ well as native costumes and 
life. Sin- c ho wed the elephants work- 
ing and lifting the teak woo! log.s at 
the tcakwood mill, This was fol- 
lowed by pictures of Siam. Singa- 
pore and Columbo, the famous emer- 
ald Buddha on the temple, the 
Friendship palms around the temple 
and the beautiful flowers in the botan- 
ical gardens . t .lava. All the native- 
life was so interesting anil unusual. 
'I here were pictures of Manilla, the 
native huts and coeuanut groves, 
showing how the cocoanuts are picked 
and broken, Then came pictures of 
Japan depicting the different cos- 
tumes of the people, the it thatched 
houses, their interest ing costumes, 
picture? of Yokohama. Tokio and na- 
tive towns showing the life of the 
Japanese people. The fact that these 
pictures wen all taken by Mrs. Rad- 
ley during a recenl trip to the Trop- 
ics made them especially enjoyable 

as she included many of her personal 
experiences and observations, Tea 
and it social hour was enjoyed after 
the meeting. 



The Ladies' Friendly Society held 
! its annual Christmas Bazaar at 2 p. 
m., Tuesday. Dec. 2, in the Unitarian 
parish house. 

The chairman, Mrs. Ralph T. Da- 
mon, Mrs. George Goddu, and Mrs. 
j Charles E. Young, assisted by a larne 
number of society members, had pro- 
vided 12 tables most festive and ap- 
propriate for the Christmas season. 
Aprons, baskets, flowers, handker- 
; chiefs, infants' apparel, bags and 
; other holiday articles were on sale 
during the afternoon and evening. 
The proceeds from the bazaar were 
highly gratifying to the committee 
and members. 

Tea was served during the after- 
noon and at 6:45 p. m. there was a 
supper in Metcalf Hall for members 
[of the parish. Mrs. Theodore R. God- 
win anri Mrs. Jesse S. Wilson deserve 
I much praise for their work as chair- 
men in providing so excellent a sup- 



per and in arranging so attractively 
the table decorations of yellow and 
green. 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 

Frank Rounds and Norman Dal- 
rymple who are at Andover this year 
spent the Thanksgiving holidays with 
their respective parents, 

Mr. George Montgomery, Jr. of 
New York City was the guest of Mr. 
and Mrs. R. V. Pettingell last week- 
end. 

Mr. Allen H. Wood, formerly of 
this town and well known here, has 
been re-elected president of the Bos- 
ton Automobile Club, local unit of 
the American Automobile Association. 
Mr. Wood is president of Wood, Put- 
nam & Wood, one of New England's 
oldest advertising agencies and a man 
] lon« active on the Board of Gover- 
nors of the Boston Automobile Club. 

Mrs. Archibald C. Jordan, chairman 
of the committee on National De- 



fense of the D. A. T., spoke last week 
before the Lexington Chapter on mat- 
ters pertaining to the work of her 
1 committee. 

j Those who like a bit of nonsense on 
■ their Christmas cards will be pleased 
' with the McEvoy box at the Star 
' Office. 



GLOVES at BARNES 



S A I ION ARMY DIMS E 



The annual Salvation 
for $20011 for Winchestei 
ing on and about $1200 n 



Am 



v drive 
'till go- 
as been 
fsnii yet to come. 
14, Moulton, chair- 



ai 



d Charles E. 
if this appeal is- 
statement today: 
story of the Sal- 
great Army de- 
of alleviating 
ir, and the 
appeal for f; 



the 
out- 
inds 



1 here I 
forces of 

may grow, 
impending 
and the 
t housands. 



subscribed. Over 

I. lent. -Co|. Paul 
man of this appc; 
Barrett, treasurer 
sued the following 

"Never in the h 
vat i. n A i my, t hat 
voted to the work c 
condition of the pti 
cast has the need of 
to cany on its work heen greater 
than it is now. The average man and 
woman cannot help being aware of 
the frightful condition in which too 
many wage earners are finding them- 
selves, at the present time, when it 
is impossible for them to connect 
themselves with jobs, and when, as a 
consequence, thousands are starving 
in the midst of plenty. A starved 
body can be accomplished only by a 
weak mill I, 

i grave danger that the 
•ommunisni and anarchy 
and that rapidly with the 
increase of unemployment 
consequent starvation of 
perhaps hundreds of thou- 
sands, in our very midst. 

"When we think of this wonderful 
work done by this splendid organiza- 
tion; when we reflect that the increase 
in unemployment and business depres- 
sion have brought unusual demands 
upon it, when we are aware that the 
relief work now carried on, is the 
greatest in the history of the Salva- 
tion Army in and about Winchester; 
when we contemplate a winter this 
year which the demands will he un- 
usually heavy, we cannot help mak- 
ing a most powerful appeal to the 
more fortunate of our fellow citizens 
to see to it that this great work is not 
curtniled, but on the contrary, is 
helped to do greater and better than 
it has ever done before. 

"Help US to put this drive 'over the 
top,' within the next week. 

"You cannot give too quickly, for 
starvation, the enemy of society, is 
at the gates. 

"Give now. please!" 

Sincerely yours. 
Lieut-Col. Paul I!. Moulton, 

( 'haii man < f Advisory B >ard 
Charles E. Barrett. 
Ti ensure r of the Drive 



CALUMET NOU S 



lay aft irno >n, D 
n oi idore at th - 
in - a large crow 
lardson and Mrs. 1 
char«»e and mad • v 



i 



l tne lirst i 

>. w«i8 at- ! 
Har- 

Pri le ! 



o 



charm- 



it 



Tt 

nftemn :i ! at t:i • 'ill 

tended 
lis R'i 
were i 

in, host ss.-s. 

Next Monday, Dec 8. Cal 
will go to Mald»n and nlav K •rtuvo >d 
Club in the Mystic Valley League 
Come a'o-M- with th b us Bnd he!r> 
them t ) stay at the ti p. 0 i • of the 
outstnndirg matches last Monday was 
to see Wa'ter Chamb rlin plaving 
billiards for Calumet against Med- 
ford Club This was the ftrst time 
in live years that Wnltpr has placed 
since he carried off th > honors : n the 
billiard tournament. We shou'd not 
iforget Fr d Begien the official I'ne 
man in the allies. The team always 
wins with Fred on the line. 

Friday Dee 19 at 8 o'clock. Calu- 
met dancing party. 50c o ticket Make 
these d'neitv; parties t»o over big 

New Year's ratty. We In s lay even 
injr. Dec 31. The committee with W 
A Wilde chairman is planning one 
of the larg 'St and the b< t parties of 
the year. 

D' n't mak" any oth r engagements 
vnt ; l you bear about th : s nprtv. 
"Jack" Hennessey's dance orchestra 
has been engaged for thia big time. 

Henrv C. Quirbach, who died Sat 
urday in Lowell w is tv. » broth 0 * »f 
Rev. Fr. Conrad J. Quirbach of St. 
Man's Parish. The funeral was held 
"Tuesday morning in St Margaret's 
Church, Lowell, and there were many 
Winchester people at the service. 



RANDA 

Week - End Specials 



FOUNTAIN SPECIAL 

To introduce our new Lakewood Ice Cream ($1.00 quart 
brick) we will give FREE 1 lb. of our own Home- 
Made Candies. 



ICE CREAM SPECIALS 

Orange-Pineapple Maple Walnut 

Raspberry Sherbet 



CANDY SPECIAL 

Molasses Creoles (rich and delicioss) 49c lb. 

We have Specials every day in our Luncheonette Depart- 
ment. 

TEL. WINCHESTER 0515 



Imagine your embarrassment 

WHFM YOU*V£ BEEKI 
B^AGG-ING- ABOUT 
WHAT YOU'D DO IF 
YOU WEEE 
HELD UP - 




IMAGINE YOUR DELIGHT— in having your Fine Linens- Lunch- 
eon Sets — Colored Embroidered Table Runners Spreads and Shams 
(leaned and beautifully finished — then properly wrapped so they 
will not crease or wrinkle, all ready for the coming holidays. 

We are doing a lot of this high grade work— the kind of work you 
hesitate to send out without feeding very confident that it is going 
to be well done and carefully handled by a responsible concern. 
We also are particularly well equipped to handle Fine Laces of all 
kinds, whether made up in Luncheon Sets — Dollies or Bed Sets. 

All Articles reasonably priced. 

E & R CLEANSING and DYEING COMPANY 

SMART ST. at 209 MASS. AVE. 
TELEPHONES UNIVERSITY 1170-4171-4172 
CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 

INCORPORATED 1908 



Come in and ask for PROOF of every statement in this advertisement 



•tS^i." 1 Aim* . 

JA " i /Winiiliiinriiii 



a 




koc-l'^ halt 3l 
* LilioTu poixnda oi "Hot 
logs are cate^x -yearly 
isx thxs U.S. 




-■ . .* J ' ■ ■ i 

Twemu; nine r Lctcilxavc j 
a. toturt b-y th.3 rum-ip i 
cf Cleveland,- ! 



~mjl i£ ?J ' PtGrAN 
■^g&WC' \VO UNO M.'' 



m 




axx z. serial 
'.cry tax 22yc<u& 




y ... Jk0- 

/ 

^TkeWoild's Cjeat 
est. oystcr-opeLxrr 
io tlvc start lih. / 



( ALL at our office and receive one of our Feature Calendars, or 
call us by Phone and we will deliver one to your home. 

P L FOLEY 6c ^O. 

PLUMB ING- AND M EATI NG- CONTRACTORS 

^j4// #o66/s2c? /?rv/7?p/ti/ aflc/rabtffy 

599 MAIN STREET WINCHESTER. MASS- 

SHOP— Tel. Win. 1492 RES. — Tel. Win. 1726 



Good's 
Riding School 

Harry Good, Prop. 

Well Broken Horses 
and Ponies 

Personal Supervisiom 

MAIN STREET MEDFORO 

(Near Oak Grove Omvtary 

Tel. Mystic 3802 



Announcement 

In response to repeated questions, I wish to announce 
that my establishment is still open for business at its 
original location, 15 Thompson Street. 

For the same expert service 

PHONE WINCHESTER 1766 

R. E. BEL1VZAU 



Upholsterer 

Successor t<> A. E. Bergtrom 




Our Modern, Completely Equipped Funeral Home and Chapel 

KELLEY & HAWES CO. 

jfUnetal IDirCCtOVS Lady Assistants 
Service Available Anywhere in New England PHONES: WINCHESTER 0035- 0174, 0106 



A 



ItH.MU 




THE NEW CHEVROLET SIX 

Strikingly beautiful, fivvt ami ttmart 
—a master pi vvv of Fisher styling 




Never has the supe- 
riority of Body by 
Fisher heen more 
strikingly exemplified than in the 
Bigger and lletter Chevrolet Six! 

With the added advantage of a 
lengthened wheelbaae, Fisher de- 
signers have achieved in the new 
Chevrolet an impressive degree of 
smartness, comfort and luxury. 

Inside and out, scores of refine- 
ments stamp this car as a mas- 
terpiece of modern coachwork. 
Radiator, headlamps and tie-bar 
form an unusually attractive and 
distinctive ensemble. Mouldings 
sweep ( >ack in an unbroken line 
to blend with the smart new body 
contours. And new color com- 
binations lend a new individual- 



ity. Interiors, too, are excep- 
tional. The new mohair and 
broadcloth upbolstery is smartly 
tailored. Seats are wider and 
more luxuriously cushioned. A 
deeper windsiueld and w ider win- 
dows give better vision. And 
beautiful new modern fittings 
lend a final note of charm. 

Many mechanical improvements 
are also evident in this Bigger 
and Better Six. Among these are 
a stronger frame; easier steering; 
a more durable clutch; a quieter, 
smoother transmission; and im- 
portant engine refinements. 

The Bigger and Better Chevrolet 
Six is now on display. Sec it today 
— drive it! It is the Great Ameri- 
can Valuel 



» :> AT NEW LOW PRICES « « 



The 

I'harton 



The 

Koadater 



Sport Koadater 
with rumble neat 



'510 
'475 
'495 



The 

C'oarh 

Standard 

Coupe 

Standard Fi»e- 
Window Coupe 



S P E C I A I. E Q V IPMENT 

Chevrolet Trurk, from $3:..'i 



'545 
535 
'545 

EXTRA 



Sport Coupe 
with rumble aeat 

Standard 

Sedan 



Special 
Sedan 



5 575 
'635 
'650 



mi vitoi i i 



IT'S WISE TO CHOOSE A SIX 

FRANK MURPHY, Inc. 



748 MAIN STREET 



TEL. WIN. 0293 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS.. STAR, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1930 



7 



The police were called last Friday Emma J. I'rinee. Chiropodist, Mas- 

to stop a group of youngsters who seuse. hours 'J-\i. closed Wed- 

were coasting down Stone avenue on- nesday afternoons. Tel. Win. 0155. 

to Washington street. 13 Church street. slJ-tf 



The Jordan-Wakefield Co. 

< hair Hakrn (or 10 Year* — A K i. CONTINUING I UK IK 

FACT ORY SALE 
OF FINE REED AND RATTAN FURN1TUP.E 

Bold l>irerl from r art»>r> to } uu 

AT UNPARALLELED VALUES 
Consisting <>f Living Room Suite*., Sun Room Suites. Individual 
Pieces anil Novelties. As an example we offer 
LIVING ROOM SUITES — $35-1200 

Thin Btoefc In the Kin*** I We Manufacture 

DO YOUR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING HERE! 
Rear No. 338 .Main Street, Wakefield, Mass— Opp. Public Library 

DELIVERY SI.KVlii: n28-4t TEL. CRYSTAL 0S06 




from Florence was contributed by 
Miss Amy S. Bridgman in the form of 
a necklace and bracelet which were 
made by members of the house of 
Cappini which still exists in Florence. 
The original pieces of jewelry of 
which these are reproductions are 
now on exhibition in the Pitti Palace 
in Flu rent e. 



HELD HEARING ON STMMES 
PARK WATER TANK 



Gathering Recommended Removal- 
Scored Town Officials 



■i iT BBeaBsa^diiis^figeganwrii ■ 




BEAI Ti l l. ECONOM i 
nno i x r admired th.- aptwaxance 
molKhtly radiators. Everyone aa- 
. the beauty of CAtb ttadiator 
MurCK. Made "f Am. ' lnut'jrc 
, I j > ,»r**Y*Mtt wiiroiiw an-l Crack* 
fr m th.- Ii at and Ailt'u'ly fin- 
i i i- v M'lil • the finest of wood*. 
\I.K R»rliiit<c E*cloaure» throw 
... hewt i.ut into th.- room away 
iim the wall This keeps walla and 
iiv t ' i eli hi), thereby pljminatinK 
d, rnratinir coata, Katlm&tea theer- 

i U.E METAL PRODUI TS CO. 
u stua i 8t, Boston, Mans. 

Hancock 0693 



Wismprmo he thrifty 



/he Price tomes Dowl 
on Flain Silk Dresses 




1 



gives your sill* dress- 
es a > uperior ch aris- 
ing and pressing — 
doing the work ii 
look $1.50 to do be- 
fore! 



winter coats $i 

i fur tf.niTtM '1 extra) 

MEN'S SUITS .. $1 
6 NECKTIES . . 75c 
FUR COATS $3.5u "» 



WORKS AT MALDEN 



MALden 2000 



GOLDEN BELL 
Cleaners — Dyers 



W$ thrifty to call Qolden Bell 



FORTNIGHTLY NOTES 

At the meeting of the club on Mon- 
day, Dec. 8, there will be presented 
for the first time a three-act play by 
Carolyn Draper Gilpatric, a member 
of the Fortnightly, entitled "French 
Doors." Other plays and sketches 
by Mrs. Gilpatric have previously 
been much enjoyed by members of 
this dub as well as many more dis- 
tanl audience-. Mrs. Lillian A. R. 
Whitman, chairman of the Dramatic 
Committee, has coached the play. An 
experienced director of amateur pro- 
ductions in co-operation with the 
author of the play surely promises a 
perfoi niancc of the highest level when 
issisted by unstinted patience and 
hard work by tin members of the 
cast. The characters in "French 
Doors" will be played by Mr-. Thel- 
ma B'>othby, Mrs. Helen Fessenden, j 
Mrs. Doris Hills, Mrs. Pearle Miller, 
I s. Th Ima Pitman, Mrs. Muriel 
Trout, Mrs. Ada von Rosenvinge and 
Mrs. Dorothy Wills. The meeting is 
public. 

An interesting discussion of the 
work "Coronet" by Manuel Kamroff | 
was enjoyed by mumbers of the Lit- 
erature ('.roup, lead by Miss Mary 
!.. Hodge and Mrs. Helen H. Murray, 
in the afternoon "f Dec 1. A brief 
sketch of the life of the author was 
furnished by Mrs. Arzillio M. Hig- 

>, . Mi Hodge commented on the 
theme of the novel and Mrs. Murray 
gave a summary of the action. Miss 
Hodge quoted from numerous parts 
of the book, giving especially the 
background of the first episode de- 
scriptive nf the shop of the artist 
craftsman, Cappini, a worker in gold 
and precious jewels, a fascinating 
character representing a nobility of 
craft. Hire were introduced the 
coronet and the whip which appear 
as connective forces in the narrative., 
Comparisons were made of the char- 
acters of Rocco, Cappmi's sharp and 
dishonest apprentice who afterwards 
goes into the hog-butchering business, 
and the Chicago pork capitalist, 
George Mallet, the little Napoleon of 
modern industry. Emile Jobey, the 
street scavenger of Senlis, was men- 
tioned as one of the vivid characters 
of the novel. Mis. Murray followed 
Miss Hodge v ith two of the most 
tellingly descriptive scenes of the 
book, the death of Chopin, and the 
extreme cold of a Russian winter. 
The afternoon proved altogether too 
short for a full discussion of and re- 
flection on the many picturesque 
scenes noted in the presentation, 

An interesting bit of background 



HOME FOR AGED PEOPLE 

Donation ami Thanksgiving Days 
arc underlined on the November 
"Home" calendar. 

Although in theory. Donation Day 
would seem to specialize — in prac- 
tice, it includes the 365 days of the 
year, as is evidenced by this past 
year's record. 

Since Sept. I, 66 individual people 
and seven groups, including many 
more people, have materially con- 
tributed to the Home supplies of food. 

This not i nly -hows an Increasing 
interest, but a growing responsibility 
and local pride, in its success as an 
ongoing institution; and it was forth- 
coming, under no stress of special 
solicitation. 

For several years a gift sales table 
has been a feature of the Donation 
Day. Attractive articles, moderately 
priceel, have seemed to find favor with 
discriminating buyers, and as a re- 
•n!t, together with money given, this 
year netted over $400 — no insignifi- 
cant sum for the few people who work 
for it. 

No guest book is kept; but the 

yearly calls total many hundreds. 

Tin- Directors cordially* invite to 
the attention of those who are not a* 
yet acquainted with the Home to this 
invitation to visit and inspect it.^ 
work. 

And they also wish to extend in no 
perfunctory manner, but with heart- 
felt gratitude, its thanks for the gen- 
erous help 'd* the many people who 
contribute to its success 



NOTICE 

I wish to announce that the paint- 
ing and decorating business previous- 
ly conducted by David A. Cathie of 
Winchester has been purchased by 
Tore li. S. Johnson, one of Mr. Car- 
lue's former employees. Mr. John- 
son will continue to have associated 
with him John No] on and other men 
who have been with Mr. Carlue for 
many years, and whose excellent 
werk is so well known to many Win- 
chester residents. For the present, 
\!r, Johnson will keep his headquart- 
er 1 at Mr. ('mine's former residence 
with the same t< lephone number, 
Winchester 1701. Any calls for in- 
side or outside decorating at that 
numbi r will receive the same prompt 
and efficient service as heretofore, 
ami by the same skilful mechanics. 
Geo. 1!. Hayward, Executor 
for David A. Carlue 

Nov. 28, 1030 



Diaries at the Star Offie 



TODAY . . . Two New Cars Now Ready • • . TODAY 



TAe GR.EATER*. 




[COACH £895) 



i OTHER r.OOY MODUS AS ATTRACT! VeLY PRJCID 



2- PASS. 
COUPE 

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT EXTRA 




ALL PRICES F. O. B. DETROIT 



Astounding prices 




The hearing, held Monday evening 
by the Symmes Park Water Tower 
Committee, attracted a gathering 
which completely tilled the small town 
hall, and resulted in the passing of a 
sense of the inciting vote to remove 
the tank, erected t n Cranston road, 
and to provide water facilities for 
that district by laying an additional 
pipe line on Highland avenue. 

There was noticeable unanimity nf 
opinion at the hearing. If th.' tower 
or tank had any friends in the hall, 
they were reticent in >tating their 
views. All the speakers favored the 
■ removal of the structure, various 
schemes being advanced as alterna- 
j tives for providing the necessarj 

water supply now housed in the tank, j 
' I hairman .1. Harper blaisdell of 
the Symmes Park Water Tower Com- 
mittee presided at the hearing and 
Charles R. Mam served as secretary., 
i Speaker.-- were asked to give their I 
'names, hut there were several v. ho j 
' neglected to do mi. 

I Doctor Blaisdell opened the hearing j 
j with a brief outline of the situation 
as it exi.-ts. giving six possible solu- i 
) lions for the tank problem. He stated 
I that hi.- committee bad found that | 

! Hie water housed in the tank is ne, 

i sary for fire protection in the Syn - ] 

, l'ark section, and added that the 
(structure is undoubtedly the cheap- 
est and most effective means of pro- 
viding tiii- supply, Hi- committee 
■in studying the situation found six 
courses of action open to the town, ' 
I First the tOWi l" can !>■■ left alone and 

permitted to stand as erected; 2nd, i 
! the ground about tin tank can be 
beautified at an estimated cost of' 
$4000; Mid, tile tank can he screened 
with trees and shrubberj at an es- j 
timatcd cost of $20,000; 4th, the lo- 
cation of the lank can be chanced; 
5th, the tank can he replaced with a 
pipe line on Highland avenue at an 
estimated cost of $50,000; and 6th. an 
ornamental -hell of concrete or ma- 
sonry can he placed about the tank 
at an estimated co t of from $25,000 
to $30,(100. 

Mr. Fox followed Doctor Blaisdell 
and .--poke at some length, lie felt 
that, the Symmes Park section had 
not been sufficiently informed of the 
project to elect the tank in advance 
of tin.' meeting which voted to erect 
,t. and believed that in the Ion;; inn 
the town will lose money in property 
depreciation and loss of tuxes try pel 
initting it in remain in its present 
location. Ho felt that tin- plan to 
replace the tank with a pipe line was 
sound, and that it could he done for 
considerably h -- than the $50,000 
mentioned by Doctor Blaisdell, read- 
in- a bid of $32,000 for th" job which 
he had secured from a contractor. 
Mr. Fi \ luel gone into the matter 
rather deeply and read figures which 
supported his contention that tie- 
town will gain financially by remov- 
ing the tank. 

Dunne his remarks the speaker 
asked Doctor Blaisdell to read the 
report of the Boar 
was appealed to ; 
erection of the tower 

ienio\ e the st ructu re, 
n ad crit icised the \v. 
Hoard, tie- Planning 
Finance Committee fo 
the tower in its prese 
liic members of t he IJ 
peal were unable to 
remove 
ace to 
lal I,, l 

Mr. Comma fo 
that he I 
try to do 
■. and not 
felt thai 
e in plai 
ocation, i 
uld he r 
man c< 



1 of Appt al which 



' Ii 



1 1 mi 
in an i 
This r 
iter an 
I ina rd 
r havin 



of the 

•tll.lt to 

sport as 
I Si Wei- 



ll, 



staled 
should 
poss'" 

he. 



U..,-*.^:~i.-...-... mmi)amsL^>^Sm 



it 

ird of the Ap- 
rder she tank 
because it Was not a men- 
alth, a ion am e or di trimen- 
□perty, 

lowed Mr. Fox and 
■It that tin- town 
things as well as 
as cheaply as may 
the town had made 
ing the tower in its 

tnd believed the mis- 
■ctitied, just as any 
rrects an error its 

He stated 
ic status wa 
whole section 

a mistake in 



lie 

a mist a 
present 

lake sh 

business 

soon as possjbli 
Windiest ' r's eh 
high to permit a 
town to suffer foi 



that 
too 
f the 

judg- 
■ that much 
in beautify- 



"IVe invade a new field wifrh vastly 
improved cars c? fhe lowest prices in our history" 

BY WILLIAM J. McANEENY 

President, Hudson factor Car Company 

vVe have built these mode'.s up to and beyond the 1931 
standards of performance ar.d quality in every way, and 
have never in our history oCered so many improvements. 
Quality is greater down to the last detail. Every phase of 
performance has been greatly improved, and the luxury we 
have built into the cars ts substantially greater than ever 
bciore. Motors are !art;er and more power' til. An efficient 
system of oil cooling is introduced A marked improvement 
in carburction increases flexibility and economy Bodies are 
longer and wider. These cars possess the finest, easiest riding 
qualities. For the first time, such comfort is available at 
these low prices Only great mancdactunn^ economies and 
the tact that our large resources permit us to take the fullest 
rci;e:t:e advantage ot reduced commodity prices have en- 
abled us to oiler the puc'.ic the greatest combination of qual- 
ity and low prices in our enure history. 



Owner-Managemenr Permits 
Exclusive Value Advantages 

Owner-management enables Hudson* 
Ess;** to give you outstanding -id- 
vanta*»eji in quality <«nd pnee. The 
men who are now guiding its destinies 
have been with the company since its 
inception rwentv-two years jgo. Its 
department heads and principal dis- 
tributors are its controlling owners. 
Their independence is hacked by un- 
usually large resources in capital and 
plant facilities It enable* Hudson* 
Essex to lead in design and engineer- 
ing qualitv. It permits economies in 
manufacture and distribution that 
bring ejueptional quality direct to the 
public M distinct price advantages. 



Ceo both new cars at these places today: 

WATLER H. DOTTEN 



10 ALBEN STREET 



TEL. WIN. 0726 



ment , an I did not bel 
headway Could he ma 
illg the present structure. 

.Mr. K'-ndall of the Wati r and Sew- 
er Board stated that in his opinion 
the whole tank could he done away 
with by adding 25 feet to the height)! 
of the present pressure tank at the 
North Reservoir. The same results 
could be obtained in this way he be- 
lieved. 

Mr. Sanderson arose and said that 
the Water and Sewer Hoard was will- 
ing to do whatever the town wanted 
done in the matter, hut did not con- 
cur with Mr. Kendall, stating that 
what was needed in the Symmes 
Park section was water and not tires- 
sure. He also reminded the gather- 
ing that, no opposilion had been 
voiced to the erection of the tank 
when the matter was brought up in 
the town meeting. 

Mr. Bryne held the Water and 
Sewer Hoard accountable for the 
present situation, and favored the 
expending of $50,000 for a new main 
mi Highland avenue. 

Mr. Comins added to his original 
remarks by stating that the construc- 
tion of the tank in its present loca- 
tion had been put over by the Water 
and Sewer Board, and that if the peo- 
ple of the section in which it stands 
j had known of the project, there 
would have been a storm of opposi- 
tion. He stated that the town was 
spending some $40,000 to beautify 
I the vicinity of Wedge Pond and did 
i not believe that the money necessary 
, tn remove the tower from Cranston 
J road would involve a heavy tax bur- 
den. 

Mr. Lunt addressed the chair as a 
poll tax payer, and wanted the "mon- 
strosity" removed, statine that the 
sooner this is done, the better the 
citizens will be pleased. 

Mr. Whorf of the Water and Sew- 
i r Board resented the word "mon- 
strosity" and warned the meeting 
that it would jrain nothing by ridi- 
cule and rancor. 

Former Selectman Worthen was 
the next speaker, and his remarks did 
much to clarify an awkward situa- 
tion. He stat'-d that he favored the 
removal of the tank, hut he also 
agreed heartily with Mr. Whorfs ad 
monition. He felt that Mr. Sander- 
son and his Roard had done a fine 
job, that the Planning Board had giv- 



tn the matter careful consideration 
md that the Finance Committee had 
acted in the matter as u.s members 
deemed best for the town as a whole, 
lie believed that the three bodies had 
information at their disposal which 
made them better informed on tile 
whole matter than any at the hear- 
ing, and that they had" acted as they 
theujrht for the best interests of the 
community. The Water and Sewer 
board had prepared a must compre- 
hensive report of us findings and had 
caused each family in Winchester to 
receive a copy by inserting it in tho 
town report. No one had any right 
t-« say or to believe (hat the th.n:>- 
had been -p i over." The whole pro- 
ject was handled a- every town pro- 
ject must be bandied, and tin- pei pie 
of the Symmes Park district had 
one but themselves to blame if t ley 
did not inform th. m - Ives fu Ij en I, 
matter which ., . tally concerned 
them. In cloi .• ■ tV.t that the 
matter was 01 - w .i.-.i ,-dsouhl he fact o 
frankly and v. - t animosuj , an . 
ah >ve all felt thai I -t should h i 
necessary for u • tew n to -i 
$25,000 to get its citizens to read .;. 
town reports and luioVi what tin 
town oftic als an doing, the n o 
will be well spent. 

Mr. Fox still fell that the |i 
should have Ik hi In!: r informed 
and reiterated his colltenl vn that ' . 
■ main be laid alutig Highland avetna 

I McDoi a 
; interested in how the tank ;•. : w 
, it is. but was particularly coueeri 
| with its i-i :no\ al. A an arch 
| W orkipg in the \ ic hit y he fell | ' ; 
the pxeatcsl damage done by the tank 

would In 111! ■. ' 

since desirable buyers cannot b 
cured with the tan : it now: si i 
Ik' bowed ] : : ' ■ ipporl 
. ■• : . ' .it. 

He wa 

i 

ty i riencei 
■ > 
Mr. Heath propo e . thai i lie m i 
i i .i 

a I ' .!' : i . lai 
of a water main on Highland avell le. 
M r. i 'ullen t hen to I !:•■ (tooi a - 
stated 1 hat t lie work of laying I 
ma n should be done ; I em ■ to i 
iieve ii iu in ; loynient, 

.'dr. i lleason ft It ! hal i he mall 
;i I way to a 
I . ■ i la I ■ . ill ■- - I 

UOt 1 > 

tin robin 

V f I 

■ or, a seiisi f I 

passed as proposed by .Mr. II v 
Mr \ ■ i - e o ■ ■ ■ ■ . 
i • H llhi I v mi 
would report, and was told al I hi 

. I ■ ; : I'owil ' 1 ' 

ivanted t o ■ i 

RCl i'H! :i\ t hot me ting and I loci i 

Blaisdell fell that matters won 

' ' o ... tl 

I irne. The mi el 
i" ... 

WIN! HES'I EH GAR VCiK M \N 
V\ i S'S MAINE '. ERDH T 

Awarded si.,.(i(ni in Superior Court 
for Loss of I. ill Arm 

f ; : L. T'»l 

well known lo lot a! motorist ■ a i 
"l.uie," ;:;i employee at the Will 
chester Garage, »;i awarded §l r >,0 
damages by a jury in Superior ( »u i 
at Portland, Mo., last Saturday f u 

i I'ti's ■ la - , lleac 

Me., last March. Tomlinson lost hi 
Ii ft a. -hi n a peculiar accident in 
which he figured with a truck, owned 
by Clement Brothers of Portland, de- 
fendants in the recently concluded 
case. 

The young garage Irian was dr \ 
in}.;' along i le- highway, and nttei 
I a sing a big true!; fell a numbtu 
iti hi- le.'i arm. Upon looking, tie 

found that tnv arm had been pull- 
from Its socket, lie was taken I 
ihe We Is lie pitai an t eventual!; 
recovi red. 

A check-up of i he accident revealed 
the fee 1 thai a heavy truck owned by 
Clemen! Hrnthers had passed nlong 
tho highway at the time of the acc' 
dent and Tomlinson bri ught suil ;' 
$50 000 damages. 

T'ne suit was contested by the d 
fondants who claimed that Tomlin- 
son was guilty of contributory negP 
gence In driving with his arm out i f 
the window. The Winchester youne. 
man testified that he had both hands 
on tic wheel and that his left elbow 
only was out of the window. His 
counsel showed that the truck had a I 
overhanging body. 

After Ihe testimony, counsel for 
ihe defendants petitioned for a di- 
rected verdict for his clients, which 
th.- judge denied. The case went to 
the jurv. an I after two hours delib 
eration, a verdict of $15,000 was ren- 
dered. The defendants appealed. 

HOWARD— DINEEN 



The marriage of Miss Mary (' 
Dineen, granddaughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Andrew Dineen of Swanton 
street and Joseph W. Howard, son of 
Mrs. .1. W. Howard Callanan of Al 
len road. tool, place on the afternoon 
of Thanksgiving Hay in St. Mary's 
Rectory with the Pastor of St. Mary's 
Church. Rev. Fr. Nathaniel J. Merritt 
officiating. 

Miss Dineen was attended by Miss 
Margaret O'DnnneH and Mr. Howard 
had for his best man. .him 's R. 
v oun". The littU train bearer was 
Mester Wilberl Callanan. 

The bride wore a g wn of el 
beaded with silver, over white 
with a veil of tulle, caught 
orange blossoms, and carried a 
er bouquet of white rose-, and 
of the valley. Miss O'Donnell 
silver metal cloth, trimmed 
rol in's ee-jr blue tulle, with a match- 
inj? hat. and carried tea roses. 

Following the ceremony a recep- 
tion was held at the horn ■ of the 
bridegroom's mother where a wed- 
<iinir supper was served. Mr. Howard 
and his bride, upon their return from 
a wedding journey, are to make theT 
horn- in the Mulclair Apartments, 
Medford. 

The bride is a graduate of the Win- 
chester schools and previous to her 
marriai/e was employed nf. the Win- 
chester Division of the New England 
Laundries. Mr. Howard was edu- 
cated in the Woburn schools and in 
Michigan and is associated with C. F. 
Hovey Company in Boston. 



liflfon, 
satin, 
with 
show- 

1 i 1 ies 
wore 
with 



8 



THK WINCHESTER, MASS. STAR, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, IPSO 




SUPERIOR 

fplonwttoil Features 



| AutomatiCook to aU 
uuyx ui»<- the exact 
baking heat. 



Cxtra heavily insu- 
la te<l in make less Gas 
do more. 



H LARGE CAPACITY 
o\ I N uiih Tho Firm 
Cast Iron Racks. 

. | Si iinl> < 'iisl Iron Irys 
mukc i!k ( .li'imiioil 
firm anil rigid. 



^ Oven is scientifically 
ventilated to chimney 
flue. 



a 



^ Broiling Compart- 
m. Ml m convenient 
height, 

Kilt ire Iriinl ami cook- 
ie- input durable cust 
iron. 



to 

IB 

12 



Furnished in clean, 
rusl proof enamel in- 
miI<- ami out. < olors: 
Gray, Green and <H«l 
Ivory . 

Raised port burners 
for greater efficiency. 

Large roomv * ooking 
Top with manifold 
pipes concealed. 

f "on ven Sent l> n 1 1 o n 
stv le (ins 4 in k Han- 
dles ;iinl Push lint ton 
Lighter. 

Hand} drawerforstor- 
iny < looking I ii nsils. 



• for Greater 
Convenience, Comfort, 
Economy and Leisure 




1 X* »» 



in 



/A. 

"'•'■'/. T es "... 



Ehtuhl v insula f<><l 

The walls surrounding DeLuxe Glenwood 
Ovens are carefully /iond packed with mineral 
wool. This "custom-built" method retains 
the heat better than the method used in 
insulating ordinary ranges. 



'"if. '''« Js 



Ai§li\<pTo\ Gas Light Company 



r 



Tel. 



Ol 82 




MISS A VERY GIVES HER 
LECTURE 



THIRD 



VIRGINIA WARREN IN SUM, 
RECITAL 



WINCHESTER HOSPITAL DIKTI- 
TIC LABORATORY 



i 



On Nov Miss Avery gave her 
third Current Events' lecture of the 
season, speaking on her recent visit 
tn Russia and the impressions ga'ncd 
while there. Of course no one can 
i.iaw any definite conclusions abaut 
Russia's" future fnun a short visit and 
as there haw been many honks writ- 
ton about modern Russia and its 
problems. Miss Aver j said she would 
confine her*j'f to the personal ion- 
tacts she had with the country and 
its people. 

Russia covers an immense territory 
and much of it is little known. It has 
enormous potential wealth with the 
greatcsf standing lumber supply in 
too world and the second largest oil 
output. Tho population numbers over 

I ',i ,000 and consists of over 200 

races. The Russian people have a 
great capacity Cor endurance and 
great dramatic instinct. Though 
Russia and the United States are ab- 
solutely disimilar in their methods, 
yet both are working toward the 
same end. 

Miss Avery said that she realized 
when she went into Russia that what 
she learned while there would not be 
from what she heard but front what 
she saw. She had heard tales of 
tourists not getting enough to eat 
but she herself had plenty, doubtless 
more than the average Russian, and 
one thing was cheap for everyone, 
and that was entertainment. 

It was not physically difficult to 
travel about Russia, Miss Avery said, 
but it was a great emotional strain 
with the contrast between what was 
and what is. between the fall of the 
old regime and the rise of the new on 
the ashes of the past. Russia today is 
allowing every race to speak its own 
language and is teaching every per- 
son to read and write, and this is a 
long step from the days of the Czars. 
Today Russia is attempting the most 
dramatic experiment the world has 
ever seen and we arc fortunate in 
having the privilege of watching it 
develop. 

On Pec. 10, Miss Avery will speak 
on "Germany." 



song recital to be 
Warren on Wed- 
Dec. in in .Ionian 
ittracting wide- 



The forthcoming 
given by Virginia 
nesday evening, 
Hall, ' Boston, i 

spread interest among music lovers. 

Since her return to America a year 
ago, she has filled concert engage- 
mi tits m many of our large cities and 
has assisted musical organizations in 
orchestral numbers and in oratorio 
roles. Nothing has served to spread 
the fame of the young artist, who 
makes her home in Winchester with 
her parents, than her selection as so- 
loist at the Tercentenary dinner given 
at the Copley Plaza Hotel in Boston 
last September by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts in honor of the dis- 
tinguished guests of the Common- 
wealth, among whom were the British 
Ambassador to the United States 
and representatives of nearly all for- 
eign governments, as well as dis- 
tinguished personages from all over j 
our own country. 

Miss Warren has a soprano voice | 
of remarkable quality and exquisite 
purity and warmth and as Warren 
Stony Smith, music critic of the Bos- 
ton Post said of her after a recent 
ci ncert, she is "a horn recital singer" 



EPISCOPAL MEN'S CLUB 



A Progressive Step in Education 



"As a combined Science p.:id Dietit- 
ic Laboratory is most unsatisfactory 
steps are being taken to provide a 
separate Dietetic Laboratory, When 
this is completed it is strongly urged 
that arrangements for improving the 
Science Laboratory go forward so 
that there may be a complete and 
modern teaching unit." 

The above represents an excerpt 
from the last inspector's report of 
the School of Nursing by the New 
York Department of Education, The 
first part of our answer may he seen 
in the splendidly equipped dietetic 
laboratory given to the hospital by 



I the Winton ( -lub, 
is felt by pupils 
j unit and it is an 
I to the progre 
: in educat ion 
ly shown by 
ter. 

The great 
strated towai 
diseasi 
by the 



The greatest prid< 
md staff in this new 
enduring monument 
ssive policy and interest 
that is being constant- 
the people of Winches- 



interest being demon- 
I the treatment of many 
i by diet is hardly appreciated 
great majority of people, but 



WINCHESTER MAN NEW 
OFFICIAL 



TAX 



Sunday night 
ported to Patrt 
bury that there 
at the corner 
Church streets, 



at 1 1 :35 a man re- 
lman Clarence Dun- 
had been an accident 
of Cambridge and 
Patrolman 1 lunburv 



Mr. Francis 0. P. Carlson of Wedge 
Pond road, assistant secretary to 
Governor Frank (i. Allen, has been 
appointed by Tax Commissioner Long 
to the position of deputy tax com- 
missioner at a salary of $4350 a year. 
Mr. Carlson has had several years ex- 
perience in State affairs, having 
served as assistant secretary to Gov- 
ernor Alvan T. Fuller before accept- 
ing a similar position with Governor 
Allen. He is a World War veteran, 
a member of Winchester Post. 07, A. 
L„ and has many friends in Win- 
chester who will be pleased to learn 
of his good fortune. 



WINCHESTER PUBLIC LIBRARY 



went to the place designated and 
found that an automobile had gone 
over the sidewalk and had smashed 
about 10 feet of hedge at the resi- 
dence of Mr. Edwin Jennings at l'JT 
Church street. The operator of the 
car had left before the arrival of the 
police, and the registration of the car 
had not been taken. 



Then- will be an exhibition of 
photographs loaned by the Library 
Art Club from Dec 1-20 on "The Is- 
land of Mount Desert, Me. 

"This same day. (September, 
1604), we passed quite mar an is- 
land which is some, four or five 
leagues long. The island is very 
high, and so cleft in places that it 
appears as if seven or eight moun- 
tains were ranged side by side. I 
have named this island 'L'isle des 
Monts Desert.'" — (Note book of 
Samuel de Champlain. 



"Diet in Relation to Health" is one 
of the most constructive slogans we 
use. To teach this invaluable les- 
son requires equipment and a well 
prepared teacher. We now possess 
both and our Dietothoraphy Course 
proves one of the most interesting in 
the curriculum. 

This new laboratory consists of 
two monel metal covered tables with 
accommodation for eight pupils --each 
student having complete individual ' 
equipment. Blackboard, dish and 
utensil cabinet, electric ice chest were 
parts of this most complete trift that 
also included painting of the room 
and laying of attractive linoleum in 
grey and white. We trust many in- 
terested friends, who have not seen 
this addition, will make it a point of 
visiting the Nurses' Home and view- 
progress that is being made 
nursing education, thanks 
devoted and understanding \ 



Epiphany Men's Club will hold the 
second of their series of winter meet- 
ings next Wednesday evening. Dee. 
10 in the parish house, Church and 
Norwood streets. Ladies of the 
Church Service League under the di- 
rection of Mrs. George Leghorn and 
Mrs. L. E. Snow will serve dinner at 
6:30 p. m., following which there 
will be opportunity for new members 
i f the parish to become acquainted 
and a short business meeting. 

At 7:4. r i p. m.. R. 1-'. Stevens of 
Arthur D, Little, Inc., well known 
chemical and industrial engineers, 
will speak on the subject, "Molding 
the Future." Mr. Stevens, a gradu- 
ate of M. I. T., has had excellent op- 
portunity to inform himself on the 
subject of research as applied to our 
every day life, having just returned 
from an extensive tour of the coun- 
try's hading research institutions 
with a group of engineers, who were 
sent out by the National Research 
Council and under the auspices of 
the New England Council of business 
men. 

Visits were made to laboratories 
of the General Electric Companies, 
Bell Telephone Company, General 
Motors and several steel corporations. 
Mr. Stevens has the faculty of mak- 
ing industrial research vital and in- 
teresting to the layman and will re- 
late some of the current industrial 
developments which bid fair to revo- 
lutionize our present mode of living. 

President Alton B. Jackson and his 
executive committee promise a most 
interesting evening. 




MYSTIC VALLEY LEAGUE 



Calumet continues to hold its lead 
in the Mystic Valley League, and on 
Monday night took 13 of the 15 
points represented in its match with 
the Medford Club. The local teams 
won every point except one in bowl- 
ing and one in billiards. McGrath 
was the shining light on the alleys, 
rolling a single string of 162 and a 
total of 364. Goldsmith, Blanchard 
and "Newt" Purington also rolled 
well, together with Brown of Med- 
ford, who got 117 and .'122. 

The scores: 

( alumrt vi Mrilforil 

CALUMET Hi 

Goldsmith UM 103 112 819 

N. Purlnttton 10" II" <•:) 310 

It. Purrington 98 Kit kt 2X7 

McGrath 85 117 162 864 

HitWlflH lot !'l 92 290 



of the dinner bridge to be held ;it the 
Calumet Club next Friday, Dec. 12. 
The dinner will open at 6:30 sharp. 

The Calumet Club will visit the 
Kernwood dub at Maiden in the 
Mystic Valley League next Monday 
evening. As this is always a popular 
meeting between the two clubs, it is 
expected that ,-i large aggregation 
from the local club will attend. 

A bowling party for the ladies will 
be hi !'l at the ( lalumel Club next. 
Tuesday afternoon, Bowling will 
.-tart at 2:30. 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



493 -'i:'.! 
MEDFORD 1 1 1 



Corbin . . 
(5. Lewi* 
Smith . . . 
Hartwell 
Mackin .. 



!'l 

91 

89 

W 
M 



4113 

CALUMET 

BlancharH 95 

I'ilkington 1"« 

Priest BIS 

Hnlhronk 93 

Hlldreth 106 



SOPHOMORES WON HOCKEY 
CHAMPIONSHIP AT IIK.II 
SCHOOL 



intr the 
in our 
to our 
friends. 



REDS 



WON FRESHMAN 
CHAMPIONSHIP 



CLASS 



T. F. Kennefick 

Roofing and Metal Work 
off All Kinds 

Office at A. Miles Holbrook's 
24 CHURCH STREET TEL WIN. 1250 



The Red and White teams of the 
Freshman Class held their final play 
off for the championship of the class 
Wednesday afternoon. The Keds won 
"> — 1 but it was a much harder fought 
than the score would indicate. 
Rradlee and June PettingeM 
caged one point for their team 
K. Sharon added three more 
to the score. For the White 1 
L. Elliott scored the only 



Tuesday the Sophomores of the 
Winchester High School won their 
1033 numerals by defeating the 
Seniors in a class hockey game 2 — 1. 
The Sophomores defeated both the 
Junior and Senior teams, while the 
latter two teams tied when playing 
against each other, giving the Soph- 
omores the championship, 4 — 1. Many 
of the e:irls on all the teams showed 
promise of developing into some fine 
varsity players. 

The line up follows: 
SOPHOMORES K. Sanford, 
I. aniline. V. Armstrong, J. 
Browne. N. Young, D. Noble, 
Hathaway, M. Mountain, J. W 
SENIORS J. Sanford, M. I 
berth, E. Irwin. M. Penta, D, 
lalie Mill M Hathaway, H. 



Wood . . 

Mathews 

Itrown 

(intTney 

Davis 



4*7 

MEDFOKI) I 

81 

93 

99 

I".i 

100 



90 
hH 

92 
91 
109 

470 
21 
109 
98 
H4 
98 
S7 

47H 

! i 

84 
90 
106 
106 
9<5 



546 

HH 
]II2 
S9 
H7 
92 

458 

118 
•12 
96 
97 

ion 

49H 

94 
s:t 

117 

85 
hf, 



1570 

269 
281 
270 
271 
297 

1391 

317 
29X 

266 

2SH 
293 

1461 

2.19 
2fifi 
322 
290 

281 



earn 
Jam 
each 
while 
points 
team, 
points. 
The 
REDS 
Watt 



J. Anrillo, M. 
lienenato, R, 
M. Thwintr. R. 
rfford. 

(ice, V. Trem- 
SnodgraftB, Na- 
Miley, W. Mc- 
Parttie, K. Chamberlln, R. Kpivwi. 

Umpire, Miss Centervall. Scorer, I.. Carle- 
ten. Tim.-r. ('. Merrer. (iraU made by Smxl- 
v.-ra.<s. Aneello, Benenato. 



MISSION UNION 



summary follows: 



H. (' 



('apt., rw 



fU-tf 



M 

(1, 
M. 

E. 

H. 

M 

V 

M 



Sharon, 

Sawyer. 

1 ampee, 
Bradlee, 



•f 
cf 
li 



WHITES 

rw. E. Gilbert 1 

rw. L. Williams j 
ri. S. Hatch ' 

cf, E. Chamberlin 



Hie Mis 
Congregati 
the Parish 
from 10 to 
lately 
t i mi 



ion Uni» n of the First 
nal Church will meet in 
House, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 
4. Miss Carolyn Smiley, 
returned from a tour of visits 
iions around the world will be 



472 4«2 4f,» 141* 
Calumet Medford 
Straight Pool 

Iluttirs 7". Pcrrin 37 

Cowboy Pool 

Haydcn 201 Lawler 1*1 

14-1 Halklinr Milliards 

Chamberlain 0 Harvej l 

Three ( unhion Milliards 
Reynolds 30 Trainer * 

( ards 

Harry. Handled Kelley ami Pitman won 13 
ami lust 2 at cards fur Calumet 

Calumet's standing at the top of 
list is as follows: 

Won Lost 

Howling 26 7 

Pool 5 3 

Billiards :i 5 

Cards 5 7 

Total Peints 3S 22 

Ralph Purrinjrton holds both the 
li i f-rh sinjrle and hiirh total record in 
bowling with 151 and 352, but his 
marks have now been bettered by 
McGrath, and Priest stands second in 
average with a 106 tie with Mackin of 
Medford. Butters is third in the in- 
dividual pool standing 

Mrs. Kinirman P. Cass is in charge 



Winchester has been complimented 
upon its endeavors in the recently 
completed rat campaign conducted 
under the auspices of the County Kx- 
tension Service. Twenty-three hun- 
dred packages of bait (poison) were 
distributed here, and mosl of it put 
to good use. 

Considerable damage was done by 
the bursting of water pipes in an un- 
occupied house ,-it 102 Sylvester ave- 
nue last Sunday. The trouble was 
discovered by Motorcycle Officer Ho- 
gan of the Police Department who is 
recovering from a long illness at his 
j home on Sylvester avenue. The Water 
Department was notified and trouble 
man "Hill" Nowell was soon at the 
scene of the break. It was necessary 
to shut off the water outside the 
dwelling as access to the house could 
not be gained without breaking a 
door or window. The house is owned 
by a Medford lumber concern. 

While crossing Westley stmet last 
Friday, Alva W. Cross of 320 Wash- 
ington street slipped and fell, sus- 
tained injuries which were treated by 
Dr. Milton J. Quinn. Mr. Cross also 
went to the Winchester Hospital for 
X-rav examination. The matter was 
reported to the police. 

The police were notified last Fri- 
day evening that some time during 
the nie-ht previous, the home of John 
W. Wattrs at l!i Wildwood street 
had been entered. Access was pained 
through a window. The silver had all 
been examined by whoever entered 
the dwelling, but nothing was re- 
ported as missine-. Sergt. Thomas F. 
Cassidy of the Police Department be- 
gan an investigation at once. 
^ An Essex sedan, driven by Clifton 
E. Hall of 27 Vernon street. Woburn, 
and a Chevrolet sedan, operated by 
Daniel F. Houirhtori of 11 Gilman 
terrace, Sornerville. were in collision 
at the junction of Washington street 
and the Parkway last Sunday night 
at 11:50. The Essex was goinn- north 
on Washington street and the Chev- 
rolet was headed west on the Park- 
way. Both cars were damaged, but 
no one was injured. 



P. ttinfrell, 
Hatrfcerty, 



rh 



Backers rh 
Cerhy. lh . 



Sharon, rh 
Cooper, rh 
Kennerson, 
I amiw, k 
Sawyer, g 



li. E. Loftus 

li. 1.. Elliott 

Iw. V. Itul] 

lw. M Hmphrey 

rh. B Skene 

ch, M. Johnson 

. lh. D. R.'M en 

lh. ¥ Lnftus 
rh. M Shauchnesspy 



lh, 
t*i I 
• K, 



M Dutch 
. Williams 
E. Gilbert 



the speaker. Those wishing to brim: 
I guests for luncheon are asked to noti- 
fy Mrs. Ben Schneider before Mon- 
I day evening, Winchester 1 723 or Mrs. 
J. Churchill Hindes 0G41-J. 

Mrs. Remington Plumer of Wild- 
wood street is enjoyinir a trip to the 
West Coast, visiting friends in Mil- 
waukee. Cleveland and New Orleans, 
turuute. 



Money to Loan 1 St* 



On one and two-family houses preferred. Owner 
and occupant preferred. Applications now being 
taken for leans— not over $8000 to one borrower. 
Money advanced to build. Call personally with 
Deed. 



AT 



6% 



MERCHANT S Co operative Bank 

24 School Street, Boston, Mass. 

Assets over $30,000,000 



o2t-l.lt 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1930 



John J. Murphy, Dealer in Junk of 
AH Kinds. Highest price* paid. If 
you have anything in this line, tele- 
phone either Winchester 0924. U824-W 
or drop a postal to 28 Church street. 

mh'J-tf 



m 



A Cambridge limitation 



University 
Theatre 

Harvtrd Square. Csmbrid.'e. Masi. 



■ NOTICE OF LOST PASS DOOK 

i In comiilisnce with the r«juir«ncr>U of 
Chapter 167, Station 20, of the General Laws 
nriJ Acts in amendment thereof or lOppM- 
m.-ntary thereto, notice is hereby (riven of the 
loss of Pais Book No. 15,*" 1. iiwued by the 
Winchester Havinns Bank, and that written 
application has been made to paid bank for 
the payment of the amount of ihe deixmit 
represented by said book or for the issuance 
of duplicate book therefor. 

WINCHESTER SAVINGS BANK. 

By William t. I'nest. Treasurer 
n21-8t 



Spencer Corsets, Tiome appoint- | Everything' for your Christmas REFORESTATION OF THE WA 



ments. 
0406-k. 



Jean MacLellan. 



Tei. Win. packages, wrappings, twine, seals, 
ap27-tf tags, etc., at the Star Office. 



WINCHESTER NATIONAL BANK 




In compliance with the requirements of 
Chapter D»0, Section 40, Acts of 1908, as 
amended by Chapter 4'Jl. Section 6. Acts of 
1»09, ami by Chapter 171. Section 1. Acts of 
1812, notice is hereby g-iven of the loss of 
pass-book No. leSi. 

K. M. NELSON, t ashler 

t)28-3t 



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that thr sub- 
scriber* have been duly appointed executors of 
the will of Alice Helen Pratt late of Winches- 
ter in the County of Middlesex, Mass. deceased, 
testate, and ha*e taken upon themselves that 
trust by living bond, as the law directs. 

All persona having- demands ui>on the es- 
tut.- of said decea '«1 are hereby required to 
exhibit the same: and all persons indebted to 
sum estate are called upon to make payment 

ELMER I) FLETCHER 
( HAS. H. PRATT 

Executors 



l Address I 
20 (,<■>, rife St.. 
8 Lagrange St 

November 8, 



Somerville, Mass. 

Winchester Ma.-.-. 
1980 



nl l-3t 



STONEHAM 



Mat. 2:1". 



E 



7:4: 



Sat. 6:1.">, H::t0 



Sun. 3 IV M. 



Friday, 1 >ec. 6 
John McCormack and Maureen O'Sullivan in 
"SONG 0' MY HEAR i " 
Louise Dresser, Addie McPhail and Joyce Compton in 
"THREE SISTERS" 

AUDIO REVIEW Linenwaxe Friday 

Saturday, Doc. 'i 
Irene Rich, H. B. Warner and Raymond Hackett in 
"ON YOUR BACK" 
Dorothy Revier and Matt Moore in "CALL OF THE WEST" 

FABLES 



Sunday and Monday, Dec. 7, 8 
Gloria Swanson in "THE TRESPASSER" 

COMEDY NEWS Beautyware Monday 

Tuesday and Wednesday, Dec, 9, 10 
The Marx Brothers in "ANIMAL CRACKERS" 

COMEDY Special Matinee Tuesday at :1:20 NEWS 

Thursday and Friday, Dec. 1!, 12 
Dorothy Revier, Raymond Hatton, Margaret Livingston in 

"MURDER ON THE ROOF" 
Winifred Westover, Ben Lyon and William Collier, Jr. in 

"LUMMOX" 



14.511 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LAND COURT 
To the Hay State Mortgage Corporation and 
The Prudential Life Insurance Company, duly 
existing corporations having usual places of 
business in Boston, in the County of SutTolk 
and said Commonwealth ; Forrest N. Adams, 
Thomas B Cotter and Augustus C. Jordan, 
of said Boston . Marion H. Young. Isaac K. 
Sexton. Nellie K Sexton, Roger Billings, and 
Dorothy Billings, of Winchester, fcdwin K. 
Blaikie. William E. Blaikie. Mary S. Blaikie, 
Eleanor H. Blaikie. Emily P. Wilkins. Robert 
C. Blaikie, E. Marie Blaikie. and Violet S. 
Blaikie, of Wakefield, in the County of Mid- 
dlesex and said Commonwealth . Robert C. 
i Blaikie, of Worcester, in the County of Wor- 

• cester and said Commonwealth I and to all 

• whom it may concern : 

U Whereas, a petition has been presented to 

j said Court by Rachel S. Woodard, of Arling- 
I ton, in said County of Middlesex, to register 

and confirm her title in the following described 

land : 

A certain parcel of land with the buildings 
thereon, situate in said Winchester, bounded 
1 and described as follows: 
i Latterly by Vale Street, 78.00 feet; Souther- 

I ly by land now or formerly of L>aac K. Sexton 
et al, 139.00 feet; Westerly by land now or 
1 formerly of Marion H. Young, 76.00 feet; and 
! Northerly by land now or formerly of Roger 

hillings et al, 189.00 feet. 
| Petitioner admits that the above described 
] land is subject to certain restrictions and 
agreements as set forth in a di*ed from Herbert 
. Nash et al to Eliza A. Martin, dated May 27, 
I 190B, duly recorded Hook .1145. l'age 111. 
, The above described land is shown on a 
■ plan filed with said petition and all boundary 
' lines art- claimed to located on the ground 
I as shown on Haiti plan. 

If you desire to make any objection or de- 
fense to said lietition you or your attorney 
must file it written appearance and an an- 
.-ut i under oath, setting forth clearly and 
specifically your obi -elions or defense to each 
pint of said petition, ill the office of the Re- 
corder of said Court in Boston tat the Court 
House I, on or before the twenty-second day of 
' December next. 

Col.s.- an appearance is so filed by or for 
you. your default will be recorded, the said 
petition will be taken as confessed and you 
will be forever barred from contesting said 
oetiticr. or any decree entered thereon. 

Witness, CHARLES THORNTON DAVIS, 
Esquire, First Judge- of said Court, this twen- 
ty -tir-t day of November in the year nineteen ] 
hundred and Unity. 

Ait. t w ith Seal of said Court, 
i Seal i 

CHARLES A. SOUTHWORTH, 

Recorder 
n2lf.8t 



TEKSHEDS OF WINCHES- 
TER'S WATER SUPPLY 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. PROBATE COURT ~ t , ... - 

To the heirs-at-lsw, next of kin and all lo the Editor of the Mar: 
other persons interested in the estate id Our town of Winchester is one of 
Alexander Macdonai i 1st, .f Winchester m I the favored municipalities in having 
!-aid County, deceased. ; u i l. i , * 

WHEREAS, a certain instrument purport " ad sucn an adequate supply of water 
ing to be the last will aim lcot-.ni nt ... said i during the dry seas. in just past. In 
accessed has bexi, p. is nteu to said Court, | order that we 'may insure ourselves of 
for probate, by llara Macuonslj N-ittuig *»n.> , i ... i r . .u r i 

prays that utte : > t sum. ntao may be i»- an increased supply of water, the fol 



sued to her. the 
I without giving a 
' You are her. b> 
j bate I <>urt to be 



executrix lil.rcti 
lurety on h.r oftic 
cud to apt>ear a 
h. id at Canibi idge, 



mum d. 

li b.uid. 
a I'co- 
in sjiul 



County of Middlesex, on the twenty-second 
.lay of December A. !> 193.1, at ten o'clock 
in the forenoon, to show caus.. It any you 
have, why the same should not be granted. 

And said petitioner is hereby directed to 
give public uot.ee tlo roof, by publishing this 
citation once in each week, for three succes- 
sive \- c. k>, in The Winchester star a news 
paper pul 
iication t( 

Court, and by mailing, postpaid, m u. Ii 
ing a copy of this citation to a. I known per- 
sona interested in the estate, seven u»y« u( 

bast before .-.aid Court. 

Witness, JOHN C. L EGG AT, Esquire, First 
I Judge of said Court, this twenty-eighth day 
of November in the year one thousand nine 
hundred ami thirty. 

LORlNG I". JORDAN. Register 
Clarence A. Warren, 
Counsel for Petitioner, 

11 Beacon Sir.- t Boston dS-at 



lowing statement is to show what 
science has proven that we can and 
ought to do regarding tree life upon 
our watersheds. 

We are greatly indebted to our three 
original water commisisoners: Messrs. 
David N. SkiUing, James F. Dwinell 
and .Muses A. derrick, for this living 
and growing monument of health, he- 
ihed In Winchester th"' ia'-t "pui'» | cause of their foresightedness, persis- 
"J?. "..'.'*:, '!" y at . Iett ? \ betor , e , said ' tency of effort and grim determination 

for which they suffered much abuse. 
We arc just beginning to appreciate 
and realize their anticipated bless- 
ings. 

It w;ts stated when this system was 
constructed that it would supply our 
town with water when she should have 
16,000 inhabitants ami as we have 1J.- 
000 people in our town at present and 
are growing rapidly, what about our 
future needs of water for domestic 



COMMONWEALTH OF M ASSAI HI SETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. PROBATE COURT 

To all persons interested in the estate of I Use. 



in said County. 
Department of 



MEDFORD THEATER 

.Mat. 2 00 Eve. 7:00 

( all Mystic 1800 For Reserve Seats 



Four Days, Starting Sunday, Dec. 7— Sunday Continuous .". to 11 

Monte Carlo 

Starring JEANNETTE MacDONALD and JACK BUCKMAN 

Roman, amusing dialogue, charming; and witty 

GILBERT ROLAND in 

Men of the North 

Action and thrills aplenty 
LULA McCONNELL in "RED, GREEN AND YELLOW" 

Thursday, Friday and Saturday 

CHARLES "BUDDY" ROGERS and HELEN KANE in 

Heads Up 

Nautical, comical time aboard ship 

Those Three French Girls 

Starring FIFI D0RSAY 

They'll teach you about love and laughs in any language 



Now Playing 

"MADAM SATAN" and "THE SANTA FE TRAIL" 



CAPITOL 

ARLINGTON 
Massachusetts Avenue at Lake Street 



Now Playing 
Ouster Kealon in 
"DOUGH BOYS" 

and 

John McCormack in 
"Som; '<> MV HEART" 



lu 



Mon, Tuca. Wed., Dee. i 
GEORGE AMISS in 

"OLD ENGLISH" 

Conrad Naff el in 
"NUMBERED MEN" 
Bargain .Matinee Every Wednesday 
All Seats 15c 

Thurs. Fri. Sat , Die. 11, U. 13 
CONSTANCE BENNETT in 

"3 FACES EAST" 

Charles Ruga-lea and (;in«er Rogers in 

"QUEEN ll It. ii 
(aft N'iffht Every Saturday Evening 
20 Gifts to 20 Lurky i'atrnns 

Coming Dee. !:.. 16, Ii, "Eddie" Can- 
tor in "Whoopee;" Dec. 18, 19, Jo. 
Ramon Novarro in "tall of the Flesh;" 

"The Spoilers;" "Life of Ihe Party;" 
"Laughter;** "Playbo) of Paris;" and 

many others. Watch and wait for 
them ! 



Anne Dodd of Winchester 
and to the Massachusetts 
Mental Diseases. 

WHEREAS, Curtis W. Nash conservator of 
the property of said Anne Dodd has presented 
for allowance, his fust account as such con- 
servator, 

You are hereby cited to appear at a Pro- 
bate Court, tn be held at Cambridge in said 
County, on tin- twenty-second day of De- 
cember A. I). 1030, at ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon, to show cause, if any you have, why 
the same should not be allowed. 

And saiil conservator is ordered to serve 
this citation by delivering a copy thereof to 
all persons interested in the estate fourteen 
days at least before said Court, or by pub- 
lishing the same once in each week, for three 
successive weeks, in The Winch, sler Star a 
newspaper published in Winchester the last 
publication to he one day at least ln-fore said 
Court, and by mailing, post-paid, a copy of 
this citation to all known persons interested 
in the estate seven days at least before said 
Court, and by delivering a copy of this ci- 
tation to the Massachusetts Department of 
Mvnt.il Diseases seven days at least before 
-aid Court. 

Witness, JOHN C. LEG GAT, Esquire, Flint 
Judge "1 said Court, this twenty-fourth day 
of November in the year of our Lord one 
thousand nine hundred and thirty. 

LORlNG r. JORDAN, Register 

d5-3t 



Science is answering the question in 
a most practical way under the head 
of conservation. The average rain- 
fall of about 42 inches in depth can 
l>e greatly conserved by the substitu- 
tion of the evergreen trees in place 
i if the hardwood trees. 

Professor Ralph J. Hosmcr of Cor- 
nell University states that all hard- 
wood trees that begin life as a stump 
or sprout growth are always false or 
hollow hearted, and do not live to any 
great age. A large percentage of the 
hardwood trees located upon our wa- 
ter sheds arc of that nature anil are 
over mature. 

The consumption of water by the 
hardwood trees is very much in excess 
of that by the evergreen trees. 

Dr. Gale of the Groton Water Sys- 
tem that supplies the city of New 
York with water fur domestic use. has 
stated that in his opinion a well de- 
veloped evergreen forest will consume 
no more water to sustain life than 
would require to grow a crop of bay 
on the same sized lot of land. This 
statement of Dr. t 'ale's with his great 
experience ill forestry work, is of 
great value under the head of conser- 
vation of the rainfall. 

The undergrowth under the hard- 
wood trees is always at a maximum, 
whereas under an evergreen shade 
there is a minimum of undergrowth 
which means a great saving of water 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. PROBATE COURT 

To the heirs-at-law, next of kin and all 
other persons interested in the estate of 
Freeman Nickernon late of Winchester in said 
County, deceased. 

WHEREAS, a certain instrument purport- 
ing to he the last will and testament of said 
deceased has been presented to said Court, for 
probate, by Gcorginna Nickerson who prays 
thai Ii iters t. -tani. ntary may be issued to 
her. the executrix therein named, without giv- 
ing a surety on her official bund. 

You are hereby cited to appear at a Fro- 1 on this 405 acres of our water sheds 
bate 

County of Middlesex, on the ninth day of De 
ri-mbvr A. 1). 1030, at ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon, to show cause, if any you have, why 
i la- -.one should not hi- granted. 

And -aid petitioner is hereby directed to give 
put. la- notice thereof, by publishing this ci- 
taliol ee ill each week, for three succes- 
sive weeks, in The Winchester Star a news- 
papi r pubiished in Winchester the Inst pub- 
lication to be one day. at least, before said 
Court, and l.y mailing, post-paid, or deliver- 

I ing a copy of this citation to all known per- 
son, interested in the estate, seven days at 
least before said Court. 

; Witness, JOHN C. LEGGAT, Esquire, First 
Judge of said Court, this thirteenth day of 
November in the year one thousand nine hun- 
dred and thirty. 

LORlNG 1'. JORDAN, Register 
n2l-3t 



E. M. LOEWS 



Regent 



ARLINGTON 
MEDFORD ST. TEL. 



1197 



Matinees at 2 — Evenings at 7:30 
Saturdays ami Holidays Continuous 
1:311 to 10:30 

Friday and Saturday. Die. 5, 6 

TOM MOORE and 
BLANCHE SWEET in 

"The Woman Racket" 

HI CK JONES in 

"Shadow Ranch" 

SATURDAY NITE VODVIl. 
Monday, Tuesday, Dec. 8, ;* 
BASIL RATH BONE in 
"This Mad World" 

ALICE DA V in 
"Ladies in Love" 

SATI KDAY KIDDIES' MATINEE 

Wednesday, Thursday. Dec. 10. 11 

DICK BARTHELM ESS in 
"The Dawn Patrol" 

ALICE WHITE in 

"Sweethearts on Parade" 



.mi t.. he h.id nt Cambridge in -aid i of town owned land. 

The water consumed to sustain the 
life of this undergrowth equals sev- 
eral millions of gallons of water per 
year, which can be conserved under a 
canopy of evergreen trees. 

Mr." F. F. Kane, former State For- 
ester, has made the statement in com 
paring the consumption of water by 
the hard wood trees versus the ever- 
green trees, as follows: for every 
pound of leaf material that falls from 
Ihe hardwood trees in the fall of the 
year, 170 pounds of water is required 
to produce the same, whereas 43 
pounds of water are required to grow 
one pound of the foliage of the ever- 
green trees, or in other words. 56 
gallons of water is required to grow 
one pound of leaf material of the 
hardwood trees as compared with five 
gallons needed to develop one pound 
of the evergreen foliage. 

It is safe to state that there is an 
average of 250 hardwood trees per 
acre on this water shed or was when 
this reforestation was first instituted 
which, when multiplied by the number 
of acres, estimating that there an 
It) pounds of leaves per tree, the re- 
sults of water consumed by the hard- 
wood trees is astounding. We cannot 
afford to waste so much water. 

I>r. Frank Thone, a noted scientist 
in forestry work at Washington, l> 
C., has stated that a well developed 
hardwood tree will transpire one bar- 
rel of water per day during the grow 



Monday, Tuesday Evenings 

LINENWARE NIGHTS 

Wednesday Night • 

DRESSERWARE NIGHT 



l'y virtue and in execution of the power of 

sale contained in a certain mortgage deed 

given by Charles Bruce to James Otis Simonds 

dated March 21. I'.cj'.i, being Document No. 

Mti.. >.">., registered April in, 1929, and noted 

on Certificate of Title No. 6523 in Registra- 
tion Book II, l'age 337, in the Middlesex 

South Ifogi-try District, for breach of the 

conditions contained in said mortgage and 

lor the purpose of foreclosing the same, will 
j l.e Hold al public auction on the premises 

hereinafter described on Monday the fifteenth 

day of December, A. D. 11)30, at four o'clock 
j in the afternoon, all and singular the prem- 
j i>»^ in said mortgage described as follows, 
I to wit: A certain parcel of laud in Winches- 
j ter, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, shown 
' as Lot numbered 119 on plan entitled "Wood- 
side, Winchester, Mass., subdivision of I^its 
to 43 Land Court Case 5512, Farkcr Hol- 

brook, Engineer, dated April :io, 1927, filed 

with the Land Registration Office* a copy of 

which i> tiled with the South Registry District 

lor Middlesex County, bounded and described 

as follows, viz: Southwesterly, Westerly and 

Northerly by Woodaide Road and Wickford 

Road l.y four measurements Nineteen and 

.1 ion (19.61J feet. Eighty-two and 51/100 

naif™, w' °i'"r B .* •"J W/12? ing season. Transpiration is the func 

lltlb.29) feet and Fourteen and 49/100 (14,49) 
| feet respectively: Easterly by the Lot No. 
I One Hundred i loin as shown on said plan 

One hundred one illlll feet! Southerly by 
| the Lot No. 75 as shown on said plan One 

hundred fourteen and 40/100 (114.411) feet, 
I and containing 12,240 square feet subject to 

Ihe zoning law requirements of the Town of 
i Winchester, 

Said premises will be sold subject to all 
' unpaid taxes and municipal liens if any there 
j be. $300 will he required to la- paid by the 
! purchaser at the time and place of sale; other 
' terms nt sale. 

i l or further particulars apply to Dallinifer 
I & St. arns. attorneys. X'J State St., Boston. 

I Mass. 

JAMES OTIS SIMONDS, Mortgagee 

n21-3t 



tion in tree life of gathering water h> 
(ho small white rootlets in the ground 
and passing it through the roots and 
up the trunk of the tree through the 
limbs and to the very tips of all of 
the leaves on the tree. 

A well developed hardwood tree is 
said to possess from 185.000 to 250,000 
leaves as a canopy cover. The leaves 
of a tree are its lungs, through which 
it breathes-, and the amount of wa 
ter that passes off in evaporation is 
'arge, as stated above. Every tree has 
ts own chemical laboratory, and the 



ReadingTheater 

DEDICATED TO SUPER ENTERTAINMENT 



TEL. MAI DEN 0212 

Starts Saturday. Dec S 

EL BRENDEL and 
JOHN W AYNE in 

"THE BIG TRAIL" 




(D yMIDDLE/EX COUNT 

CENTER*^" 



Second Feature 

"HOLIDAY" 

with ANN HARDING 

Knds Friday. Dec. 5 

"PLAYBOY OF PARIS" 

and 

"HER MAN" 



1 \ AUDITORIUM 

\ . INDOOR GOLF COUrVTE 




A Shiver-a-Second: 



Friday and Saturday 



"THE SEA GOD" 

RICHARD ARLEN, FAY WRAY 
and 

If It's Action You Crave — Here It Is! 

"MEN OF THE NORTH" 

GILBERT ROLAND, BARBARA LEONARD 



A Thrill a Second 



Monday and Tuesday 
\\ hat a time you're going to have when you see this tireat lau«h 

jamboree with 
EDDIE CANTOR 

"WHOOPEE" 

TWO EVENING PERFORM ANCES — 6 :30 I'. M., 8:30 P. M. 



Wednesday ami Thursday 

A fierce, poignant dra- 
ma that strips bare the 
glamor and glory of 
war! 

LOUIS W0LHEIM 
LEW AYRES 

Two Evening I'erformanr- 
68— 6:30 I*. M_ 8-.:'0 I'. M. 



! 

i 




chemicals needed to develop the tree 
are retained and sent downward white 
the water that is not needed is ™ . 

rated through the leaves ev *P<>- 
Miss Julia Ellen Hoirers ., „ ♦ i 
Mudent of nature. Lfwffin' BI K5S 
books ,n relation to her study, and 
one of her statements i n elatkm to 
t'"dwiuH trees is that a well devcU 
oped hardwood tree will consume dur- 
*" oo a r > f. rowin S season m ^ th »«» 

.8,000 gallons ot water which would 
mean an average of 183 gallons of 
water per day. which on our watershed 
means a very large consumption of 

Hon. .Martin L. Davey, Conirresa 
man f rom Ohio, made a speech fnX 

Ap 1 22 &T* S f 8t Washington, 
April 22, 1920, relating to conserva- 
tion oi American forest and water 
supplies. He stated as follows: "Mr 
Speaker and Gentlemen of the House' 
t is not my purpose today to discuss 
he question oi lumber supply at ereat 
ength. 1 want so far as the Jower 
withm me lies, to direct your att' , 
to the , ,„,. phaaefi n 

«S they relate to the effects of forest 
Ration in other equally serious 
ways, perhaps more serious 

U't .lie call y„ur attend, n to the 

£ hut scientists have estimated that 
one nvc age tree ,„ a s j nfr | e ,,„ wi 
season throws into the air though "tf 

eaves about 500 barrels of water by 

wn'Y'rr C S IIed inspiration, from 
April is, to Sept. 1st, live mo nth a 

Just as our breath is laden will, 
m -sum. when it comes from our 

ungs, so there is breathed out through 
t ic leaves of trees great quantities of 

'"id be condensed and come back 
more as rainfall. ,\nd thus we 
see a very direct relation between the 

■x stence ot trees and the ram that, 
•nav come to bless the earth 

J Tje leaf is the most important thing 
m all the realms of life, it is the one 
; "id "nly connecting link between the 
°,nranic and the inorganic worlds' 

I here are only two minerals that man 
can take into Ins system and assimi- 
late—water and salt - and these only 

n jmited quantities. Everything else 
We eat and. in fact, most of the 
things that we wear come to us 
through the leaves of vegetation— not 
of trees alone, hut of all vegetation. 

K IS the leaf which takes the dead 
mineral elements from the soil, tin- 
inorganic elements, and transforms-, 
those minerals i„t„ organic, living 
<;"!ls and makes it possible fo,- them 
to lee, the whole of the living world 
And thus it appears that the great 
t.otl who created the world and tho. 

ife 'that inhabits it ma de of t|„. lowly 

oa the greatest and the most impor- 
tant instrumentality of that life " 

The foliage of the coniferous tree--, 
as i! tails to the Ground makes a much 
better sponge-like covering on the 
ground, known as humus, and a note I 
French scientist has state,! that , t will 
contain from on., t,, f tj mea |)s 
weight of water and v itisen tie. water 
lo much mere rapidly seep into the 
ground, The dead foliage of the hard- 
wood trees is wafted hithi r au I thith- 
er by the wind and is not considered 
to be as good „ cover on a water shed 
as the evergreen foliage. 

The hardwood tret s ho. ild all be re- 
moved as rapidly as evergreen trees 
can be made available to take their 
place if we are to get the full benefit, 
of the reforestation work, Young 
pines are seriously retard ■ 1 in their 
growth where the shade is so dense 

as in many [dace- upon many water- 
.- heds. 

Dr. Harvey Wiley, a \ w York 
statesman of recent d<»l •, stated beforo 
the Legislature a< follows: "As w.- 
learn more of hygiene we understand 
better the relation between trees and 
health and the necessity of pur... clean 
air to be nl taine I f om the forest. Wo 
enn live less than five weeks without 
food, less than five days without wa- 
ter, and less than five minutes with- 
out air." 

All of this" necessities are practi- 
cally dependent upon trees. The trees 
are necessary to the earth ii' arc tho 
capillaries to the body. 

A noted engineer of Brookline, Mr. 
Desmond Fitzgerald, alter many year-; 
of experimenting, stated that the 
evaporation of fresh waW from a 
water surface in the vicinity of Hus- 
ton equals :'!i inches in denth per year 
out of an average rainfall of inch- 
es. This means that we must con- 
serve as much as possible of the wa- 
ter that falls upon this wator shed. 

This work was instituted in the fall 
of itoi; by first cutting away tic 
hardwood growth 100 feet in width on 
the shore lines of the Notth, Mi Idle 
and South Reservoirs. feet from 
water's edge, on the shore line 10'i 
miles. 

During the period of 13 years or 
more the leaves and the organic mat- 
ter has been fulling into the water 
of our re ervoirs and contamination 
was on the increase causing the wa- 
ter to have an unpleasant taste and 
.dor during: the summer and fall sea- 
nns, previous to the removal of the 
hardwood on the 100 foot strip. 

The three advantages to be obtained 
by this work are: First, and most mi- 
le rtant, improvement in th ■ condition 
of the water. Second, conservation. 
Third, preservation of this remarka- 
ble v.at. r shed. 

Charles E. Kendall, 
Water Commissioner 

"Land-Brid-e" Not Needed 

The existence of a so-called "land- 
bridge" between Alaska and Asia In 
ancient times is argued by some sci- 
entists as an explanation of how man 
first arrived in America from Asia. 
Doctor Hrdllckfl scouts the theory. 
A lure! bridge, he says, was wholly un- 
necessary. Primitive heats made of 
the skins of animals, such as still are 
used by some Alaskan natives, would 
have lo-on, he siiys. sufficient to cross 
the Bering sea. 



Aboriginal Europeani 

Tlo- Basques are believed to be a 
fragment, perhaps the only distinct 
remnant, of the pre-Aryan race or nii- 
ortginnl people of Europe. Their lan- 
guage is the only non-Aryan language 
of western Kurope. Recent Investlga* 
tions Indicate connections with the 
Berbers < f North Africa, who are of 
Hamitic stock. 



***** 



10 



THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5. MO 




(lur Winchester Oflica 

WEST SIDE HOME 

It i- possible, because of unusual circumstances, to purchase 
one <>f the most attractive modern homes on th.' West Side ol 
Winchester at a material sacrifice. The house contains a large liv- 
ing room a sun-room, Colonial dining room and modern kitchen 
on the It-1 floor; three well arranged chambers and two tile baths 
on the second floor, and a maid's room and storage on the third 
n„..r. There i* over 12.000 square feet of Ian, , well }^capeA 
and planted with perennial plant- and shrubs. Price $14,000, less 
than assessed value. 



Edward T. Harrington Inc. 

REALTORS 
39 CHURCH STREET WINCHESTER 1400 



VERNON W. JONES 
Suburban Real Estate 

31 CHURCH STREET 

QUAINT REPRODUCTION of a Connecticut home with at- 
tractive features throughout. Six rooms and bath, fireplace, hot 
water heat, jrarajre, fine location. Priced exceedingly low. 

RENTALS— Many attractive single homes and apartments a*. 
i 15 to $150. 

TELEPHONE WINCHESTER 0898 




ONCE A WEEK 

<\ is not too often to have Bailey's drivers 
call for a suit to be 
Brushed Clean, Sponged and Pressed 

75c 

BAILEY'S CLEANSERS & DYERS, INC. 



17 Church St. 
Winchester, Mass. 
Tel. Win. 0528 



Watcrtown. Mass. 
Tel. .Mid. 4561 




OPEN FOR YOUR INSPECTION SUNDAY 

We extend an invitation to inspect the 
beautiful home of ten rooms, three baths, and 
two-car garage located at Number 2 Dart- 
mouth Street in the exclusive Wedgemere Park. 

We believe that you will appreciate the 
unusually line construction, design, and the 
many modern conveniences this home offers. 

To reach Wedgemere Park from Church 
Street, iro north on Wedgemere Avenue into 
Wedgemere Park. 

RENTALS 

Many single homes to rent in the best locations. 
For an appointment to inspect call Mr. Puffer. 

HENRY W. SAVAGE', Irio. 

273 HARVARD STREET, COOLIDGE CORNER, BROOK LINE 
Est. 1840 REALTORS Asp. 1504 

WINCHESTER OFFICE, 557 MAIN STREET, TEL. WIN. 1980 
RES. TEL. WIN. 1160 



SPECIAL MARKDOWN 
ON DRESSES 

ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY ALL NEW STYLE DRESSES 
Formerly $16.50, now S10.50 

A SELECT LINE OF NEW AND USEFUL GIFTS FOR THE 
HOLIDAY SEASON 

Looking Around Incurs No Obligation 

~ HOSIERY • MDIRWCAR * GlfTS ~ 



Walter Charming, Inc. 

REALTORS 

EXCHANGE — SHARON FOR WINCHESTER 

Hiffh class, 8-room semi-bungalow. Fine location, beautiful 
grounds, modernized, with oil heat. Price $15,000 for attractive, 
high-grade Winchester property, 

EXCEPTIONALLY PLEASANT 

Home on a corner lot of a beautiful side hill, (dose to center, 
a well built, 8-room house, and garage. Fine view across town. 
Large living room, 2 fireplaces, furnace heat. Priced $9000 to at- 
tract quick sale. 

Tel. Winchester 0984 
Helen I. Fessenden Resident Representative 



NEWSY PARAGRAPHS 



Automobile 
Insurance 

$3 down 

LOWEST RATE OF INTEREST IN THE STATE 
BALANCE IN SMALL MONTHLY PAYMENTS 
WELL KNOWN STRONG COMPANIES 

L. W. PUFFER, *Jr. 

557 MAIN STREET WINCHESTER 
TEL. WIN. 19s0— RES. WIN. 1160 



o81-tf 



We have just installed the last word 
in a Permanent Waving Machine and 
are now prepared to give you the la- 
test and best in Permanent Waving, 
The Idotiian Beauty Shop, National 
Bank Building, tel. Win. 1408. n21-ti 

Mrs. Harold F. Meyer entertained 
the Leland Powers School Alumnae 
Club at her home Monday afternoon. 
Fifty girls from around greater Bos- 
ton were present. Mrs. Frdine Coro- 
lishaw Hannigan read "Dear Brutus" 
a most enjoyable play. The pourers 
were Mrs. Wallace Tibbetts of Win- 

j throp, Mrs. John Devine of Lexing- 
ton, Mrs. William S. Railsback of 
Newton and Mrs. Jere Shaw of Lin- 

, coin. 

t The National Associated Studios of 
Music have found it necessary to add 
another room to their number in 
; YVaterfield Hall, additional space be- 
• inn found necessary because of in- 
■ creased enrollment. 

Those in charjre of the distribution 
of Thanksgiving baskets last week 
wish to express their appreciation 
of the interest shown by Mr. Paul F, 
McCall, whi nave the use of his 

aiditm' 
provi- 



his own services, 
in delivering the 



truck and 
materially 
sions. 

Police Headquarters was notified at 
7.4"> Wednesday evening that a La- 
Salle sedan had been stolon from in 
front of the residence of Harold 1!. 
Beebe at l'7 Everett avenue. The 
theft was broadcast by the police and 
the machine was recovered in Bright- 
on by the police of Station. 14. 




ROBERT BROWNING 

"Perfect I call Thy plan: 
thanks that I was a man. 
Maker — remake — complete 
—I trust what Thou shalt 
do." 

| INTELLIGENCE shows it- 

A sell' ill a proper humility. 
A thoughtful regard lor the 
feelings of others denotes a 
real civilization. 

M0FFETT and McMULLEN 



Funeral Directors and 
Embalnurx 

TEL. WIN. 1730 

Lady Assistant Taxi Service 



i am ae 



For Twenty Years It 
Has Been Our Aim To 
Sell Good Merchandise 

RELIABLE STANDARD LINES 

GUARANTEED TO GIVE SATISFACTION 

We shall conlinue this policy and invite you to call 

and mike your Hollrhy selections NOW, thereby gaining 
lime and a first choice. 

You will find attractive and suitable gifts for all the 
family. 

WE GASH CHRISTMAS tLU3 CHECKS 
Tel. Us Your Wants 0272 

Franklin £. Barnes Co. 

See Our Window Display 



CHRISTMAS CARDS 

— at— 

THE WINDSOR SHOP 

530 MAIN STREET 

A good selection of Special Cards for all relatives, friends 
and children, 5c to $1.00 
Books at $1.00 for All Ages 
Hand Painted Silhouette Plates 75c to $1.50 
Tiptables and Plant Stands in Solid Mahogany or Maple 

$5.00 to $9.00 



Make This a Practical 
Christmas ! 

And what is more practical for chil- 
dren than nice, warm bath-robes? 

ALL ROBES NOW $1.25 AND $2.50, AT 



/ 



CHARLES HAGUE 

Cabinet Maker 

Antique* Krito/rd — Kurnitar* Made and 

Krpairrd— L'phaUtrrrd and Patiahmi. 
SHOP. IT PARK ST., WINCHESTER 
" Tel. Win. IMa-W 

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WM. E. CILESKI | 

Expert Piano Tuner ( 

Pormtrt) with Maun Hamlin 10 Ynn « 

P. O. Itu\ m WOBL'RN, MASS. I 

TEL. WOB. I2I3-M d$-U j 



SINCE I87Z 




for 
BER 



A. M. EDLEFSfM 

REAL ESTATE & MORTGAGES 

FOR SALE 

9 room\T,E2 HWE ~ S ™ r « nuiel location, 

9 room house a maximum ol comfort at a minimum expense 
r L T refrigeration. 2 hath*, pleasant gas kitchen, one^ 

Th^rTe^^ll"^ ' S , V,< !,< "" 1 ,UU "" in * id < and 

THREE excellent building lots on West Side. 

10 STATE STREET, BOSTON TEL. HUBBARD 1978 

Winchester Office, 2 Thompson Street 
Tel. Win. 2285 Res> Te ], Wjn> 070Q 



We are as near as your telephone 
P. H. HIGGIP.3 WINCHESTER 0fi06 



IT KEN WIN ROAD 



Commercial and Home Photographer 

If you have picture? to be framed a 
telephone call will brinn demonstrator. 
Leave your films at Hevey's Pharmacy 
or Star Office for our usual service. 



FOR SALE 



NEAR CENTER. New six-room house with sun-room. Three 
sunny chambers, tile Lath, steam heat, garage. Good location, 
financed to suit buyer. Price $8500. 

RENTAL. Six-room apartment, $40 per month. 



S. V 



OLSON 

572 MAIN STREET WINCHESTER 
Tel. Win. 0032— Res. 0365 



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RENTALS 

We have at present a number of attractive single 
houses which can be rented at very reasonable figures, 
the rents varying from $75 a month to $158. 

If you are thinking of renting a single house, let us 
submit our list. 



A. Miles Holbrook 

24 Church St.— Win. 1250 Res.-Tel. 0609 

STEPHEN THOMPSON, Win. 0103-W 



Silk Hose Sale 

An all silk chiffon, with a double pointed heel, in a splen- 
did line of colors, all sizes 8 2 to 10'. These have 
always sold at a much higher price. While this lot 
lasts $1.00 per pair or 3 pairs for $2.75. 

We are also closing out our L 275, Rayon Stockings. 
These have always been sold for $1.00 per pair. 
While our stock lasts the price will be 69c. 



AGENT FOR ( ASH'S WOVEN NAMES 



G. Raymond Bancroft 

IS Mt. VtrnM S4rttt 



Tel. Win. 067 1 -W 



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COPYRIGHT BY WESTERN NEWSPAPER UNION 











THK WINCHESTER, MASS. STAR, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1930 



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PAYMENTS MAY BE MADE BY 
MAIL. SEND OR TELEPHONE 
FOR MEMBERSHIP CARDS. 

WINCHESTER 
1320—1321 



A CHRISTMAS CLUB FUND 
NEXT CHRISTMAS 

Will Seem Like a Gift from Santa 

Claus 



'W'OU will hardly realize when you receive it that it is 
* your own money— the amounts you systematically 
deposited weekly in our Christmas Club. 

Besure and enroll in one or more classes. A little fore- 
sight—a little thrift and your wishes for a Merry Christmas 
will come true. 



Let Everyone in the family join and have 
the Merriest Christmas ever in your home. 

Join Now! 



PAYMENTS MAY BE MADE BY 
MAIL. SEND OR TELEPHONE 
FOR MEMBERSHIP CARDS. 



WINCHESTER 
1320—1321 




Winchester National Bank 

WINCHESTER NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 
7-9 CHURCH STREET WINCHESTER, MASS. 




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SHOP IN WINCHESTER 



^illlilioilllllliliiciliiii iiiiii[]>iiiiiiiiiii;}iiiiiii!iiii[]ii!iiiiiiiii[]iiiiii!iiiii::.iiiiiiiiiii[]iii;iii!iii!Ciiiiiiiiiiiii[]i' 



-:- Eat In Winchester -:- » 



BEST OF HOME COOKING 

APPETIZING FOOD REASONABLE PRICES | 
Luncheon 50 Cents— Evening Dinner 75 Cents 

THE FOOD SHOP | 

32 Church Street | 

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illllllllllUIIIIHIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIMIIIM [}i'!":)ii;iic]iiiiimiiiit]iiiiiiiiiih[j|iiiii ICJI i nilllllinillClllllllllllllCJIIilMlli; 



We extend to our Patrons 
THE COMPLIMENTS OF THE SEASON 
wishing them 
A MERRY CHRISTMAS 
and 

A PROSPEROUS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR 

WATERFIELD RESTAURANT 

.in:-::( 





I.I (, ION POST TO «IVK DOLLS TO 
IOO0 GIRLS 



SHOP IN WINCHESTER 



Crosscup-I'ishon Members' Wives 
Ha\«* Committee 



keting ability will outclass the men's 
when it com s tn gi • ; i r i >r the most t"< • t- 
their money. 




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The Winchester 
Chamber of Commerce 

SUPPORTS 

The advice of the President and other Statesmen 
that we SPEND this holiday season to relieve the 
business depression. 

SUGGESTS 

That we spend our Christmas money in Winchester 
where local merchants will benefit and be encour- 
aged to provide even better stocks in the future. 

BELIEVES 

That the whole community will benefit by such a 
spirit of co-operation. 

THE CHAMBER WISHES 

every one a 
MERRY CHRISTMAS 
and pledges itself to continued effort that 
THE TOWN'S NEW YEAR 
may be a 
HAPPY ONE 



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Crosseup-Pishon Post of the Ameii- 
in I.i lv. in, which annually at Christ- 
ian time for the last several years 
is brought smile- and joy to many a 

oily little girl with a big doll 1 
might from Santa Claus, is in the 
itlsi of this k"">I work again tKi- 
•ar. 

In other years the demand was so 
•iut for dollies that the men of the 
' I were unable to obtain sufficient 
ills tn go around. So this year the 
ives of the members have formed a 
ill committee, with l 111 "' dolls as the 
>Bl. 

The call for dolls this year i- larjr- 
• than ever and the women's com- 
.ittec, headed by Mrs. George C, 
iswell of T'i Fletcher street, will be 
ad to receive such gifts or the mon- 

■ equivalent, 

Although the appeal is for either a 

■ li or a dollar, the womenfolk pre- 
r the money. They feel their mar- 



ATTEMPTED FLH FLAM 

Edwin Berry, an employee ai the 
Atlantic Filling Station ' on Mam 
street notified the police <■( an effort 
to Aim Ham him at the station last 
Saturday. 

A motorist drove into the station 
and purchased 5 gallons of gasoline. , 
After pretending to search for a .<! ^gj, 
bill, he tendered a $20 bill in payment 

;■ the gas and after receiving hi: "\\ 
change, found the dollar anil asked 



(fAll GooSlPisKes 

1 THE CENTRAL GARAGE | 



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STORAGE BY THE DAY OR MONTH 
NIGHT AND DAY WASHING 
REPAIRS— ACCESSORIES 
PRF.ST0NE WEED CHAINS N0-VAP 

Our Service Is Prompt, Reliable and Reasonable 
WINCHESTER PLACE PEL. \\ IN. 1378 




"N*^ ^ * r* 1 r% " ,+r *<*i*,JK 4 p*3* J*2 l+m 9 ^? '■' " ■ — 1^*^*9 rv-" ^1 t+_ m _*rf - 

WINCHESTER 
1 NEWS COMPANY 



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THOMPSON STREET 



WINCHESTER 



Select your Christmas cards now 
while our stock is complete. There 
arc some most attractive new cards 
for your approval at the Star Office. 




(s-reelincs lo Our 
' °fjkircnj' 



Wishing You a 



! ittrrrti Xraaii 

j The Shoe Hospital 

j EXPERT SHOE REP VtRING 
I Goodyear Well Process 

| HAT CLEANING SERVICE 

I RUBBERS \M> SNE VKERS 
I FOR SALE 

! 535 Main Street 
Phone Win. 0272-R 



I 



/Vrr^ Christmas 



I MATHEWS' j 

i Barber Shop ■ 

i i 

| In Winchester for :?1 Years | 

! SANITARY SHOP \ 

; EXPERT SERVICE j 

I 20 Thompson Street | 

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Christmas Cards for All the Family 
Dennison's Christmas Decorations 
Toys and Games 
Christmas Stationery 
Moore's Fountain Pens and Pencils 
Schaeffer and Waterman Pens and Pencils 
Candles 
Schrafft s Chocolates 

Wrapping Paper 

Crepe Paper, Plain and Decorated 
Tissues Paper, All Colors 
Twine 

Seals and Tags 

Grey Gull Records 
Photomailers 

Pipes. Cigars, Tobacco 



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Subscriptions Taken for All Magazines 
All the Popular Brands of < i«ar^ and Tobacco in Christmas 
Boxes and Jar- at Boston Prices 



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THE WINCHESTER, MASS., STAR, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1930 



SHOP IN WINCHESTER 



7- 



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-OurBest, 



WINCHESTER CUSTOM 
SHOE REPAIRING 



I n our Friends and Customers at 
Christmas, with the promise to | 
serve them even better in 1930, • ^- 

i ft 

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Shoe Shining 

Expert Work 

Reasonable Prices i \." 

LEO ORLANDO I |: 

2 < onvcrse PI. ' 'J? 



flfocrrv Cbmtmas to I 
IJcu Hll 1 

iTMlBSuutl&BftSllopi 



SHOP IN WINCHESTER 



SHOP IN WINCHESTER 



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HEVEY'S 



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A ^ift is a gift, but a ^ift of merit j| |; 
Sg is doubly appreciated. We have r& 
something for everybody 



wishes to extend to its many patrons, the season's 
greetings and thanks tor past patronage. It will be 
our aim during the new year to make our already 
tine service even more worthy of the most discrimi- 
nating. Our completely remodelled Shoppe compares 
favorably with any in the Stale, and we iiase avail- 
able the best and latest equipment for all branches 
of beauty culture. 

WHY NOT A PERMANENT AS A CHRISTMAS GIFT? 

si o 

UNTIL JANUARY 31 



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only the best 



CIGARS 

CIGARETTES 

CANDY 

TOILET SETS 
PERFUMES 
TOASTERS 
F LAT IRONS 
TOBACCO 



TOBACCO POUCHES 
FLASHLIGHTS 
STATIONERY 
THERMOS BOTTLES 
CURLING IRONS 
WAFFLE IRONS 
HOT WATER BOTTLI S 
TOILET ARTICLES 



Unexcelled service in 
our Men's Shop 



Try our new steam 
treatment for falling 
hair and all scalp trou- 
bles. 



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QUALITY FIRST 



VVK SPK< r.VLIZE IN CHILDREN'S H.UR< I I HM, 

560 Main Street Win. 0517 

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riil STRATED II. \ N TO STRIP Cassidy was unsuccessful in cateh- 

MACHINE ins the thieves who leaped into an 

automobile and escaped toward Cain- 

I he prompt action of Patrolman bridge street, The machine they 

William K. Cassidy >f the Police De- were stripping was a Steams-Knight 

partment last Thursday night pre- roadster, which had been parked on 

vented two young men from strip- 'Calumet i?o«d at s o'clock and stolen 

I n« an automobile, owned by Charles about an hour later. A raincoat anil 

?9L , - l - 1 of 23 Everett avenue, some side curtains were all the 

m\ Headquarters had been notified of thieves had time to secure before 

0 I an automobile standinp with the they were frightened •••.way. Patrol- 
i^i* , motoi run 
i* 3 Vale <tre< 



gmuuiaimmiwiaNiuiiiunaiiimiHNinimwMM^ 

j -:- E. H. BUTTER-WORTH -:- j 

Wishes v.ou All 

A MERRY CHRISTMAS AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR 1 

\\ VTERMAN FOl XTAIN PENS AND PEXtTI s 
g WRIST \M> PlM KET W \ K HES S 

W EST! LOX I'ROUl l is 
JEW EL UY 

| HAMILTOX-SANGAMO ELECTRIC CLOCKS | 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

I ."> ( ommon Street : ; 

S §5 iiSiSSS'S SS'SS. 
ft. a 

WHAT IS BETTER THAN A 



Nice Dress For A 
Xmas Gift 

EITHER AFTERNOON. EVENING OR SPORT DRESS 



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HOSIERY, CREPE DE CHINE UNDERWEAR 
AND NIGHTGOWNS 

]8jv Make excellent gifts of which we have a good assortment. $7 

|: FOR THE LITTLE GIRLS % 

We have Dresses, Skirts and Sweaters. t ^ • 

We also have a good assortment of Beads, Pocket-books, 
W, Handkerchiefs and Hand Embroidered Linens. 

| — | 

| Betty Ann Stiop I 

B 16 MT. VERNON STREET § 

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SHOP IN WINCHESTER 

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i of man Cassidy returned the ear to its 



Hevey's Pharmacy 

TEL. WIN. 0324 553 MAIN STilEET 



U12-2I 



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running at the jun 

t and Eoxcroft road, and i owner. 
Patrolman Cassidy was on liis way 
to investigate when he was told l>y 

two residents of the district that two "Larry" Palmer of this town, a 
young men were stripping a machine sophomore at the University of Ver- 
al the place designated in the tele- mont and a veteran on tin- varsity 
I'h' i.e call, hockey team, recently reported as t 

Hastening to the snot, Patrolman 1 candidate for this year's team. 



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SHOP IN WINCHESTER 



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PYREXWARE || 
CUTLERY-FLASHLIGHTS | | 

KITCHENWARE ? | 1 

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IS 



^Christmas Gifts 



For Every 
Member of the Family 



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46 Mt. Vernon Street 



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Practical 
Christmas 
Gifts 



Appearance Counts 

Now as ne